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December 19, 2019

Reporting Structure

This report provides a status summary for all of the 2019 Annual Service Plan program interventions that were in progress in Q3 (July 1st to September 30th).

All active interventions received a status update using the following categories:

  • On Target (the intervention is progressing at the planned pace)
  • Variance (the intervention is behind the planned pace)
  • Complete (the intervention has been completed)
  • Deferred (current work on the intervention has been stopped – with potential to continue next year)
  • Cancelled (the intervention will no longer occur)

If the intervention was identified as ‘Variance’, ‘Deferred’, or ‘Cancelled’, a reason was provided. In these cases, the most relevant reason was selected from the following list:

  • 2019 Labour Disruption (the labour disruption resulted in changes to the intervention)
  • Adjusted Program Priorities (program priority alterations resulted in changes to the intervention)
  • Human Resource Issue (staffing circumstances resulted in changes to the intervention)
  • Partnership Limitations (external partner(s) did not to meet their obligations)
  • Public Health Emergency (a significant public health emergency resulted in changes to the intervention)
  • Resource Limitation (financial, material, or internal support limitations resulted in changes to the intervention)

It is important to note that reporting reflects a summary of progress made on interventions based on the predetermined milestones for the intervention. This does not necessarily represent the amount or scope of work captured under each program.

Operational Plan Status Summary

Overall Quarterly Status Summary

There were 223 interventions in progress in Q3 2019. Figure 1 displays the percentage of interventions that were on target, reported a variance, were deferred, were cancelled, or were completed. A majority of interventions (64%) were either completed or on target. This is a slight increase from Q2, when 63% of plans were reported as completed or on target. 

Intervention Status by Status Type (Q3 2019)

Of the 223 interventions in progress, 36% (79) were deferred, cancelled, or reported a variance. Figure 2 provides a summary of the reasons for variances, deferrals, or cancellations as a percentage of the total number of variances, deferrals, and cancellations. 

Reason for Cancellation, Deferral, or Variance (Q3 2019)

Proposed changes to public health operations and the 2019 labour disruption continued to influence the progress of some interventions, though to a lesser degree than in Q2. The most common reason given for deferral, cancellation, or variance was human resource issues (35%), followed by adjusted program priorities (27%), and the 2019 labour disruption (18%). Combined, the labour disruption, program priority adjustments, and human resource issues accounted for 80% of the variances, deferrals, or cancellations of interventions. 

In some cases, managers and staff provided comments to further explain the reason for deferral, cancellation, or variance. Examples of human resources issues that affected the status of work plans included expected and unexpected leaves of absence and general staff turnover. When adjusted program priorities were cited, examples provided included the service delivery model change in the Healthy Schools department, changing priorities of partners and partnerships, and a need to focus more staff time than expected on other interventions. 

Program Quarterly Status Summary

All interventions are directly tied to programs and program objectives; Figure 3 displays a summary of the status updates for each WECHU program based on the number of interventions that were on target, varied from target, were completed, were deferred, or were cancelled. 

Intervention Status By Program (Q3 2019)


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Prepared By:

Phil Wong, Environmental Health Manager

Date:

December 19, 2019

Subject:

Lead in Drinking Water

BACKGROUND

According to Health Canada, lead in drinking water should be kept as low as reasonably achievable. The most significant contribution of lead in drinking water is generally from lead service lines that supply drinking water to your home. The best approach to eliminate lead exposure is to remove and replace the full lead service line. Lead service lines have not been used for many years but older homes and buildings (pre-1948) may still have lead pipes and service lines. Lead solder and brass fittings/fixtures are also common sources of lead exposure. This report will highlight some of the key regulations and provide some clarification on how lead exceedances are handled in the province of Ontario.

Standards vs. Guidelines and Duty to Report

The Canadian guideline for lead in drinking water was lowered in June 2019 to 5ppb (0.005mg/L) or as low as reasonably achievable. In Ontario, the Drinking Water Quality Standards Reg. 169/03 and the Safe Drinking Water Act, 2002, have the maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for lead in drinking water as 10ppb (0.010mg/L). All municipal drinking water systems and designated facilities are legally required to meet the 10ppb MAC. Under the Act, all drinking water system operators have a duty to report microbiological, chemical and radiological exceedances to their local public health unit and the Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP). The WECHU’s role is to give direction, in the event of an exceedance, on corrective action to eliminate/reduce any health effects.

Municipal Systems

The Drinking Water Systems Reg. 170/03 outlines the sampling protocol and testing requirements for municipal drinking water systems. The MECP regulates these systems and calls for the implementation of an extended lead testing-program. Targeted testing and sampling is conducted by municipal drinking water operators in each municipality, and any lead service lines are replaced when identified. Homeowners on municipal systems are encouraged to contact their local providers for options on lead sampling and other services. Homeowners are notified by the municipal drinking water operator and the health unit if lead is identified through operator sampling. 

Schools and Child Care Centres

Schools and child care centres are required to sample their water for lead as per Ontario Regulation 243/07: Schools, Private Schools and Child Care Centres. This regulation, recently amended in 2017, increased lead sampling requirements in these facilities. There is a requirement for annual sampling and testing of lead in drinking water to ensure lead levels are below the provincial Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standards Reg. 169/03. It also requires flushing of plumbing in schools to help reduce lead levels in drinking water. Flushing has been shown to reduce lead levels in water and is a recognized lead reduction strategy. Schools and child care centres have replaced service lines, decommissioned fountains, installed NSF POU filters and have bottle filling stations when lead exceedances have been identified. The regulation is enforced by the MECP as schools and child care centres are designated facilities, and the health unit takes a lead role to provide guidance on health related issues.

Private Water Supplies

Homeowners using private water supplies within Ontario can send water samples for lead testing to an accredited private laboratory from the MECP list. There is a cost associated with lead testing at a private laboratory. Private homeowners can submit water samples to the Public Health Ontario Laboratory for bacteriological testing (E. coli and total coliforms) and this service is free for all private drinking water systems.

CURRENT INITIATIVES

Under the Ontario Public Health Standard’s Safe Drinking Water and Fluoride Monitoring Protocol, the health unit is mandated to provide 24/7 on-call support and response to all adverse drinking water events. Where water intended for human consumption may not be safe to consume, the health unit is required under the Health Protection Promotion Act to respond. The health unit initiates a response within 24 hours of receiving notification of any adverse event in the region. Boil Water and Drinking Water advisories, as well as legal orders to drinking water system operators, are issued regularly to prevent exposures to any microbiological, chemical or radiological exceedances. The health unit continues to work with municipal drinking water system operators, school boards and private well owners to provide awareness and education on safe drinking water.  

For more information on safe drinking water please visit the sites below:

APPROVED BY

Theresa Marentette


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Board Members Present:

Gary McNamara, Joe Bachetti, Rino Bortolin, Fabio Costante, Gary Kaschak, Judy Lund, John Scott, Ed Sleiman, Larry Snively  ​​​​​​

Board Member Regrets:

Tracey Bailey, Dr. Debbie Kane

Administration Present:

Theresa Marentette, Dr. Wajid Ahmed, Lorie Gregg, Nicole Dupuis, Kristy McBeth, Dan Sibley, Lee Anne Damphouse 

Staff Present:

Kim Casier, Eric Nadalin, Neil MacKenzie, Jen Jershey, Nicole Trajkovski, Denise Barbour, Barb Deter, Nancy Dumouchelle, Heather Gartner, Denise Hryniuk, Dawnice Kavanaugh


QUORUM:  Confirmed

  1. Call to Order
    Board Chair, Gary McNamara, called the meeting to order at 4:04 p.m.
  2. Agenda Approval
    Moved by: Fabio Costante
    Seconded by: Rino Bortolin
    That the agenda be approved.
    CARRIED
  3. Announcement of Conflicts of Interest – None
  4. Presentations
    1. WECHU Long-Term Service Award Presentation (G. McNamara/T. Marentette)
      T. Marentette and Board Chair, G. McNamara, presented long-term service awards for WECHU staff who have put in 20, 25 and 30 years at the health unit. T. Marentette noted that G. McNamara has been a member of the WECHU Board for 21 years this coming January.
      Moved by: Rino Bortolin
      Seconded by: Judy Lund
      To accept the presentations as received.
      CARRIED
  5. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: November 21, 2019
      Moved by: Larry Snively
      Seconded by: Rino Bortolin
      That the minutes be approved.
      CARRIED
  6. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS
      The following information reports were presented to the Board.
      1. Windsor and Essex County Living Wage Program (N. Dupuis)
        Brought to the Board for information.
      2. 2019 Nutritious Food Basket and Eating Well in Windsor-Essex (N. Dupuis)
        Brought to the Board for information.
      3. Q3 Financial Results (L. Gregg)
        Brought to the Board for information.
      4. 2019 Operational Plan Reporting Q3 Status (T. Marentette)
        Brought to the Board for information.
      5. 2019 Q3 Strategic Plan Report (T. Marentette)
        Brought to the Board for information.
      6. Upcoming 2020 Board of Health Competency Self-Evaluation (T. Marentette)
        Brought to the Board for information.
      7. Lead in Drinking Water (W. Ahmed/K. McBeth)
        Brought to the Board for information.
      8. Media Recap
        Brought to the Board for information.

