Main Page Content

November 15, 2018

2018 Q3 WECHU Strategic Plan Progress - At a Glance

Communication and Awareness

Objective

2018 Q1

2018 Q2

2018 Q3

1.1. 60% of survey respondents are aware of the programs and services offered by the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing Progressing Progressing

1.2 60% of survey respondents have seen or heard about the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing Progressing Progressing

1.3 60% of survey respondents are satisfied with internal communication efforts in the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing Progressing Progressing

Partnerships

Objective

2018 Q1

2018 Q2

2018 Q3

2.1. 100% of program/service driven departments implement a formal feedback process with at least one external partnership by 2021.

Work Needed Progressing Progressing

2.2. At least 20% of activities in the operational plan identify formal internal partnerships by 2021.

Progressing Progressing Progressing

Organizational Development

Objective

2018 Q1

2018 Q2

2018 Q3

3.1. A minimum of 2 organization-wide quality improvement activities will occur annually through to 2021.

Objective Met Objective Met Objective Met

3.2. 100% of the WECHU staff are trained in change management strategies by 2021.

Progressing Progressing Progressing

3.3. 100% of corporate risks identified as high have mitigation strategies developed and implemented by 2021

Progressing Progressing Progressing

3.4. 80% of the WECHU staff have a positive view of organizational culture by 2021.

Progressing Progressing Progressing

Evidence-based Public Health Practice

Objective

2018 Q1

2018 Q2

2018 Q3

4.1. 100% of departments collect corporate level client satisfaction data by 2021.

Progressing Progressing Progressing

4.2. 100% of the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) 2018 program areas have at least one activity focused on healthy public policy development by 2021.

Progressing Progressing Progressing

4.3. 100% of the OPHS population health assessment requirements (7), the research, knowledge exchange, and communication requirements (3) and the related protocols are being addressed by 2021.

Objective Met Objective Met Objective Met

4.4. 100% of our programs and service departments have adopted a health equity approach to an activity by 2021.

Progressing Progressing Progressing

Communication and Awareness

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q3 UPDATE

1.1 Strengthen the community’s awareness of our programs and services by developing and implementing a corporate communications strategy.

60% of survey respondents are aware of the programs and services offered by the WECHU by 2021.

The marketing and communications plan is still to be developed. Five policies and procedures have been developed and are currently under review. The policies address elements of organizational branding across media channels. Work is being done to define the WECHU’s programs and services in order to build the marketing and communications plan.

1.2 Increase the WECHU’s visibility by developing and implementing a community engagement approach.

60% of survey respondents have seen or heard about the WECHU by 2021.

The community engagement plan is still to be developed. An enhanced focus on organizational branding has been implemented.

1.3 Improve communication within the WECHU by developing and implementing an internal communication strategy.

60% of survey respondents are satisfied with internal communication efforts in the WECHU by 2021.

The employee engagement strategy is currently being implemented. Measurements associated with internal communication will be generated in Q4

Partnerships

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q3 UPDATE

2.1 Increase the effectiveness of partnerships through formal feedback mechanisms.

100% of program/service driven departments implement a formal feedback process with at least one external partnership by 2021.

The partnership tool has been developed and finalized. Training for management and staff will begin in November.

2.2 Increase the number of internal partnerships.

At least 20% of activities in the operational plan identify formal internal partnerships by 2021.

19% of work plans included in the 2018 Operational Plan referenced internal partnerships.
The updated planning tool now includes more detail about internal partnerships for the 2019 planning cycle.

Organizational Development

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q3 UPDATE

3.1 Improve performance by striving towards operational excellence and a focus on continuous quality improvement.

A minimum of 2 organization-wide quality improvement activities will occur annually through to 2021.

Four corporate level quality improvement activities have been identified for 2018 and progress for each is as follows:
1. The Risk Registry was updated with mitigation plans incorporated into the 2019 planning approach. 
2. The planning system has been updated to incorporate ministry requirements, and training has been provided to all teams. 
3. Background work on our quality improvement plan approach is in progress. 4. Proposals for potential approaches to maintain AODA adherence have been developed.

3.2 Increase our readiness to adapt to internal and external factors through effective change management practices.

100% of the WECHU staff are trained in change management strategies by 2021.

Exploring options related to ongoing change management training.

3.3 Enhance our understanding and monitoring efforts of identified corporate risks to embrace opportunities, create flexibility, and preserve organizational assets.

 

100% of corporate risks identified as high have mitigation strategies developed and implemented by 2021

A draft risk management template has been released by the MOHLTC regarding risk identification and mitigation strategies. Their template has the same columns as the WECHU’s internal template. Risk identification practices will continue as planned. Key risk indicators have not been developed as of yet.

3.4 Improve organizational culture through people development and employee engagement strategies.

80% of the WECHU staff have a positive view of organizational culture by 2021.