      Moved by: Rino Bortolin
      Seconded by: Larry Snively
      That the Information Reports be received.
      CARRIED

    2. RECOMMENDATION/RESOLUTION REPORTS
      1. Healthy Smiles Ontario Funding
        N. Dupuis brought forward the Healthy Smiles Ontario Funding Resolution for Board of Health approval.
        Moved by: Rino Bortolin
        Seconded by: Fabio Costante
        That the Recommendation/Resolution Report be supported.
        CARRIED
  7. Business Arising – None
  8. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  9. New Business
    1. Strategic Planning Committee (T. Marentette)
      T. Marentette noted that there are 2 Board of Health vacancies on WECHU’s Strategic Planning Committee. The 2017-2021 WECHU Strategic Plan sets out our plan to enhance our delivery of quality public health programs and services to all residents in Windsor and Essex County. The Strategic Planning Committee will meet in early 2020, and each quarter the Board will receive a report on the status of progress made towards the Strategic Priorities in that quarter. Board members Judy Lund and Ed Sleiman volunteered to sit on this Committee.
      Moved by: Joe Bachetti
      Seconded by: Ed Sleiman
      That the above information be received.
      CARRIED
  10. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters – For Support
    1. City of Hamilton, Office of the Mayor – Letter to Hon. Minister Christine Elliott – Opposition to Co- Payment of Dentures Under the New Ontario Seniors Dental Care Program
    2. City of Hamilton, Office of the Mayor – Letter to Hon. Minister Patty Hajdu – Endorsement of Comprehensive Measures to Address the Rise of Vaping in Canada
    3. Sudbury and District Health Units – Letter to Hon. Minister Christine Elliott – E-Cigarette and Aerosolized Product Prevention and Cessation

    Moved by: John Scott
    Seconded by: Larry Snively
    That the above correspondence be supported as noted.
    CARRIED

  11. Committee of the Whole (CLOSED SESSION, in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
    The Board moved into Committee of the Whole at 4:18 pm
    The Board moved out of Committee of the Whole at 4:20 pm
  12. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or January 16, 2020 in Windsor, Ontario
  13. Adjournment
    Moved by: Fabio Costante
    Seconded by: Judy Lund
    That the meeting be adjourned
    CARRIED
    The meeting adjourned at 4:22 pm.

RECORDING SECRETARY:

SUBMITTED BY:

APPROVED BY:


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ISSUE

Healthy Smiles Ontario (HSO) is a publically funded dental care program for children and youth 17 years old and under from low-income households. The Ministry of Health introduced HSO in 2010 as a 100% provincially funded mandatory program for local health units, providing $1,529,700 in funding for children in Windsor-Essex (2019). HSO covers regular visits to a licensed dental provider within the community or through public health units.

In April 2019, the provincial government introduced its 2019 Budget Protecting What Matters Most (Minister of Finance, 2019). Following the release of the provincial budget, the Ministry of Health introduced changes to the funding models for health units effective January 2020. The changes in funding for local health units include a change from a 25% municipal share, 75% provincial cost-shared budget for mandatory programs to 30% and 70% respectively. In addition, the Ministry notified health units that formerly 100% provincially funded mandatory programs such as HSO would now share these costs with municipalities at the rate of 30%, a download of approximately $458,910.00 to local municipalities.

BACKGROUND

Oral health is vital to our general health and overall well-being at every stage of life. Most oral health conditions are largely preventable and share common risk factors with other chronic diseases, as well as the social determinants of health, such as income, employment and education, whereby those in the lowest income categories have the poorest oral health outcomes. Approximately 26% of children (0-5 yrs) and 22.6% of children and youth (0-17yrs) in Windsor-Essex County live in low-income households, compared to 19.8% and 18.4% in Ontario (Windsor-Essex County Health Unit, 2019). Tooth decay is one of the most prevalent and preventable chronic disease, particularly among children. In Windsor-Essex from 2011 to 2016, the number of children screened in school with decay and/or urgent dental needs increased by 51%.  Tooth decay is also the leading cause of day surgeries for children ages one to five. The rate of day surgeries in Windsor-Essex in 2016 was 300.6/100K compared to 104.0/100K for Ontario, representing a significant cost and burden to the healthcare system (WECHU Oral Health Report, 2018). For children, untreated oral health issues can lead to trouble eating and sleeping, affect healthy growth and development, speech and contribute to school absenteeism.

In 2016, the MOHLTC integrated six publicly funding dental programs into one 100% funded program, providing a simplified enrolment process and making it easier for eligible children to get the care they need. The HSO program was part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy commitment to build community capacity to deliver oral health prevention and treatment services to children and youth from low-income families in Ontario. Windsor-Essex Health Unit operates two dental clinics, one in Windsor and one clinic in Leamington. The WECHU provides preventative and restorative services with a team of registered dental hygienists, general dentists and a pediatric dentist. There is about a six-month wait list for services in our current clinics. The number of preventative oral health services provided through the WECHU dental clinics has increased year over year from 1,931 in 2011 to 7,973 in 2017 (WECHU Oral Health Report, 2018).

Community dentists are not required to take patients under the Healthy Smiles Ontario program which can create barriers to accessing services. Changes to the funding model for HSO will not affect the services provided by local dentists and is only applied to local health units. Mixed model funding for public health units and private fee-for-service dental providers, poses a risk to the delivery of the HSO program in Ontario. Based on the data and analysis in the 2018 Oral Health report, the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit proposed recommendations to improve the oral health status in Windsor-Essex including: Improve access to oral health services within Windsor-Essex and advocate for improved funding for oral health services and expansion of public dental programs such as Healthy Smiles Ontario to priority populations. Given the growing urgent need and increase in dental decay among vulnerable children in Windsor-Essex and recognizing the existing barriers to access to care, the WECHU recommends that HSO retain its current funding and structure as 100% funded, merging it with the Ontario Seniors Dental Care Program to be a comprehensive dental care program for vulnerable children and seniors in Ontario.

PROPOSED MOTION

Whereas the WECHU operates a dental clinic in Leamington and Windsor for HSO eligible children with wait times for services exceeding 6 months, and

Whereas one in four children under five years (26.0%), one in five children under 17 years (22.6%), and one in ten seniors (11.4%) in Windsor and Essex County live in poverty, and

Whereas inadequate access and cost remain barriers to dental care for Windsor and Essex County residents, 23.7% report that they lack dental insurance that covered all or part of the cost of seeing a dental professional, and

Whereas indicators show an overall trend of declining oral health status among children in Windsor and Essex County compared to Ontario, and

Whereas the rate of oral health day surgeries for children in Windsor and Essex County (300.6/100K) far exceeds that of Ontario (100.4/100K), and

Whereas there is an increased difficulty in obtaining operating room time for dental procedures in Windsor-Essex with wait times exceeding 1 year for children in need of treatment, and

Whereas there is a chronic underfunding of the Healthy Smiles Ontario program creating barriers to accessing services among local dentists, and

Now therefore be it resolved that the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health recognizes the critical importance of oral health for vulnerable children and youth, and

FURTHER THAT, urges the Ministry of Health to reconsider its decision to download 30% of the funding of the Healthy Smiles Ontario Program to local municipalities, and

FURTHER THAT this resolution be shared with the Ontario Minister of Health, the Chief Medical Officer of Health, the Association of Municipalities of Ontario, local MPP’s, the Association of Public Health Agencies, Ontario Boards of Health, the Essex County Dental Society, the Ontario Association of Public Health Dentistry, the Ontario Dental Association and local municipalities and stakeholders.


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November 21, 2019

Flu shots will be offered to board members prior to the meeting at 3:30 p.m.

  1. Call to Order
  2. Agenda Approval
  3. Announcement of Conflict of Interest
  4. Presentations:
    1. Climate Change (W. Ahmed)
    2. Mental Health (N. Dupuis)
  5. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: October 17, 2019
    2. Special Meeting of the Board: November 4, 2019
  6. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS
      1. Mental Health Promotion Framework for Windsor-Essex: Introduction and Next Steps (N. Dupuis)
      2. Influenza Season 2019/2020 (K. McBeth)
      3. School Based Immunization Clinics 2019/2020 School Year (K. McBeth)
      4. Media Recap
    2. RESOLUTION/RECOMMENDATION REPORTS
      1. Local Response to Climate Change (K. McBeth)
  7. Business Arising
  8. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  9. New Business
    1. CEO Quarterly Compliance (T. Marentette)
  10. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters
  11. Committee of the Whole (Closed Session in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
  12. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair or December 19, 2019 – Windsor
  13. Adjournment

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Prepared By:

Nicole Dupuis, Director of Health Promotion

Date:

November 21, 2019

Subject:

Mental Health Promotion Framework for Windsor-Essex County: Introduction and Next Steps

Background

In 2018, the revised Ontario Public Health Standards included mental health promotion as a new requirement for public health units in Ontario (Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, 2018). In preparation for this work, the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (WECHU) and Canadian Mental Health Association Windsor-Essex (CMHA) joined under a strategic partnership agreement for the prevention of mental illness and promotion of positive mental health through shared resources and leadership.

CMHA and WECHU have collaborated on a number of projects since the inception of their strategic partnership, including but not limited to the development of the suicide prevention coalition, suicide prevention awareness month, curriculum supports for First Responders, and gambling awareness and prevention. As a first step in partnership toward Mental Health Promotion, the CMHA and the WECHU identified the need to develop a Mental Health Promotion framework for Windsor-Essex. 

Current Initiatives

Early in 2019, the WECHU and CMHA began work on a local report for positive mental health. The shared vision of the report was to outline:

  • A mental health promotion framework for community adoption;
  • A shared community understanding and meaning of mental health promotion;
  • Current services and programs for mental health promotion in Windsor-Essex; and
  • Areas for future work and collaboration.

Over a six-month period, key stakeholders across Windsor-Essex were engaged in an environmental scan via focus group and online survey. The purpose of the scan was to understand current services related to mental health promotion in Windsor-Essex as well as to understand opportunities for future planning.

The results of the mental health promotion scan have been combined with the mental health promotion framework for the first report on Mental Health Promotion for Windsor-Essex. 

References

Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. (2018). Ontario Public Health Standards: Requirements for Programs, Services and Accountability. Toronto: Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

Consultation

The following individuals consulted in the development of this report:

  • Claudia den Boer, Executive Director, Canadian Mental Health Association Windsor-Essex
  • Kim Willis, Director, Canadian Mental Health Association Windsor-Essex
  • Neil Mackenzie, Manager, Chronic Disease & Injury Prevention, Windsor-Essex County Health Unit
  • Alex Erikson, Mental Health Specialist, Windsor-Essex County Health Unit
  • Mindy Hartleib, PhD candidate, University of Windsor
  • Kelly Farrugia, Manager, Healthy Schools, Windsor-Essex County Health Unit
  • Felicia Lawal, Manager, Healthy Families, Windsor-Essex County Health Unit

Approved By:

Theresa Marentette, CEO


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Prepared By:

S. Manzerolle

Date:

November 21, 2019

Subject:

School Based Immunization Clinics 2019/2020 School Year

Background

Ontario’s school-based immunization program for students delivered by the WECHU includes immunization of eligible Grade 7 students against three diseases: Hepatitis B (HBV), Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), and Meningococcal Disease (Men-C- A,C,Y,W-135 vaccine). Hepatitis B vaccine protects against a virus that can permanently damage one’s liver and is a leading cause of liver cancer. Meningococcal vaccine (specifically Menactra) protects against a bacteria which causes inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord and/or an infection of the blood. HPV vaccine protects against many types of cancers including cervical and other genital cancers, as well as genital warts.

Participation in the school-based vaccination program is voluntary, however students must have proof of immunization against Meningococcal disease (specifically with the Menactra vaccine) in accordance with the Immunization of School Pupils Act (ISPA) in order to attend school.

According to the Public Health Ontario Immunization Coverage Report for School Pupils in Ontario, for the 2017-18 school years, Ontario falls short in the uptake of these vaccines in meeting the national goal. In comparison to the province, however, the WECHU surpassed the Ontario average among 12 year olds for immunization with HBV, HPV, and Menactra vaccines. For the 2017-2018 school year (grade 7 students), the immunization coverage rates for the school based vaccines are as follows:  HBV - 71.9%, HPV - 60.9%, and Menactra - 82.9%

Current Initiatives

The WECHU implements the school-based immunization program across 130 elementary schools in Windsor and Essex County.  This includes students from four school boards as well as private and agency schools. The WECHU offers immunization in schools in two rounds: Fall (Sept-Dec) and Spring (April-June). Typically the first dose in a series of HPV and HBV vaccines are given during the first round, with the second dose, along with the single dose of Menactra, offered during the second round.

Due to the labour disruption at the WECHU in the spring, both the first and second round of the school-based immunization program for the 2019/2020 school year is currently in progress, targeting both the Grade 7 and Grade 8 cohorts.  The WECHU also provides catch-up and in-house immunization clinics outside of the school setting for eligible students for the HPV, HBV and Menactra vaccines; upcoming catch-up clinics will take place in November and December.

The WECHU is currently entering the final year of a five-year plan to improve immunization coverage rates and compliance with the ISPA.  The five-year plan has included an expanding number of student cohorts who are identified and targeted for record review annually.  Parents of students with out of date records receive a series of communications requesting updated immunization information. Families are provided with a deadline, before which they are required to update their immunization record, otherwise they face suspension from school for up to twenty days. The next school suspension, which will include all elementary school students (JK-8) will occur in March 2020.  The initial notices to families will be distributed during the week of November 11, 2019.

Approved By:

Theresa Marentette


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Prepared By:

S. Manzerolle, Manager, Healthy Schools Department

Date:

November 21, 2019

Subject:

Influenza Season 2019/2020

Background

The WECHU plays a key role in the implementation of the Ministry of Health’s Universal Influenza Immunization Program (UIIP) which offers influenza vaccine free of charge each year to all individuals six months of age and older who live, work, or attend school in Ontario.

Under the UIIP, the provincial supply of influenza vaccine doses is received from the Ontario Government Pharmacy (OGP) in predetermined increments dependent on vaccine availability and timing from each of the vaccine manufacturers. The WECHU receives influenza vaccine shipments from OGP and is responsible for the distribution to health care providers in the community.  Allocation to providers is based on total community allocation, number of clients to be served, past usage by the provider, available fridge space, and the proportion of high-risk clients of the provider. The initial supply of influenza vaccine is prioritized for the immunization of high-risk individuals (i.e. long-term care homes and hospitals). Immunization of the general population commences once the provincial supply is replenished. 

In preparation for, and over the course of the influenza season, the WECHU maintains ongoing communication with all providers and pharmacies and relays information about the timelines for vaccine availability. Tailored information packages including vaccine product information, ordering information, and promotional materials are also compiled and distributed to providers by the WECHU each influenza season.

Current Initiatives

Currently the Health Unit has received about 90% of our total influenza vaccine allocation for the 2019/2020 season.  The first large shipment was received at the beginning of October and was distributed to high-risk groups at long term care facilities, retirement homes, and hospitals. In particular, these facilities received 100% of the doses they required for their residents/patients.  Health Care Providers (HCPs) received small quantities for their high-risk patients with the first shipment of vaccine.

A second large shipment was received to the Health Unit mid-October and is being used to fill HCP orders in the community. In addition, there are approximately 100 pharmacies in Windsor and Essex County that were approved to provide influenza vaccine to individuals 5 years of age and older.

The WECHU will provide one public influenza clinic at the University of Windsor on November 18, 2019. The clinic provides influenza vaccine free of charge, and an Ontario Health Card is not required; the clinic is open to the public, however targets international students and their families.

In November, 2019 the WECHU will implement a public influenza or ‘flu’ campaign, which will support Immunize Canada’s key messages encouraging individuals and families to get the flu shot.  The campaign also includes materials aimed at groups such as health care workers, pregnant women, young children, and those 65 years and older.

Approved By:

Theresa Marentette, CEO


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Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

November 1, 2019

Subject:

October Media Relations Recap Report

October Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

32

Interview Requests

19

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

11
Requests for Information 2

October 2019 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

[[chart-nid:5495,chart-view-mode:full]]

Media Coverage

Outlet

Number of Stories

AM 800

6

Blackburn

5

CBC

9

CTV

7

Mediaplex/St Clair College

2

The London Free Press

1

Windsor Star

2

TOTAL

32

News Release, Media Advisories and Media Statements

Date Type Headline Response

October 15, 2019

Media Advisory

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board Of Health Meeting

4 Stories Reported

October 16, 2019

News Release

Presence Of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) Virus In WEC

5 Stories Reported

October 17, 2019

Media Advisory

Health Unit Campaign Promotes Safety With Cannabis Edibles

3 Stories Reported

October 29, 2019

Media Advisory

Local Workplaces To Be Recognized For Commitment To Employee Health And Wellness

0 Stories Reported

October 31, 2019

News Release

Local Workplaces Recognized for Commitment to Employee Health and Wellness

0 Stories Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

October 16, 2019

Deadly EEE Virus Detected In Windsor Essex

October 18, 2019

The Flu Vaccine Has Arrived In Windsor-Essex

October 18, 2019

Health Unit Calls For Marketing Ban On Vaping Products

October 18, 2019

The TKO Show - Homemade Baby Food

October 25, 2019

Province To Ban Promotion Of Vaping Products

October 29, 2019

The TKO Show - Flu Shots, Pro's, And Why Get Them?

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

October 9, 2019

Housing A Big Topic At Ward 3 Meeting

October 16, 2019

Potentially Dangerous Virus Found In Local Mosquito Pool

October 17, 2019

Police Remind Public Of Laws Surrounding Edibles

October 18, 2019

Health Unit Moves To Ban Promotion Of Vaping Products

October 25, 2019

Province Cracks Down On Advertising For Vaping

CBC News

Note: Digital stories were not available for two of CBC’s requests.

Publish Date

Title

October 1, 2019

Flu Vaccine Coming To Windsor-Essex Later Than Expected, Says Pharmacist

October 11, 2019

First Shipment Of Flu Vaccine Received Last Week, Say Windsor-Essex Health Unit

October 16, 2019

Deadly Mosquito-Borne Virus Eastern Equine Encephalitis Found In Windsor

October 17, 2019

Windsor-Essex Health Unit Calls For Ban On Vaping Ads

October 25, 2019

CBC Windsor News October 25, 2019 (mention in clip at 09:00)

October 25, 2019

Windsor Police 'Not Slamming The Door' On Carrying Naloxone Kits, Says Police Chief

CBC Radio-Canada

Note: Digital stories were not available for two of CBC Radio-Canada’s requests.

Publish Date

Title

October 17, 2019

Le Bureau de santé de Windsor-Essex veut l'interdiction des publicités de vapotage

CTV Windsor News

Publish Date

Title

 

October 16, 2019

Windsor-Essex Mosquito Pool Tests Positive For Rare Virus

 

October 17, 2019

Flu Vaccine Shipments Arrive In Windsor-Essex

 

October 16, 2019

Windsor Police Issue Reminder About Cannabis Edibles

 

October 17, 2019

Policing Cannabis

 

October 18, 2019

Vaping Store Owner Opposed To Ban On Flavoured Products

 

October 25, 2019

Ontario To Ban Promotion Of Vaping Products In Convenience Stores

 

October 30, 2019

Dog Attack Prompts Warning From Windsor Man

 

The London Free Press

Publish Date Title

October 26, 2019

'Liquid Gold' - Leamington's Aphria Starts Rolling Out Cannabis Vape Products

Windsor Star

Publish Date Title

October 16, 2019

Mosquito Pool In Windsor-Essex Tests Positive For Rare Encephalitis Virus

October 26, 2019

Liquid Gold' - Leamington's Aphria Starts Rolling Out Cannabis Vape Products

Note: Digital stories (2) were not available for MediaPlex/St. Clair College.