The employee engagement strategy is currently being implemented. Baseline measures for employee engagement are currently being collected. Measurements associated with employee engagement will be generated in Q4.

Evidence-Based Public Health Practice

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q3 UPDATE

4.1 Establish organizational supports for client-centered service strategies.

100% of departments collect corporate level client satisfaction data by 2021.

New methods and technologies are being considered in order to offer health unit clients the opportunity to share their feedback. A survey on the health unit website continues to draw client satisfaction responses at the corporate level. 

4.2 Develop and implement a framework to support healthy public policy.

100% of the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) 2018 program areas have at least one activity focused on healthy public policy development by 2021.

There were four activities focused on healthy public policy completed in Q3 under the Chronic Diseases and Well-being Standard, and the Substance Use and Injury Prevention Standard. There are activities focused on healthy public policy in progress under the Chronic Diseases Prevention and Well-being Standard, Substance Use and Injury Prevention Standard, and the Healthy Environments Standard.

4.3 Enhance local data collection efforts and analysis to support knowledge exchange both internally and externally.

100% of the OPHS population health assessment requirements (7), the research, knowledge exchange, and communication requirements (3) and the related protocols are being addressed by 2021.

The way in which this objective is measured and reported upon is currently under review.

4.4 Develop and implement protocols that ensure all programs and services are using a health equity approach.

100% of our programs and service departments have adopted a health equity approach to an activity by 2021.

100% of departments received a presentation for the launch of the corporate Health Equity Strategy. A narrated video of the presentation was prepared and posted to the intranet.
A 1.5-hour health equity education session was delivered to the Board of Health.
A Health Equity Strategy Communication Plan draft was completed and will be presented to the Leadership Team. 
A Health Equity Strategy Measurement and Reporting Plan is in development.


View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

November 5, 2018

Subject:

October Media Relations Recap Report

October Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

56

Interview Requests

27

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

29

October 2018 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

Story Source

October 2018 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Outlet

Number of Stories

AM 800

12

Blackburn

9

CBC

10

CBC – London

1

CBC – Radio Canada

2

CTV

4

Newswire

1

OurWindsor.ca

2

Rivertown Times

1

St. Clair College

1

Windsor Star

8

windsorite.ca

5

TOTAL

56

News Release and Media Advisories

Date Type Headline Response

October 4, 2018

News Release

Health Unit Launches Cannabis Use Prevention and Safety Campaign

6 Stories Reported

October 5, 2018

News Release

Vote for Health: Municipal Candidates Views on Local Health Issues

1 Story Reported

October 11, 2018

Media Advisory

Oral Health Workshop - A Tale of Two Countries: Access to Oral Health Care in Canada and the U.S.A.

2 Stories Reported

October 12, 2018

Media Advisory

Potassium Iodide (KI) Pill Distribution to Start in Secondary Zone

4 Stories Reported

October 15, 2018

News Release

Potassium Iodide (KI) Pill Distribution to Start in Secondary Zone

4 Stories Reported

October 17, 2018

News Release

Supervised Injection Services - What Do You Think?

5 Stories Reported

October 17, 2018

Media Advisory

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Meeting at Essex Office - October 2018

3 Stories Reported

October 18, 2018

News Release

Local Workplaces Recognized for Commitment to Employee Health and Wellness

0 Stories Reported

October 19, 2018

Media Advisory

Free Parent Information Event during National Teen Driver Safety Week

2 Stories Reported

October 23, 2018

News Release

Protecting Ontarians with Revitalized Smoke-free Ontario Act 2017

5 Stories Reported

October 24, 2018

News Release

It’s Flu Season! Lower Your Risk, Get Immunized.

3 Stories Reported

October 26, 2018

News Release

Food System Community Conversation

1 Story Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

October 3, 2018

City Councillor Questions Health Unit Over Restaurant Closure

October 4, 2018

Local Medical Officer Of Health Defends Health Inspectors

October 4, 2018

Health Unit Wants To Answer Your Questions About Pot

October 15, 2018

Health Professional Emphasize Need For More Dental Care For Adults And Seniors

October 15, 2018

Health Unit Preparing For Legal Weed

October 15, 2018

Windsor Essex Residents To Get Radiation Protection

October 18, 2018

Are Supervised Injection Sites Needed In Windsor-Essex?