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy, Marc Tortola, and Michael Janisse.


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Board Members Present:

Gary McNamara, Joe Bachetti, Tracey Bailey, Rino Bortolin, Fabio Costante (4:11 pm), Dr. Deborah Kane (4:17 pm), Judy Lund (via phone), John Scott, Ed Sleiman, Larry Snively ​​​​​​

Board Member Regrets:

Gary Kaschak

Administration Present:

Theresa Marentette, Dr. Wajid Ahmed, Lorie Gregg, Nicole Dupuis, Kristy McBeth, Dan Sibley, Lee Anne Damphouse

Staff Present:

Alexis Erickson, Mike Janisse, Stacey Manzerolle, Neil MacKenzie, Jen Jershey, Nicole Trajkovski, Phil Wong, Adrina Zhong (WECHU medical student)

Guests:

Claudia Den Boer, CMHA


QUORUM:  Confirmed


  1. Call to Order
    Board Chair, Gary McNamara, called the meeting to order at 4:03 p.m.
  2. Agenda Approval
    Moved by: Ed Sleiman
    Seconded by: Rino Bortolin
    That the agenda be approved.
    CARRIED
  3. Announcement of Conflicts of Interest – None
  4. Presentations
    1. Climate Change (Dr. W. Ahmed)
      Dr. W. Ahmed brought forward a report on Climate change. Climate change has been noted as the biggest global health threat of the 21st century. It is defined as the long-term shift in weather conditions such as temperature, precipitation, extreme weather events and rising sea levels, and is expected to result in warmer temperatures, longer and hotter summers, more frequent and severe weather events such as tornados, hurricanes, thunderstorms, wildfires, floods and droughts.
      Health impacts of climate change are also felt by indirect exposure through various contamination pathways, transmission dynamics, agroecosystems, socioeconomics, demographics causing more air pollution, extreme weather related illness and death, water and food-borne diseases, ticks, vector-borne diseases and rodent-borne diseases, effects on crops causing food, water shortages, population displacement, and flooding.
      Effects of climate change are prevalent in our own region with periods of extended heat and the blue-green algae bloom in our lakes, the presence of invasive mosquito species not commonly found in our area and multiple 100-year storm events (significant rainfall) resulting in flooding.
      Public health plays a role in climate change through the 2018 Ontario Public Health Standards by following the 2018 Health Environments and Climate Change Guidelines which include assessing the heath vulnerability status of their communities, monitoring the impacts of climate change to inform local vulnerability plans, and engaging and collaborating with municipal stakeholders to address local impacts.
      The Windsor Essex Climate Change Collaborative is a partnership between local municipalities, the County of Essex, the WECHU, the University of Windsor and the Essex Regional Conservation Authority (ERCA) to address regional climate change vulnerabilities and risks facing various different sectors. The City of Windsor has updated their Climate Change Adaptation Plan and 444 Canadian municipalities have Climate Emergency Declarations (including Vancouver, Ottawa, Chatham-Kent, Sudbury, Sarnia, Guelph and Kingston just to name a few. Local declarations are the City of Windsor, Town of Amherstburg, County of Essex and the Town of Tecumseh.
      WECHU’s Next steps relevant to climate change activities include:
      •Completion of a Climate Change and Health Vulnerability Assessment Report (2019)
      •Participate with municipalities and other community agencies in local climate change planning processes
      •Develop and implement a stakeholder and community education and engagement plan
      •Develop resources for residents to increase knowledge of local climate change impacts
      •A Resolution on the Local Impacts of Climate Change be passed and that the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health adopt and implement climate change initiatives and programs that support municipalities and local organizations, both public and private, to take climate action and raise the public’s awareness about the health impacts of climate change in order to drive individual behaviour change in support of climate change action
      Dr. W. Ahmed acknowledged WECHU’s Environmental Health team for their work on this presentation.
    2. Mental Health (N. Dupuis)
      N. Dupuis brought forward a report on Mental Health Promotion (MHP) in Windsor-Essex. MHP is the process of enhancing the capacity of individuals and communities to increase control over their lives and improve their mental health. By working to increase self-esteem, coping skills, social connectedness and well-being, MHP empowers people and communities to interact with their environments in ways that enhance emotional and spiritual strength.
      In 2017, the WECHU and the Canadian Mental Health Association established a strategic partnership focused on mental health promotion and positive mental health and well-being. In 2018, the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care released the Mental Health Promotion Guide as part of the modernized public health standards.
      There is a need to understand the MHP landscape in Windsor-Essex. The goals of intervention are to affect modifiable social determinants of mental health in order to promote positive mental health outcomes. Mapping MHP activities along individual, social and structure domains will also identify areas of strength, and potential gaps in MHP coverage for the region as a whole and for priority populations. In order to facilitate a better understanding of what services are being offered in our community, a service map was developed and an environmental scan conducted. The service map allows users to visualize service providers and their programs, connections between organizations and existing referral pathways.
      Next steps:
      •Share the report and recommendations with stakeholders
      •Communicate and collaborate with community partners and organizations involved with MHP
      •Inform future MHP programming based on community needs
      •Build strategic goals and action plans based on findings from the environmental scan
      •Adopt a shared indicator framework for measuring processes and outcomes
      •Advocate for further resources for MHP
      We need to acknowledge that we have some very serious issues related to mental health, and not just locally. Rino Bortolin noted issues around addictions tied to mental health, and put forward a motion that WECHU administration identify advocacy components to bring to the Ministry of Health. The WECHU administration will follow up with an Advocacy letter to the Ministry to send a strong message and advocate for those suffering with addictions and funding for mental health.
      Moved by: Rino Bortolin
      Seconded by: Dr. Debbie Kane
      That the WECHU compose an Advocacy Letter around mental health concerns to the Ministry of Health
      CARRIED
      Moved by: Rino Bortolin
      Seconded by: Dr. Debbie Kane
      To accept the presentation as received
      CARRIED
  5. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: October 17, 2019
    2. Special Meeting of the Board: November 4, 2019
      Moved by: Joe Bachetti
      Seconded by: John Scott
      That the minutes be approved.
      CARRIED
  6. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS
      The following information reports were presented to the Board.
      1. Mental Health Promotion Framework for Windsor-Essex: Introduction and Next Steps
        Brought to the Board for information.
      2. Influenza Season 2019/2020 (K. McBeth)
        Brought to the Board for information.
      3. School Based Immunization Clinics 2019/2020 School Year (K. McBeth)
        Brought to the Board for information.
      4. Media Recap
        Brought to the Board for information.

      Moved by: Rino Bortolin
      Seconded by: Larry Snively
      That the Information Reports be received.
      CARRIED

    2. RECOMMENDATION/RESOLUTION REPORTS
      1. Local Response to Climate Change (K. McBeth)
        K. McBeth brought forward the Climate Change Resolution for Board of Health approval.
        Moved by: Rino Bortolin
        Seconded by: Fabio Costante
        That the Recommendation/Resolution Report be supported.
        CARRIED
  7. Business Arising – None
  8. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  9. New Business
    1. CEO Quarterly Compliance (T. Marentette)
      The CEO Quarterly Compliance Reports from July 1, 2019 to September 30, 2019 and April 1, 2019 to June 30, 2019 have been signed by CEO, T. Marentette. The April to June report acknowledged the ONA labour disruption in the spring.
      Moved by: Joe Bachetti
      Seconded by: Ed Sleiman
      That the above information be received.
      CARRIED
  10. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters – None
  11. Committee of the Whole (CLOSED SESSION, in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
    The Board moved into Committee of the Whole at 4:43 pm
    The Board moved out of Committee of the Whole at 5:01 pm
  12. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or December 19, 2019 in Windsor, Ontario
  13. Adjournment
    Moved by: John Scott
    Seconded by: Rino Bortolin
    That the meeting be adjourned
    CARRIED
    The meeting adjourned at 5:02 pm.

RECORDING SECRETARY:

SUBMITTED BY:

APPROVED BY:


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ISSUE

Climate change means a long-term shift in weather conditions, such as temperature, rain/snowfall, extreme weather events, and rising sea levels. Climate change is expected to result in warmer temperatures, longer and hotter summers, more frequent and/or more severe weather events such as hurricanes/tornadoes, thunderstorms, wildfires, floods, and droughts. The impacts of climate change have the potential to influence health outcomes, and can impact health through temperature-related illnesses, poor air quality, water and foodborne diseases, exposure to ultraviolet rays, as well as increased risk of vector-borne diseases. (Government of Canada, 2019)

As a part of the modernization of the Ontario Public Health Standards in 2018, updates were made to the Health Hazard Response Protocol, 2019 and Healthy Environments and Climate Change Guideline, 2019 that require public health units, in collaboration with municipalities and local organizations, to address local impacts of climate change. This includes reducing exposure to environmental health hazards in the community, increasing public awareness of health hazards, and developing policies that address climate change. The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (WECHU), in collaboration with municipalities and local partners, is currently working to identify and implement local mitigation and adaptation strategies in order to reduce the negative effects on public health related to climate change.   

BACKGROUND

As noted in the recent Community Needs Assessment 2019 Update, Windsor and Essex County (WEC) has experienced the impacts of climate change in recent years such as record levels of precipitation and severe storms, which have led to widespread flooding events and emergencies. In recent years, there have been periods of extended heat and annual algal blooms that greatly affect our local communities.  Between 1941 and 2012, the annual average temperature for the City of Windsor increased by almost 1°C based on data received from the Environment Canada weather station at Windsor Airport (City of Windsor, 2012). WEC experienced a consistent increase in annual precipitation with a 1 to 3% increase per decade from 1970 – 2000. Heavy rainfall events lasting for approximately 30 minutes increased by 5% per decade during 1971-2000 in Windsor (City of Windsor, 2012). Daily rainfall extremes have especially increased during the months of May, June, and July by 7% per decade during the baseline period. 

The favourable climatic conditions for vector borne diseases is present in Southwest Ontario, especially WEC, and are expected to expand over a wider geographical area by the 2050s and 2080s (Gough et al., 2016). The WECHU’s mosquito and tick surveillance programs have identified the presence and establishment of the lone star tick, and invasive mosquito species like the Aedes albopictus and possibly Aedes aegypti. The lone star tick is a vector for multiple pathogens and its bite can trigger an allergy to red meat. Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes transmit viruses not normally seen in Canada, such as Zika, Dengue fever, and Chikungunya.

In support of the development of a comprehensive local approach to address climate change, the WECHU is collaborating with Essex Region Conservation Authority (ERCA) and local municipalities to undertake development of a regional climate change strategy.  The strategy will include establishment of sector-based implementation teams (e.g., Land Use and Watershed planning, Human Health and Well- being, Water Resources, Nature and Ecosystems, Energy, and Agriculture) and each team will develop a ‘roadmap’ for their issue area. The WECHU will lead the Human Health and Well-being implementation team and will provide local evidence and understanding of the linkages between climate change and health within the WEC, identify promising evidence based interventions, and recognize local system gaps and strategies to address them.  

PROPOSED MOTION

Whereas, WEC is experiencing the environmental effects of climate change with examples such as extreme flooding in 2016 and 2017, heat waves, large algal blooms in our lakes, established population of the mosquito Aedes albopictus (a vector for Zika, Dengue fever, and Chikungunya) and food insecurity; and

Whereas, climate change impacts the health of individuals through temperature-related illnesses and mortality, extreme weather events, poor air quality, water and foodborne diseases, exposure to ultraviolet rays, increased risk of infectious diseases, as well as impacts local agri-business ; and

Whereas, climate change affects vulnerable populations disproportionately such as children, older adults, people with chronic illness, low income and homeless people, newcomers, migrant workers, and people living and working in rural and remote areas; and

Whereas, the WECHU is committed to ongoing collaborations with local organizations and municipalities in WEC on a regional climate change strategy in an effort to protect the safety, prosperity and livability of our region.

Now therefore be it resolved the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health encourages  municipalities to systematically incorporate climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies into new and existing policies and programs such as land use and building applications, and active transportation master plans in order to manage health risks associated with climate change; and

FURTHER THAT, the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health will adopt and implement climate change initiatives and programs that  support  municipalities and local organizations, both public and private, to take climate action and raise the public’s awareness about the health impacts of climate change in order to drive individual behaviour change in support of climate change action.

References:


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November 4, 2019

  1. Call to Order
  2. Agenda Approval
  3. Announcement of Conflict of Interest
  4. Consent Agenda
    1. RESOLUTION/RECOMMENDATION REPORT
      1. WECHU 2020 Budget (T. Marentette/L. Gregg)
  5. Business Arising
  6. New Business
  7. Committee of the Whole (Closed Session in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
  8. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair or November 21, 2019 Essex
    Flu shots will be available for Board Members at 3:30 pm for those who wish to receive
  9. Adjournment

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October 17, 2019

  1. Call to Order
  2. Agenda Approval
  3. Announcement of Conflict of Interest
  4. Presentation: Vaping (W. Ahmed)
  5. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: September 19, 2019
  6. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS
      1. ProsperUs (T. Marentette)
      2. Media Recap
    2. RESOLUTION/RECOMMENDATION REPORTS
      1. Vaping (N. Dupuis)
  7. Business Arising
  8. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  9. New Business
    1. ENWIN Utilities – Fluoride Update (T. Marentette)
  10. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters – For Support
    1. Simcoe-Muskoka District Public Health – Letter to Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor and Hon. Christine Elliott – Vaping
    2. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott – Vaping
  11. Committee of the Whole (Closed Session in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
  12. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair or November 21, 2019 – Essex
  13. Adjournment

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Prepared By:

Theresa Marentette

Date:

September 2019

Subject:

ProsperUs Board Information Report

Background

“ProsperUs is a collective of non-profit, government, health care, education, labour, business, and inspired residents with a shared vision of a prosperous Windsor-Essex County where every young person has the opportunity and support they need to thrive.”1 The unique aspect of ProsperUs is the value of collective impact, a term that captures the importance of organizations coming together to share experiences and expertise for the common goal of supporting youth in our community and making a positive impact in their lives.

The United Way, under the leadership of CEO Lorraine Goddard, is the backbone organization supporting these efforts led by Co-Chairs Janice Kaffer (HDGH) and Noah Tepperman (2018) and Jim Inglis (2019). Financial and in-kind support has occurred across organizations with the lead agencies of the United Way and Hotel Dieu Grace Healthcare dedicating funds and human resources to this initiative. An Investor Table strategy is currently in development.

The vision of ProsperUs is embedded in the work of the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (WECHU). The Ontario Public Health Standards (2018) support working with priority populations and community partners to offer population-based activities that promote the health of the population and reduce health inequities.2 Collective impact initiatives such as ProsperUs’ Cradle to Career, are an effective way to approach large-scale social changes that fundamentally align with public health strategies.

Furthermore, the goal of WECHU’s school based programs and services is to achieve optimal health of school-aged children and youth through partnerships and collaboration with school communities and school boards. By bringing these, and other key strategic community partners together, we create opportunities for meaningful and effective engagement that will move us closer to realizing this goal.

Early work of ProsperUs formalized the Leadership Council, the Data and Evaluation Table, and the Marketing and Communications Working Table. A media launch one year ago introduced the community to the vision of ProsperUs “Every young person in Windsor-Essex County has the opportunity and support to succeed- from cradle to career.”  Other sub committees would follow with the establishment of a Planning Committee in early 2019.

By late Fall (2018), data sharing agreements were established with organizations followed by a community engagement strategy led by Overlap Associates. The goal was to engage community members, including families and youth to gain insights into their perceptions about opportunities for youth in Windsor and Essex County. This strategy included an online survey, key informant interviews and ethnographic research. Street Teams were created from partnering agencies to engage people in the community and conduct brief interviews. Results of community engagement activities were presented to the Leadership Council in December of 2018.

Current Initiatives

The work of ProsperUs moved forward in 2019 with interactive Data Walks implemented in neighbourhoods across Windsor and Essex County to share existing data and engage participants in meaningful discussion about what they had learned and what was missing. In the coming months, further support was provided by the Data and Evaluation Table to examine key indicators and identify priority neighbourhoods.

In July, a media event highlighted the release of the Coming Together- Building a Hopeful Future for Children and Youth in Windsor-Essex County Executive Summary Report which identified Downtown Windsor, West Windsor and the Town of Leamington as priority areas for the initial Cradle to Career focus.

The next phase of the project is the recruitment of staff and community representatives to begin the work of the Community Action Network. It will be these groups, across the three identified neighbourhoods that will delve deeply into the issues and barriers that children and youth are facing in our community and propose innovative solutions to overcome these barriers.

There is much work to be done. The Chairs of the Leadership Council and members of the partnering agencies continue to celebrate milestones in the work that has been accomplished so far. The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit is proud to be part of this initiative and continues to provide human resources and expertise to the Cradle to Career initiative. Specifically, I would like to acknowledge Ramsey D’Souza, our manager of Epidemiology and Evaluation, who is a valued member of the Data and Evaluation Table. Jen Johnston, our Social Determinants of Health nurse participated as a member of the one of the Street Teams. In addition, our Health Unit has put forward names of several members of our Healthy Schools department to participate as co-chair, facilitators and content experts for the Community Action Network working tables.

  1. ProsperUs Communications, July 2018.
  2. Ministry of Health and Long Term Care, Ontario Public Health Standards, 2018.

View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

October 2, 2019

Subject:

September 2019 Media Relations Recap Report

September Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

65

Interview Requests

28

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

32
Requests for Information 5

September 2019 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

September 2019 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Outlet

Number of Stories

AM 800

15

Blackburn

8

CBC

14

CTV

11

London Free Press

1

Mediaplex/St Clair College

1

TVO

1

Windsor Star

11

windsorite.ca

2

Yahoo News

1

TOTAL

65

News Release, Media Advisories and Media Statements

Date Type Headline Response

September 10, 2019

News Release

Health Unit Issues Clarification on Upcoming Cannabis Cruise

9 Stories Reported

September 16, 2019

News Release

First Human Case of West Nile Virus Confirmed

6 Stories Reported

September 17, 2019

Media Advisory

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Meeting

1 Story Reported

September 27, 2019

News Release

Mosquito Activity And Surveillance Update

3 Stories Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Note: Digital stories were not available for three of AM 800’s requests.

Publish Date

Title

September 6, 2019

Two Beaches Not Recommended For Swimming

September 10, 2019

Cannabis Cruise Snuffed Out

September 10, 2019

Windsor Pot Cruise Cancelled After Health Unit Cites Possible Violations

September 11, 2019

Swimming Not Recommended At Two Windsor-Essex Beaches

September 16, 2019

First Local Case Of West Nile Virus Confirmed

September 17, 2019

Boil Water Advisory In Essex

September 18, 2019

Swimming Not Recommended At Three Local Beaches

September 19, 2019

Deadly Mosquito Borne Encephalitis Disease Claims Three Michigan Lives

September 19, 2019

Boil Water Advisory Lifted In Parts Of Essex

September 20, 2019

Opioid-Related Deaths Spike In Windsor-Essex

September 27, 2019

Mosquito Capable Of Carrying Zika Virus Found In Windsor

September 27, 2019

Anti-Stigma Campaign Launches Interactive Display

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

September 6, 2019

An Early Flu Forecast For Windsor-Essex

September 11, 2019

Organizers Cancel Cannabis Cruise After Health Unit Issues Notice

September 16, 2019

Human Case Of West Nile Virus Detected

September 17, 2019

Boil Water Advisory Issued In Essex

September 19, 2019

Ontario Tracking Vaping Related Illnesses

September 19, 2019

Several Windsor-Essex Beaches Still Under Bacteria Warnings

September 19, 2019

Essex Boil Water Advisory Lifted

September 19, 2019

Health Unit To Consider Resolution To Ban Vaping

CBC News

Note: Digital stories were not available for five of CBC’s requests.