October 18, 2018

Health Unit Recommends Windsor-Essex Say No To Retail Pot Stores

October 22, 2018

Health Unit Approves 2019 Budget Increase

October 23, 2018

Stern Message For Parents Of Teen Drivers

October 25, 2018

Smoking Banned From All City Rec Centres

October 29, 2018

WECHU Wants You To Be Prepared For Flu Season

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

October 4, 2018

Union Local Providing 600 Area Families With Thanksgiving Dinner

October 7, 2018

Health Unit Wants To Answer Your Questions About Legal Cannabis

October 8, 2018

Local Candidates Prioritize Local Health Spending In Survey

October 11, 2018

Cannabis information cards being sent to your home

October 15, 2018

KI Pill Distribution Now Expanded

October 15, 2018

Radioactive Prevention Pills To Start Across Windsor-Essex & Chatham-Kent

October 17, 2018

What Do You Think Of Supervised Injection Sites

October 25, 2018

Stricter Smoking Rules Outside Recreational Facilities

October 27, 2018

WRH Prepared For this Flu Season; Are You?

CBC News

(CBC London and CBC Radio-Canada are included in this list)

Publish Date

Title

October 4, 2018

Have A History Of Mental Illness? Pregnant? Avoid Cannabis Altogether, Says Health Unit

October 4, 2018

3 Highlights From Windsor's 1st All-Candidate Mayoral Debate

October 15, 2018

Health Unit Taking Requests For Potassium Iodide Pills This Week

October 17, 2018

Heath Unit Community Survey On Supervised Consumption Site Now Open

October 19, 2018

Windsor-Essex Health Unit Recommends Opting Out Of Private Retail Pot

October 25, 2018

Full Smoking Ban Outside All Public And Private Recreation Facilities

October 28, 2018

Quebecers indifferent to dangers of radon, need to protect their homes, expert warns

Note: Six requests (not listed) from CBC did not result in a reported story that mentioned the Health Unit

CTV News

Publish Date

Title

October 4, 2018

Cannabis Use Prevention And Safety Campaign Launched By Health Unit

October 17, 2018

Anti-Radiation Pill Distribution Begins In Secondary Zone For Windsor-Essex

October 18, 2018

Health Unit Wants Feedback On Supervised Injection Services

October 31, 2018

Feedback wanted on Windsor-Essex food system

Newswire

Publish Date Title

October 3, 2018

CUPE City Workers Team up With Windsor-Essex Food Bank To Deliver Thanksgiving Dinner

OurWindsor.ca

Publish Date Title

October 18, 2018

Windsor Police Join Community Partners During National Teen Driver Safety Week

October 24, 2018

Windsor Recreational Properties Now Completely Smoke Free

Rivertown Times

Publish Date Title

October 15, 2018

Are You Prepared? Sign up to request your Potassium Iodide (KI) pills

Windsor Star

Publish Date Title

October 9, 2018

Four-Plant Limit Won't Limit Giant Pot Harvests, Local Grower Shows

October 12, 2018

Windsor-Essex Health Unit Survey Finds Adults' Oral Health Worse Than Children

October 15, 2018

Essex County Residents Can Obtain Pills To Protect Against Radiation In Nuclear Disaster

October 18, 2018

Health Unit Asks Windsor For 5 Percent Increase, Payne Objects

October 23, 2018

Teens Driving High Should Concern Parents, Health Unit Says

October 25, 2018

Blanket Smoking Ban Outside City Recreation Buildings Applies To Spits Games

October 25, 2018

Health Unit Urging People To Get Flu Shots

October 25, 2018

Windsor Spitfire Fans React To New Smoking Ban At WFCU Centre

Windsorite.ca

Publish Date Title

October 4, 2018

Local Health Unit Launches Cannabis Use Prevention and Safety Campaign

October 5, 2018

Local Municipal Candidates Offer Views on Health Issues

October 15, 2018

Potassium Iodide Pill Distribution To Start For Windsor And Essex County Wednesday

October 17, 2018

Health Unit Wants To Know What You Think Of Supervised Injection Services

October 24, 2018

All Recreational Properties Now Completely Smoke Free

Note: The request from St. Clair College did not result in a publicly available reported story.

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy and Michael Janisse


View Document page

Prepared By:

Dave Jansen, Performance Improvement and Accountability Coordinator, Planning and Strategic Initiatives Department

Date:

November 5, 2018

Subject:

Risk Management

Background

In spring 2018, the Planning and Strategic Initiatives Department was tasked to maintain the corporate risk registry. The new risk registry was approved by the Leadership Team, and an Information Report was submitted to the Board of Health in March 2018 to detail the updates.

Current Initiatives

As part of the Q3 Financial Report to the Ministry, health units have been asked to submit a list of corporate risks and mitigation strategies. The Ministry developed a template to harmonize efforts in tracking risk across the province, using consistent language in documenting corporate risk.

This process builds upon the risk management system the WECHU already has in place. The WECHU risk registry identified 36 risks across 14 categories, with 18 risks scoring “high” before consideration of mitigation strategies. The Ministry requires reporting of up to 10 highly ranked risks. The WECHU’s submission includes the highest ranking risks.