Publish Date

Title

September 5, 2019

7 Months, 44,000 Needles Disposed Of In Sharps Bins In Windsor

September 5, 2019

Swimming Not Recommended At Two Windsor-Essex Beaches

September 10, 2019

Cannabis Cruise In Jeopardy Over Concerns With Provincial Smoking Rules, Says Organizer

September 10, 2019

Cannabis Cruise In Jeopardy Over Concerns With Provincial Smoking Rules, Says Organizer

September 19, 2019

22 People In Windsor-Essex Died From Opioid-Related Causes In First 3 Months Of 2019

September 16, 2019

Windsor-Essex Health Unit Confirms First Human Case Of West Nile Virus In 2019

September 18, 2019

Swimming Not Recommended At Three Windsor-Essex Beaches

September 20, 2019

More Consultations For Supervised Injection Site On The Way, Location Now Key Focus

September 27, 2019

Mosquito Capable Of Transmitting Zika Virus Found In Windsor Again

CTV Windsor News

Note: Digital stories were not available for two of CTV’s requests.

Publish Date

Title

 

September 6, 2019

Two Beaches Not Recommended For Swimming

 

September 9, 2019

Windsor-Essex Residents Warned To Get Flu Shots Early

 

September 10, 2019

Windsor Pot Cruise Cancelled After Health Unit Cites Possible Violations

 

September 13, 2019

Windsor health officials and residents weigh in on the effects of vaping

 

September 16, 2019

First Human Case Of West Nile Virus This Year Confirmed In Windsor-Essex

 

September 19, 2019

Three Beaches Unsafe For Swimming In Windsor-Essex

 

September 20, 2019

Over 20 Opioid-Related Deaths Reported In Windsor-Essex In First 3 Months Of 2019

 

September 29, 2019

New Campaign Takes Aim At Windsor-Essex Opioid Crisis

 

September 27, 2019

Health Unit Warns Mosquitoes Still Thrive In Fall

 

London Free Press

Publish Date Title

September 19, 2019

Local Teen Suffers 'Severe Respiratory Illness' Link To Vaping: Health Officials

Windsor Star

Note: Digital stories were not available for one of Windsor Star’s requests.

Publish Date Title

September 3, 2019

Success Of Windsor's Sharps Program Shows Need For More Bins, Report Says

September 10, 2019

Health Unit Puts Kibosh On Cannabis Cruise

September 12, 2019

Mixed Reactions To U.S. Move To Ban Flavoured E-Cigarettes

September 13, 2019

Temporary Overdose Prevention Facility Within Sight

September 17, 2019

First Human Case Of West Nile Virus Reported In Windsor-Essex

September 19, 2019

Three Local Beaches Unsafe For Swimming

September 20, 2019

Local Health Unit On The Hunt For Supervised Injection Site Location

September 23, 2019

Thousands Of Windsorites Hit The Road For Open Streets

September 25, 2019

New Campaign Fights The Stigma Of Opioid Addiction In Windsor

September 20, 2019

Guest Column: The Fact Is: Supervised Consumption Sites Save Lives

Windsorite.ca

Publish Date Title

September 10, 2019

Health Unit Says Smoking And Vaping Cannabis Not Permitted On Upcoming Cannabis Cruise

September 16, 2019

First Human Case Of West Nile Virus Confirmed

Yahoo News

Publish Date Title

September 10, 2019

Upcoming Cannabis Cruise 'May Not Comply' With Provincial Smoking Rules, Says Windsor-Essex Health Unit

Note: Digital stories were not available for MediaPlex (St. Clair College) and TVO.

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy, Marc Tortola, and Michael Janisse.


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WECHU Strategic Plan Progress - At a Glance

Communication and Awareness

Objective

2019 Q2

1.1. 60% of survey respondents are aware of the programs and services offered by the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing

1.2 60% of survey respondents have seen or heard about the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing

1.3 60% of survey respondents are satisfied with internal communication efforts in the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing

Organizational Development

Objective

2019 Q2

3.1. A minimum of 2 organization-wide quality improvement activities will occur annually through to 2021.

Progressing

3.2. 100% of the WECHU staff are trained in change management strategies by 2021.

Progressing

3.3. 100% of corporate risks identified as high have mitigation strategies developed and implemented by 2021

Progressing

3.4. 80% of the WECHU staff have a positive view of organizational culture by 2021.

Progressing

Partnerships

Objective

2019 Q2

2.1. 100% of program/service driven departments implement a formal feedback process with at least one external partnership by 2021.

Progressing

2.2. At least 20% of activities in the operational plan identify formal internal partnerships by 2021.

Progressing

Evidence-based Public Health Practice

Objective

2019 Q2

4.1. 100% of departments collect corporate level client satisfaction data by 2021.

Work Needed

4.2. 100% of the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) 2018 program areas have at least one activity focused on healthy public policy development by 2021.

Progressing

4.3. 100% of the OPHS population health assessment requirements (7), the research, knowledge exchange, and communication requirements (3) and the related protocols are being addressed by 2021.

Progressing

4.4. 100% of our programs and service departments have adopted a health equity approach to an activity by 2021.

Progressing

Communication and Awareness

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q2 UPDATE

1.1 Strengthen the community’s awareness of our programs and services by developing and implementing a corporate communications strategy.

60% of survey respondents are aware of the programs and services offered by the WECHU by 2021.

In Q2, 53% of respondents to the 2019 Corporate External Client Experience Survey reported being somewhat to very familiar with Health Unit programs and services.

The proposed merger of public health units into regional public health entities has halted the development of a formal marketing and communications strategy for the WECHU. The WECHU is working to strengthen specific marketing and communication tactics identified in the Community Needs Assessment.

1.2 Increase the WECHU’s visibility by developing and implementing a community engagement approach.

60% of survey respondents have seen or heard about the WECHU by 2021.

In Q2, 57% of respondents to the 2019 Corporate External Client Experience Survey reported having seen or heard about the WECHU in the last 3 months.

The proposed merger of public health units has halted the development of a formal a community engagement approach. We remain committed in providing engaging content and client service to the community through our current media channels.

1.3 Improve communication within the WECHU by developing and implementing an internal communication strategy.

A Net Promoter Score (Internal Communications) greater than 30

In Q1, the Average Net Promoter Score for internal communications was 12.21. 

Redevelopment of the intranet is underway by the Communications department. Some internal communication efforts were disrupted in Q2 due to the work stoppage.

Partnerships

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q2 UPDATE

2.1 Increase the effectiveness of partnerships through formal feedback mechanisms.

100% of program/service driven departments implement a formal feedback process with at least one external partnership by 2021.

E&E has developed a proposed process to track completed partnership evaluations and will be presenting it to the Leadership Team before implementing.

2.2 Increase the number of internal partnerships.

At least 20% of activities in the operational plan identify formal internal partnerships by 2021.

25% of work plans included in the 2019 Annual Service Plan referenced an internal partner. The PSI and E&E departments are working together to implement an internal partnership evaluation framework to gauge and report on the effectiveness of internal partnerships.

Organizational Development

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q2 UPDATE

3.1 Improve performance by striving towards operational excellence and a focus on continuous quality improvement.

A minimum of 2 organization-wide quality improvement activities will occur annually through to 2021.

Substantial improvements have been implemented for the 2019 planning approach. While the implementation plan for Silver Level Accreditation has been deferred due to the proposed merger of public health units, a Corporate Quality Improvement plan is in development.

 

3.2 Increase our readiness to adapt to internal and external factors through effective change management practices.

100% of the WECHU staff are trained in change management strategies by 2021.

The Professional Development Committee is formally exploring options to bring a variety of change management training to the WECHU. This training will be open to all staff, as a part of the 2019 PD committee supported events.

3.3 Enhance our understanding and monitoring efforts of identified corporate risks to embrace opportunities, create flexibility, and preserve organizational assets.

 

100% of corporate risks identified as high have mitigation strategies developed and implemented by 2021

Corporate risks have been identified and corresponding reporting will be provided to the Ministry in Q3. Progress has been made on the 4 related risk mitigation work plans.  Of the 4 related plans, 2 of the plans were on target, and 2 were progressing but varied from the planned schedule due to human resource issues. 

3.4 Improve organizational culture through people development and employee engagement strategies.

A Net Promotor Score (Engagement) greater than 30

In Q2, the Net Promoter Score for engagement was 16.36. Some communication and engagement efforts were deferred during Q2 due to the work stoppage. Further effort in these areas will continue throughout the year.

Evidence-Based Public Health Practice

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q2 UPDATE

4.1 Establish organizational supports for client-centered service strategies.

100% of departments collect corporate level client satisfaction data by 2021.

This objective was on hold in Q2 due to staffing changes. However, plans for client experience measurement procedures will be developed in this calendar year.

4.2 Develop and implement a framework to support healthy public policy.

100% of the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) 2018 program areas have at least one activity focused on healthy public policy development by 2021.

There were 4 activities focused on healthy public policy completed in Q2 under the Chronic Diseases Prevention and Well-Being Standard. There are activities focused on healthy public policy in progress under the Chronic Diseases Prevention and Well-being Standard, Substance Use and Injury Prevention Standard, the Healthy Environments Standard, School Health Standard and the Healthy Growth and Development Standard.

4.3 Enhance local data collection efforts and analysis to support knowledge exchange both internally and externally.

100% of the OPHS population health assessment requirements (7), the research, knowledge exchange, and communication requirements (3) and the related protocols are being addressed by 2021.

Work plans created in M-Files through the planning processes are being tracked and updated with the reflected OPHS standards.

4.4 Develop and implement protocols that ensure all programs and services are using a health equity approach.

100% of our programs and service departments have adopted a health equity approach to an activity by 2021.

87% of programs have adopted a health equity approach.


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Board Members Present:

Gary McNamara, John Scott, Tracey Bailey, Deborah Kane (4:15 pm), Judy Lund, Joe Bachetti (4:10pm), Larry Snively, Rino Bortolin, Fabio Costante, Gary Kaschak, Ed Sleiman

Board Member Regrets:

N/A

Administration Present:

Theresa Marentette, Dr. Wajid Ahmed, Lorie Gregg, Nicole Dupuis, Kristy McBeth, Dan Sibley, Elspeth Troy


QUORUM:  Confirmed


  1. Call to Order
    Board Chair, Gary McNamara, called the meeting to order at 4:02 pm
  2. Agenda Approval
    Moved by: Rino Bortolin
    Seconded by: Tracey Bailey
    That the agenda be approved.
    CARRIED
  3. Announcement of Conflicts of Interest
    None.
  4. Presentation: Vaping (Dr. W. Ahmed)
    Dr. W. Ahmed began by explaining that an electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) is a device whose function is to vaporize and deliver a chemical mixture typically composed of nicotine, propylene glycol and other chemicals into the lungs. Upon inhalation, the heater known as the atomizer vaporizes the nicotine solution within the e-cigarette, turning it to vapour. There is still a lack of scientific data to support the alleged benefits of vaping. Additionally, there are many regulatory concerns including who is making the vaping products, what the ingredients in the product are and where it can be purchased. Potential health risks remain undetermined, as there are no studies on the results of long-term inhalation of propylene glycol. Few studies have assessed e-cigarettes as a cessation aid or harm reduction tool. There are many public health concerns including vaping related severe acute lung disease.
    In Windsor, WECHU’s tobacco enforcement officers have been doing proactive inspections to ensure compliance with municipal by-laws and the provincial Smoke Free Ontario Act, 2017. There have been several charges issued to both students and vaping product vendors. WECHU staff is also addressing vaping among youth in the area.

    G. McNamara asked Dr. W. Ahmed for an update regarding a recent press release from WECHU regarding a mosquito pool testing positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) virus within Windsor and Essex County.
    Dr. W. Ahmed explained that WECHU has a mosquito control program that runs through the summer months to look for the presence of certain diseases.
    Upon routine testing of the mosquito pools, the presence of EEE virus was identified. The WECHU press release reinforced messaging around protection from bites and removing standing water on properties.
    Moved by: Joe Bachetti
    Seconded by: Fabio Costante
    To accept the presentation as received
    CARRIED

  5. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: September 19, 2019
      Moved by: Judy Lund
      Seconded by: Rino Bortolin
      That the minutes be approved.
      CARRIED
  6. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS
      The following information reports were presented to the Board.
      1. ProsperUs (T. Marentette)
        Brought to the Board for information.
      2. Media Recap
        Brought to the Board for information.

      Moved by: Ed Sleiman
      Seconded by: Fabio Costante
      That the Information Reports be received.
      CARRIED

    2. RECOMMENDATION/RESOLUTION REPORTS
      1. Vaping (N. Dupuis)
        N. Dupuis explained that the proposed motion is to support the ban of the promotion of vaping products in retail settings and online and that the government should restrict vaping flavours except for tobacco. All regulations related to protecting young people from tobacco products should be applied to vaping.
        View the Harms of Vaping and Next Steps for Regulation Resolution report.

      Moved by: Rino Bortolin
      Seconded by: Joe Bachetti
      That the Recommendation/Resolution Report be supported and approved.
      CARRIED

  7. Business Arising
    1. Additional SIS Application – New Addition to Agenda
      R. Bortolin inquired whether the board would take a position on another SIS application going forward in the community. A local group is applying under an emergency need but this application still requires an endorsement by the Health Unit. He inquired as to what would happen if Health Canada reached out specifically to the Health Unit for support. Dr. W. Ahmed advised that the Health Unit is currently working on an SIS application that is carefully looking at risks and community concerns. This application will look to protect both those choosing to inject and the community. G. McNamara stated that as the community is looking to establish the first SIS, it is critical to ensure it is done correctly. He confirmed that should Health Canada reach out for endorsement, it would be brought to the Board.
  8. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  9. New Business
    1. ENWIN Utilities – Fluoride Update (T. Marentette)
      After requesting further information and timelines from Enwin regarding the reintroduction of fluoride, they provided a letter stating the water in Windsor should be fluoridated by late in the third quarter of 2020.
      Moved by: Fabio Costante
      Seconded by: Judy Lund
      That the above information be received.
      CARRIED
  10. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters
    1. Simcoe-Muskoka District Public Health – For Support – Letter to Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor and Hon. Christine Elliott – Vaping
    2. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health – For Support – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott – Vaping

    Moved by: Joe Bachetti
    Seconded by: Rino Bortolin
    That the above correspondence be supported as noted.
    CARRIED

  11. Committee of the Whole (CLOSED SESSION, in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
    The Board moved into Committee of the Whole at 4:44 pm
    The Board moved out of Committee of the Whole at 5:38 pm
  12. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or November 21, 2019 in Essex, Ontario
  13. Adjournment
    Moved by: Rino Bortolin
    Seconded by: Larry Snively
    That the meeting be adjourned
    CARRIED
    The meeting adjourned at 5:43 pm.

RECORDING SECRETARY:

SUBMITTED BY:

APPROVED BY:


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ISSUE

Recent increases in the popularity of electronic cigarette (vaping) products among youth and young adults has led the United States Food and Drug Administration to declare their use an epidemic among young people (U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, 2018). E-cigarettes heat liquid (e- juice) producing an aerosol that e-cigarettes users inhale. The liquid in e-cigarettes or vapes as they are more commonly referred to can include nicotine, cannabinoid (CBD) oils, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or other substances. In Canada student use of vaping products increased by 30% each year between 2015 and 2017 (University of Waterloo, 2017), and a recent study by Hammond et al. (2019) noted vaping rates among 16 to 19 year olds in Canada increased 74% between 2017 and 2018. These nationwide trends are reflected in Ontario where 21.6% of students in Grades 7-12 reported use of a vaping product in their lifetime (Boak et al, 2017).

There are two pieces of legislation which regulate the promotion and sale of vaping products in Ontario. The federal Tobacco and Vaping Products Act (TVPA) aims to address the rising popularity of vaping products among young people by placing restrictions on how they can be advertised. At the provincial level, the Smoke-free Ontario Act (SFOA) 2017 further regulates these products by restricting their sale to minors, regulating how they can be displayed in storefronts, and restricting their use in certain public spaces. The Smoke-free Ontario Act 2017 is enforced locally by the Tobacco Enforcement Officers (TEOs) at the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (WECHU) who inspect spaces proactively, ensure the region’s 223 e- cigarette vendors are operating in compliance, and conduct youth access test shopping inspections to discourage the sale of these products to minors. In spite of these protective measures their remains a lack of adequate safe-guards against promotion of vaping products in places where they may be observed by young people and other vulnerable populations. Promotions are commonly seen at point-of-sale in many convenience and grocery stores, as well as in locations like gas pumps, or parking lots associated with the places where vaping products are sold. As well, newer generation vaping products produced by companies such as JUUL©, VYPE©, STLTH©, or SMOK© are designed to be discrete and efficient nicotine delivery systems which in some cases deliver higher concentrations of nicotine per puff than tobacco cigarettes (American Cancer Society, 2019).

There is currently little research on the long-term health impacts of e-cigarette use and second-hand exposure, although, preliminary research has shown a positive association between use of vaping products and the risk for the uptake and intensity of tobacco smoking (Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario), 2018). This is complemented by the finding by Hammond et al. (2019) that after several decades of decline, tobacco smoking rates among Canadian adolescents have recently increased. Outside of the risk for nicotine addiction and susceptibility for tobacco uptake, the long term health effects of vaping products are unknown. The potential for more acute implications of chronic use have recently been realized with the approximately 1,080 cases of severe respiratory illness and 18 deaths associated with the use of vaping products in the United States (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2019). In September of 2019, Health Canada issued a warning to Canadians that use vaping products to monitor themselves for symptoms of pulmonary illness, which has resulted in Ontario’s health minister ordering all public hospitals to report vaping-related cases of severe pulmonary illness to the Ministry of Health.

BACKGROUND

The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit has been working with municipalities, business, and school administrators to ensure these groups are prepared and educated around the harms of vaping and the existing regulations around vaping in public spaces. Since February of 2019 WECHU Tobacco Enforcement Officers have engaged in enhanced proactive inspections to ensure compliance with both municipal Bylaws and the provincial SFOA 2017. Since the passing of the SFOA 2017 in October of 2018 these efforts have resulted in 25 charges issued to high school students for vaping on or within 20 metres from school property, several verbal and written warnings to both high school and elementary students, 11 charges issued to vaping product vendors for selling vapour products to a person who is under the age of 19 years old, and multiple charges being issued to vaping product retailers for improper display or promotion of their merchandise.