As part of the 2019 operational planning process, work plans were created across the organization for risk mitigation in identified areas. Development of key risk indicators and the commencement of departmental risk categorization will occur next year.

Consultation:

The following individuals contributed to this report:

  • Marc Frey, Planning and Strategic Initiatives
  • Kristy McBeth, Knowledge Management

Approved by:

 Theresa Marentette

 


View Document page

Prepared By:

Dave Jansen, Performance Improvement and Accountability Coordinator, Planning and Strategic Initiatives Department

Date:

November 5, 2018

Subject:

Board of Health Education Sessions – Summer 2018

Background

As per the Ontario Public Health Standards, the Board of Health is required to ensure that board members are aware of their roles and responsibilities and emerging issues and trends by ensuring the development and implementation of a comprehensive orientation plan for new board members and a continuing education program for board members. To this end, the WECHU provides various education sessions to the board of health membership. Topics and frequency are chosen based on identified and perceived need. Two education sessions were held this past summer, on the topics of health equity and the departmental programming updates under the new standards. This report is a summary of the post-session evaluations.

Current Initiatives

July Board of Health Education Session: Health Equity

The first education session was delivered to increase board awareness and competency on the topic of health equity. Health equity was identified as an area needing improvement on the 2017 Board of Health competency-based self-assessment. Objectives of the session were to enhance Board of Health members’ knowledge of key concepts and increase their ability to take health equity promoting approaches. Twelve Board of Health members attended this education session.

After the education session, a survey was distributed to determine if objectives were met, obtain feedback to inform and enhance future sessions, and assess and reinforce key session content. Eleven of the 12 attending board members filled out this survey, all of whom strongly agreed or agreed that the session was worthwhile, stated objectives were met, and the session increased their understanding of ways to help promote health equity.

Furthermore, 91% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed that the session helped them better understand what things make it harder for people to be healthy, and where to find more information about health equity. They also strongly agreed or agreed that the session informed them on approaches the WECHU is taking to reduce health inequities, and increased their confidence to take action in addressing health inequities.

Nearly two thirds (64%) of the respondents indicated that they planned to take action based on what they learned from the session within the next three months. These respondents were prompted to share comments of how they planned to take action, which included actions related to board roles as well as work outside of the organization. Responses included ensuring the WECHU’s operating budget supports programs and services consistent with the Health Equity Plan. There was also discussion on sharing health equity promoting concepts with municipal and workplace colleagues, as well as raising awareness through conversations with other institutions. Respondents also suggested they would act on advancing health equity policies, incorporating knowledge into strategic planning, and incorporating session materials and knowledge into their own presentations.

When asked how they would rate the training overall, all respondents indicated that the training was excellent or very good, and that the speaker presented effectively. Positive remarks about the preparation, knowledge, and enthusiasm conveyed throughout the presentation were shared.

August Board of Health Education Session: Department Updates

The second education session provided an update on recent initiatives in six different health unit departments. Presentations were given by health unit staff on various topics, including the public disclosure system, West Nile Virus/enhanced mosquito surveillance, potassium iodide distribution, school suspensions, school-aged health promotion, migrant farm TB and STBBI testing, mental health, and oral health programming. Eight board of health members attended this session, including one by teleconference. All eight members completed the post-session evaluation survey, on which they all reported the education session was excellent or very good.

Seven of the eight respondents strongly agreed or agreed that the education session was worthwhile, the information was presented clearly and effectively, and that the stated objectives were met. The same number of respondents strongly agreed or agreed that the session satisfied their personal expectations, was relevant to their role as board members, and provided them with new knowledge, which they intended to use.

Five respondents strongly agreed or agreed that the session provided them with new skills, and seven respondents strongly agreed or agreed that they plan to use the skills they’ve learned.

Six respondents (75%) said the session was well organized. When asked what the most useful part of the session was, a common theme was clarity. Respondents wrote that the clarification on roles, responsibilities, and tasks that the WECHU staff undertake was useful, and that it was a good reminder of how much happens at the health unit and the passionate staff at work. Also mentioned was the material that covered relevant legislation, and the information provided about migrant farm workers. 

Respondents were asked how they will apply what they’ve learned to their role on the Board of Health. Respondents said the education session helped them understand what public health does, which will help them in better board decision making, and enrich their discussions at board meetings and with the community. When asked to share any additional comments or suggestions, one said it was a lot of information to pack into one session, since they already have board information reports for each board meeting, there may be the ability to condense. Another said more detail would have been helpful for the number of positive results of zoonotic diseases, in addition to the number of cases investigated. Others commented on the improvement over prior presentations, and complimented the health unit for keeping the board up to date on issues that affect the health and safety of the public.