Additional efforts were further described in an information report provided to the Board of Health on June 20, 2019 in which existing and planned activities to address vaping among young people were detailed, including:

  • Distribution of School Vaping Prevention Toolkit to school administrators
  • Participation in a provincial vaping working group
  • WECHU staff education and policy development for clients using vaping products
  • Secondary school proactive enforcement inspections in partnership with local Police Services
  • School and school board presentations for students, teachers, and administrators
  • Policy support offered to school boards
  • Under 25 Electronic Cigarette Vendor Education program
  • Smoke/Vape-free Spaces media campaign

The Windsor-Essex County Board of Health has passed a series of resolutions beginning in 2014 encouraging action at the provincial and local level to curb the potential for harms of vaping particularly among young people and people who do not smoke. The WECHU has since been instrumental in developing and passing local regulations to further protect residents from exposure to smoking and vaping products in public spaces. Since 2014, eight municipal bylaws have been passed which build upon and surpass the existing provincial regulations for smoke/vape-free indoor and outdoor spaces. Support was also provided to the Essex Regional Conservation Authority in their development, passing, and subsequent revisions to include more public spaces in which smoking and vaping were not permitted. A summary of the Board of Health Resolutions which have supported this and future work related to vaping is provided below:

A list of reports, and vaping-related resolutions
Board of Health Report Vaping-related Resolutions
Smoke-free Outdoor Spaces
November 20, 2014
  • Encouraged all Windsor-Essex municipalities to develop and adopt by-laws prohibiting smoking, smokeless tobacco use, and lighted or heated smoking equipment such as hookah/waterpipe, and e-cigarettes in all municipally owned outdoor sport and recreation areas, as well as parks, beaches, trails, playgrounds, 9m from entrances/exits of municipal buildings, transit shelters, and outdoor hospital grounds.
  • Encouraged the Ontario Minister of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC) to amend the SFOA and Regulations to prohibit the use of all forms of smokeless tobacco and lighted or heated smoking equipment such as hookah/water pipe, and e-cigarette use in areas where smoking is prohibited.
  • Recommended that the MOHLTC further amend the SFOA and ban stores from selling e-cigarettes to those under 19 and from displaying, advertising or promoting them.
Smoke-free Multi-Unit Dwelling
May 16, 2019
  • Encouraged all landlords and property owners of multi-unit housing to voluntarily adopt no-smoking policies in their rental units or properties and explicitly include cannabis smoke and vaping of any substance in the definition of smoking.
  • Encouraged all future private sector rental properties and buildings developed in Ontario to be vape and smoke-free from the onset.
  • Encouraged public/social housing providers to voluntarily adopt no-smoking and/or vaping policies in their units and/or properties.
  • Encouraged public/social housing developments in Ontario should be smoke and vape-free from the onset.
Smoke-free Outdoor Spaces
June 20, 2019
  • Encouraged municipalities to prohibit the smoking or vaping of any substance on all municipally owned outdoor sport and recreation properties, as well as parks, beaches, trails, playgrounds, at minimum, 9m from entrances/exits of municipal buildings, transit shelters, and transit stops.

In their consultation process, Health Canada and the Ontario Ministry of Health (formerly, the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care) provide public health units, other health organizations, stakeholders, and the general public with the opportunity to provide feedback into new regulations related to public health matters. The WECHU has responded with feedback at every opportunity provided by these levels of government in their consultations related to vaping. A summary of the feedback provided can be referenced below:

A list of consulations from Health Canada and Ontario Ministry of Health, and feedback provided by the Health Unit
Consultation Summary of Feedback Provided
Smoke-free Ontario Act 2017
Ontario’s Regulatory Registry
October 2018
  • Restrict the places in which electronic cigarettes can be sold and apply strict regulations to those places where sale is permitted.
  • Limit exposure of youth and young adults to vaping products in retail settings by applying the same limitations placed on the display and sale of tobacco products to vapour products.
Reducing the Impact of Vaping Product Advertising on Youth/Non-Users of Tobacco
Health Canada Consultation Document
March 2019
  • Prohibit vaping product advertisements at points of sale in places where youth are permitted access, including online.
  • Ban vaping advertising, like tobacco, to protect the health of youth.
  • Support for the proposal that should advertising be permitted, that all they should include a warning about the potential health hazards of vaping products.
  • Support for the proposal that placement and content of advertising and strict considerations on other forms of retail promotion should be banned.
  • Restrict vaping product flavours.
Measures to Reduce Youth Access and Appeal of Vaping Products
Health Canada Consultation Document
May 2019
  • Align nicotine concentrations with the approved nicotine concentrations for Nicotine Replacement Therapy products (e.g. patches, gum, mist, inhalers, and lozenges) that are already approved and regulated as cessation aids in Canada.
  • Further restrict online sales of vapour product to youth.
  • Enhance the verification of age and identity of online purchasers of vapour products are warranted.
  • Apply the same principles and body of evidence to the regulation of vapour products and their packaging, as those which are currently in place for tobacco products.
  • Hold manufacturers of vaping products to the same level of accountability and scrutiny as tobacco product manufacturers, through the enactment of vapour product information and reporting regulations.
  • Dedicate research funding to better understand the potential benefits and risks associated with the use of vapour products.

PROPOSED MOTION

Whereas, the WECHU Board of Health has passed three previous resolutions related to vaping to encourage further regulation at the federal, provincial, and local levels of government;

Whereas, the WECHU has submitted feedback independently and through regional collaborations for the increase in regulations related to vaping products;

Whereas, there is evidence that vaping products have short-term negative health effects and contain harmful chemicals like nicotine;

Whereas, the restrictions on the promotion and display of tobacco products and the removal of tobacco flavouring from the retail marketplace has contributed to the reduction of tobacco smoking among young people;

Whereas, Individuals who do not smoke should not start vaping, especially youth, young adults, pregnant women, and those planning on becoming pregnant;

Whereas, vaping rates among young people have increased 74% between 2017 and 2018;

Whereas, Vaping products have the potential to re-normalize smoking and lead to tobacco use among youth;

Now therefore be it resolved that the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health supports the ban on the promotion of vaping products in the retail setting and online, and

FURTHER THAT, the provincial government further restricts the sale of flavoured vaping products to include only tobacco flavours targeting current smokers who are looking to quit, and

FURTHER THAT, all regulations related to protecting youth and young people from the harms of tobacco smoke be applied to vaping products.

References

  • American Cancer Society. (2019). What do we know about e-cigarettes? Retrieved from American Cancer Society
  • Boak, A. Hamilton, H. A., Adalf, E. M., & Mann, R. E. (2017). Drug use among Ontario students, 1977-2017: Detailed findings from the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) (CAMH Research Document Series No. 46). Toronto, ON: Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2019, 10 08). Smoking and Tobacco Use. Retrieved from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Hammond, D., Reid J. L., Rynard, V. L., Fong G.T., Cummings K. M., McNeill A., et al. (2019).Prevalence of vaping and smoking among adolescents in Canada, England, and the United States: repeat national cross sectional surveys.
  • BMJ; 365 :2219. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l2219
  • Margolis, K. A., Donaldson, E. A., Portnoy, D. B., Robinson, J., Ne, L. J., & Jamal, A. (2018). E-cigarette openness, curiosity, harm perceptions and advertising exposure among U.S. middle and high school students. Preventive Medicine 112(September 2017), 119–125
  • National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2018). Public health consequences of e- cigarettes.Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.17226/24952
  • Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). (2018). Current evidence on e- cigarettes: a summary of potential impacts. Toronto, ON: Queen's Printer ofr Ontario.
  • Smoke-Free Ontario Scientific Advisory Committee, Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). Evidence to guide action: Comprehensive tobacco control in Ontario (2016). Toronto, ON: Queen's Printer for Ontario; 2017.
  • The Ontario Tobacco Research Unit. (2019). Promotion of Flavoured Vaping Products that appeal to Youth. Available here.
  • University of Waterloo. (2017). Canadian student tobacco, alcohol and drugs survey. Retrieved from Canadian Student Tobacco Alcohol Drugs Survey
  • U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. (2018). Public Health Consequences of E-cigarettes.

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September 19, 2019

  1. Call to Order
  2. Agenda Approval
  3. Announcement of Conflict of Interest
  4. Presentation:
    SIS Community Consultation Executive Report (T. Marentette)
  5. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: June 20, 2019
  6. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS
      1. Q2 Financial Results (L. Gregg)
      2. Q2 Operational Planning Status Update (T. Marentette)
      3. Annual Report (L. Gregg)
      4. Data and Cyber Security (L. Gregg)
      5. Environmental Health E-Learning Course (K. McBeth)
      6. Windsor-Essex Food Policy Council and Community Food Assessment (N. Dupuis)
      7. Sexually Transmitted and Blood-Borne Infections in W-E County (K. McBeth)
      8. Media Recap (July-August)
    2. RESOLUTION/RECOMMENDATION REPORTS
      1. Windsor-Essex Food Policy Council (N. Dupuis)
      2. Non-competitive Procurement (L. Gregg)
        1. Dental Renovations
        2. Payroll and Human Resource System
      3. Completion of Consumption and Treatment Services Application and Site Location Consultation (T. Marentette)
  7. Business Arising
  8. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  9. New Business
    1. 2019 Budget Approval (L. Gregg)
    2. CUPE Pay Equity (D. Sibley/T. Marentette)
    3. Letter to Windsor Utilities Commission (Fluoride) (W. Ahmed)
  10. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters – For Support
    1. Sudbury & District Public Health – For Support – Parity of Esteem Position Statement – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott (with Position Statement from Sudbury Health Unit Board)
    2. Council of Ontario Medical Officers of Health – For Support – Alcohol Choice & Convenience – Letter to Hon. Vic Fedeli
    3. Peterborough Public Health – For Support - Funding Cancelled for Leave the Pack Behind – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott
    4. Peterborough Public Health – For Support – Changes to Provincil Autism Supports – Letter to Hon. Lisa McLeod
  11. Committee of the Whole (Closed Session in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act) 66
  12. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair or October 17, 2019 – Windsor
  13. Adjournment

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