Lastly, respondents were asked to identify any additional training aspects that would be of interest in their capacity as a Board of Health member. Two respondents suggested a greater explanation of the functions of the board of health after the municipal election takes place, including topics of board governance, board bylaws, Roberts Rules of Order, legislative requirements, and ways to support WECHU leadership and staff. One respondent said that public health represents a huge piece of health care and it deserves a broad educational piece so that the board can appreciate its diversity of programs. Another suggested using the extra time after short meetings for staff to make presentations, whether it’s a new topic or to reinforce what is already known. There was also one comment on having a built environment bike tour around the city to go see the local active transportation facilities and learn about associated health impacts.

Consultation:

The following individuals contributed to this report:

  • Marc Frey, Planning and Strategic Initiatives
  • Jennifer Johnston, Planning and Strategic Initiatives
  • Kristy McBeth, Knowledge Management

Approved by:

 Theresa Marentette

 


View Document page

Prepared By:

Tiffany Gartner-Duff, Performance Improvement & Accountability Coordinator (PIAC), Planning & Strategic Initiatives Department

Date:

November 5, 2018

Subject:

Quarter #3 Planning Report

Background:

Public health units are required to submit an Annual Service Plan (ASP) to the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care (MOHLTC) each year. The Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) requires that “the board of health shall develop and implement a Board of Health Annual Service Plan and Budget Submission to include all programs and services delivered by boards of health and program costing for ministry-funded programs”. The Planning and Strategic Initiatives (PSI) department worked with the Information Technology (IT) department to align our planning system with the MOHLTC requirements to ensure a single, integrated approach to planning for 2019.

Current Initiatives:

Beginning in June 2018, the PSI department provided planning training sessions with staff and management from all divisions. The PSI department then worked with departments to align the 2019 organizational planning outcomes with the MOHLTC requirements, and to ensure consistency in the work plans across the organization. Staff members developed and entered their work plans for 2019; the work plans were then reviewed and approved by the leadership team.

During this quarter, the WECHU received feedback from the MOHLTC from the 2018 ASP submission and was able to incorporate suggested changes for improvement into the 2019 ASP. The MOHLTC has yet to provide the complete standard reporting structures for the 2019 ASP. Pending the receipt of the updated templates, the PSI department will work with IT to integrate these requirements into the planning system.

Consultation:

The following individuals contributed to this report:

  • Kristy McBeth, Knowledge Management
  • Marc Frey, Planning and Strategic Initiatives

Approved by:

 Theresa Marentette

 


View Document page

Prepared By:

Tiffany Gartner-Duff, Performance Improvement & Accountability Coordinator (PIAC), Planning & Strategic Initiatives Department

Date:

November 5, 2018

Subject:

Q3 Strategic Plan Report 

Background:

The 2017-2021 WECHU Strategic Plan identifies key roles, priorities, and directions for the organization. It sets out what we plan to do, how we plan to do it, and how we will measure our progress. The Strategic Plan outlines opportunities to enhance our delivery of quality public health programs and services to all residents in Windsor and Essex County. The Strategic Plan is based on WECHU’s values of: Accountability, Empowerment, Leadership, Collaboration, and Equity, which underpin the plan’s four strategic priorities: Communication and Awareness, Partnerships, Organizational Development, and Evidence-Based Public Health Practice.

The Ontario Public Health Standards (2018), under the Good Governance and Management Practices Domain states that “the Board of Health shall provide governance direction to the administration and ensure that the board of health remains informed about the activities of the organization on the following: organizational effectiveness through evaluation of the organization and strategic planning”.  In alignment with fulfilling this Ministry requirement, in early 2018 the Planning and Strategic Initiatives department implemented a corporate tracking system to monitor Strategic Plan performance and to provide quarterly and annual updates to the Board of Health. In the first and second quarters of 2018, progress was made on a number of objectives, while more work was needed to move others forward.

Current Initiatives:

The 2018 Q3 Strategic Plan Progress Report provides the objectives under each strategic priority with corresponding Q3 updates to measure our advancement towards achieving the goal. The colour-coded state for most of the objectives remained consistent from Q2, however progress has continued on most of the strategic objectives. Many are new initiatives which are multi-year strategies and difficult to achieve 100% compliance at this point in time. That being said, the WECHU is on-track towards achieving all objectives by 2021.

Consultation:

The following individuals contributed to this report:

  • Kristy McBeth, Director, Knowledge Management
  • Marc Frey, Manager, Planning & Strategic Initiatives
  • Michael Janisse, Manager, Communications
  • Jennifer Johnston, Health Promotion Specialist, Planning & Strategic Initiatives
  • Jessica Kipping-Labute, Policy Advisor, Planning & Strategic Initiatives
  • Dave Jansen, Performance Improvement and Accountability Coordinator, Planning & Strategic Initiatives

Approved by:

 Theresa Marentette

 


View Document page

Board Members Present:

Joe Bachetti, Dr. Ken Blanchette, Dr. Deborah Kane, Judy Lund, Bill Marra, Gary McNamara, Gord Queen, John Scott, Ed Sleiman

Board Member Regrets:

Paul Borrelli, Mark Carrick, Richard Meloche, Dr. Carlin Miller, Hilary Payne, Michelle Watters

Administration Present:

Theresa Marentette, Dr. Wajid Ahmed, Lorie Gregg, Dan Sibley, Lee Anne Damphouse

Administration Regrets: 

Nicole Dupuis, Kristy McBeth

Introduction:  T. Marentette introduced and welcomed the newest WECHU Manager, Felicia Lawal, Manager of Health Families Department.

T. Marentette also advised Board of Health members that there are KI Pills (Potassium Iodide) available at the meeting and if anyone wishes to obtain to please register accordingly.

  1. Call to Order
    The meeting was called to order at 4:05 p.m.
  2. Agenda Approval
    It was moved
    That the agenda be approved - CARRIED
  3. Announcement of Conflicts of Interest – None.
  4. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: October 18, 2018
      It was moved
      That the minutes be approved - CARRIED
  5. Presentation – Topical Issues: Dr. Wajid Ahmed
    Opioid Related Morbidity and Mortality in Windsor-Essex County
    Dr. Wajid Ahmed provided information to the Board on problematic drug use in our communities, noting the sudden spike in the use of various drugs.  How did this happen?  The sudden increase stems from several factors, one being psychological, social and biological risk factors like genetics, mental health, early life experiences, trauma, poverty, lack of secure housing and other determinants of health.  Another factor is the misunderstanding of the addictive risk of prescribed opioids.  Previously, in the 1990’s, pharmaceutical companies designed opioids that reduced pain and symptoms, though lack of awareness of alternative treatments for pain led to, in some cases, over-prescribing, as well as unintended consequences such as addiction.

    The lack of access to prescribed opioids has led to theft of prescription opioids by friends and family members and illicit opioid use.  Illegal drugs are frequently laced with other substances like fentanyl leading to serious, and sometimes fatal, consequences.

    Addiction vs Dependence
    Addiction
    A chronic, relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use despite harmful consequences, as well as the drug providing desired euphoric effects

    Dependence
    A condition that can occur with regular use of drugs even if prescribed and used as prescribed. Characterized by withdrawal symptoms when stopped – a person can be dependent without being addicted but dependence sometimes leads to addiction

    Public health’s role in this complex problem is leveraging our partnerships. By collaborating and coordinating with other various organizations we can all be part of the solution through harm reduction activities, i.e. clean needle distribution, naloxone distribution, SIS/Consumption sites, and the advocacy piece for more funding and more resources for our communities.  Data collection from various agencies pulled together help to paint a better picture of what is happening in our region. Short term steps are sharing data with relevant agencies and advocating for funding for treatment and rehabilitation/harm reduction services.

    What is happening here is a significant problem and it is happening across the country.  In 2016, WECHU formed the Windsor Essex Community Opioid Strategy Leadership Committee (WECOS-LC) to develop community wide response focusing on opioid related morbidity and mortality, and to ensure implementation across multiple sectors and address the following four pillars of the WECOS:
    1) Prevention/Education
    2) Harm Reduction
    3) Treatment
    4) Enforcement

    This leadership is tasked with ensuring the feasibility of suggested interventions as well as assisting in the implementation of effective, local and sustainable solutions for opioid use and overdose prevention.  Effort was made to include people with lived experience to ensure they have direct input into the high-level planning of the strategy.

    T. Marentette is currently conducting Key Stakeholder Interviews as part of the Supervised Injection Services Community Consultation study.  The purpose of this study is to:
    • Look at how the community in Windsor view supervised injection services and identify any concerns
    • Explore potential clients’ willingness to use supervised injection services
    • Identify how the services should be delivered to meet the needs of people who inject drugs

    This study will help with decisions about supervised injection services and identify any questions or concerns.

    Various discussion continued on Naloxone distribution.  EMS are equipped with Naloxone but Fire and Police Services do not. In order to save lives First Responders need to be equipped with Naloxone and we need to be able to provide services where people can safely inject drugs – Windsor is not one of those sites that have been approved.

    Rapid Action Addition Medicine Clinics (RAAM) are medical clinics for individuals who are looking for help in regards to their substance use. The doctors at these clinics have experience treating individuals struggling with alcohol or opioid use. Doctors assess each individual and develop a treatment plan accordingly, and referrals to community organizations for further support can be arranged.  These clinics have been implemented in many communities, but not in Windsor.  We need to increase our budget to cover costs within our communities, and when we do request more funding/resources we need to have a game plan and accurate data.  The Board of Health will be kept informed of any progress and if further funding from the Ministry is not forthcoming, we may need to speak with our local funders.

    In closing Dr. Ahmed noted that the Windsor-Essex region needs more treatment and rehabilitation services so people who need them can be guided to treatment.

  6. Consent Agenda:
    1. Information Reports
      The following information reports were presented to the Board.
      1. Q3 Strategic Plan Report/Q3 Strategic Plan Progress Report
      2. Q3 Planning Report
      3. BOH Education Sessions – Summer 2019
      4. Risk Management

      It was moved
      That the information reports be received. - CARRIED

  7. Business Arising – None
  8. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  9. New Business – None
  10. Board Correspondence/Other Health Unit Letters/Resolutions
    1. alPha – Update to BOH Members – For Information – October 26, 2018 – various links and items of interest
    2. Opioid Crisis – National Drug Strategy – For Support - Southwestern Public Health – Oxford, Elgin, St. Thomas – Letter to Hon. Premier Doug Ford
      It was moved
      That the above correspondence be Supported and Received - CARRIED
  11. Committee of the Whole (CLOSED SESSION, in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
    It was moved
    That the Board move into Committee of the Whole at 4:57 p.m. - CARRIED
    It was moved
    That the Board move out of Committee of the Whole at 5:15 p.m. - CARRIED
  12. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or December 20, 2018 in Windsor, Ontario
  13. Adjournment
    The meeting adjourned at 5:20 pm.

RECORDING SECRETARY:

SUBMITTED BY:

APPROVED BY:


View Document page

October 18, 2018

Flu Vaccines will be available for Board of Health members from 3:30 pm – 4:00 pm

  1. Call to Order
  2. Agenda Approval
  3. Announcement of Conflict of Interest
  4. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting:  September 20, 2018
  5. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS:
      1. Budget – Recommendation Report  (L. Gregg)
        • Resolution Recommendation
      1. Cannabis – Recommendation Report (N. Dupuis)
        • Resolution Recommendation
      1. Vote for Health Survey Results (T. Marentette)
      2. Community Partners List 2018 (T. Marentette)
      3. September Media Relations Recap (K. McBeth)
  6. Business Arising
    1. PGC Capital Project Update (T. Marentette)
  7. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  8. New Business
    1. Staff Appreciation (D. Sibley)
  9. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters – For Support/Information
    1. Smoke-Free Ontario Act – For Support
      1. alPHa – Letter to Laura Pisko, MOHLTC
      2. Peterborough Public Health – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott
    2. Ontario’s Basic Income Pilot – For Support/Information
      1. Windsor-Essex County Health Unit – For Information – Letter to Hon. Lisa McLeod
      2. Southwestern Public Health – For Support – Letter to Hon. Lisa McLeod
    3. Why Ontario Needs a Chronic Disease Prevention Strategy – For Support
      1. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott
    4. Drug Policy – For Support
      1. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health – Letter to Right Hon. Justin Trudeau
    5. Repeal of Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada – For Support
      1. Southwestern Public Health – Letter to Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould
    6. Dedicated Funding for Local Public Health Agencies – Cannabis Sales – For Support
      1. Middlesex-London Health Unit – Letter to Premier Doug Ford
    7. Displays and Promotion of Vaping Products in Convenience Stores and Gas Bars – For Information
      1. Ontario Campaign for Action on Tobacco (OCAT) – Media Release
  10. Committee of the Whole (Closed Session in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act) 77
  11. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or November 15, 2018 –  Windsor
  12. Adjournment

View Document page

Prepared By:

Melissa Valentik, Health Promotion Specialist

Eric Nadalin, Manager, Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention

Date:

October 5, 2018

Subject:

Non-Medical Cannabis Legalization

Background

Cannabis is currently the most commonly used illegal substance in Canada (CCSA, 2017). Approximately 15.7% of Ontario residents self-reported cannabis use within 12 months (CAMH, 2016).  In Windsor and Essex County, approximately 28, 900 residents used cannabis in the last year. Among those who consume cannabis, rates are highest among youth and young adults (WECHU, 2016). With legalization of cannabis, effective October 17, it is anticipated that the number of residents that report using cannabis will rise given the social acceptability of cannabis use.

Although cannabis smoke contains similar toxins to those found in tobacco smoke including those that are associated with cancer, as well as heart and respiratory disease, the harms of cannabis consumption extend beyond those directly associated with long-term chronic disease. Increased rates of injury or harms associated with impaired driving, falls or general impairment, damage to cognitive functioning (i.e., memory, focus, ability to think and learn), depression, anxiety, psychosis, and addiction are all associated with cannabis use. These harms increase when cannabis use begins prior to the age of 25, as well as with frequent or heavy use (CCSA, 2016, Parachute Vision Zero Network, 2018). Lastly, maternal cannabis use is linked to low birth weight, pregnancy complications, and may affect children’s cognitive functioning, behaviour, mental health and future substance use (Best Start, 2017).

The process leading toward legalization began In December 2015, when the Government of Canada announced its commitment to legalize, regulate, and restrict access to non-medical cannabis in Canada, with the intent to keep cannabis out of the hands of children and the profits out of the hands of criminals. In response, the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health passed a resolution on January 14, 2016 supporting a public health approach to cannabis legalization, including strong health-centered and age-restricted regulations to reduce the health and social harms associated with cannabis use. In addition, the resolution mandated the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit support the development of healthy public policies and enforcement of future regulations to ensure minimal negative effects on public health and safety. The federal government introduced Bill C-45, the Cannabis Act, in April of 2017. This legislation would legalize access to non-medical (i.e., recreational) cannabis in Canada and provide a foundation of regulations on which provincial/territorial governments could develop more specific controls for how cannabis is grown, distributed, and sold in their provinces and territories. The federal Cannabis Act contains the following baseline regulations:

  • restricts youth access to cannabis by prohibiting sale or supply to anyone under the age of 18;
  • applies a personal possession limit of no more than 30g;
  • limits personal cultivation to a maximum of four plants per household;
  • prohibits packaging or labelling which makes cannabis products appealing to youth;
  • requires standardized serving sizes and potency, and
  • allows for only certain cannabis products to be offered for sale (i.e., dried cannabis, oils, and seeds), with others to be permitted at a later date (i.e., edibles).

In anticipation of further provincial regulation, the Windsor-Essex Board of Health passed a second resolution which aimed to better position municipalities to prepare in the context of federal and provincial regulation. This resolution, passed in October 2017, provided Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (WECHU) the mandate to prepare and protect our community from potential harms of cannabis legalization by:

  1. Encouraging Windsor-Essex municipalities to develop strict licensing, planning, and zoning regulations,
  2. Working with enforcement agencies and municipalities to support smoking prohibitions, and
  3. Promoting Canada’s Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines to reduce harms of cannabis use.

Building on the foundation of regulations provided by the federal government, the Province of Ontario passed the provincial Cannabis Act on December 12, 2017 to further refine the legal sale and use of cannabis in Ontario by applying the following broad set of controls:

  • restricts sale, purchase, possession, and sharing of cannabis to age 19 or older (consistent with the minimum age for obtaining alcohol); and
  • allows for the purchase and possession of up to 30 grams (about one ounce) of dried cannabis at one time;
  • permits the smoking and vaping of cannabis anywhere the smoking of tobacco is permitted; and
  • allows for the growth of up to four plants per household for personal use.

Recently, the provincial government released its plan for retail sale of cannabis in Ontario. The provincially controlled Ontario Cannabis Retail Corporation (OCRC) will be the exclusive online retailer of cannabis in Ontario as well as the exclusive wholesaler of cannabis products to private retailers across the province. Online sale will be the only legal means through which consumers will be able to access cannabis in Ontario as of October 17th, with retail storefronts to be permitted beginning in April 2019. The licensing and enforcement of regulations for private retail businesses will be the responsibility of the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO) and currently, there is no plan to set a cap on the number of licenses that will be issued in a particular area or municipality. Municipalities have the opportunity to “OPT OUT” of permitting cannabis retail outlets in their communities with a deadline of January 22nd, 2019 to submit this decision. Store authorizations will be permitted in areas that do not opt out, but each application will be subject to a 15-day consultation period for public to input to be considered by the AGCO in granting an authorization for a given location. In addition, the proposed legislation currently leaves no room for municipal control in the form of licensing or zoning for retail storefronts which would allow municipalities to determine appropriate areas for locations based on the unique needs of their municipalities.

Under the proposed provincial retail model, private retailers would be licensed to operate by the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO), which will issue a Retail Operator License, a Retail Store Authorization, and Cannabis Retail Manager Licence to authorized individuals. The AGCO will conduct compliance and audit processes, including store inspection prior to opening. The proposed provincial legislation would also establish due diligence requirements and specific eligibility criteria for the issuance of licenses and involve a public consultation process for each retail establishment. Store operating parameters are set to be established by regulations prior to the AGCO receiving applications for licenses beginning at the end of 2018. The proposed legislation also proposes distance buffers between retail storefronts and schools, which would also be set through regulation.

There are clear areas for intervention from a public health perspective, which would decrease harms associated with this new framework for cannabis sale in Ontario communities. With respect to Windsor and Essex County, the OPT OUT approach would certainly provide the greatest level of protections to residents by prohibiting the operation of retail outlets across the region. Such a model would prevent municipalities from competing with one another for revenue, while ensuring that vulnerable populations would not be exposed to cannabis retail in Windsor-Essex. Should opting out on a permanent basis not be the appetite of incoming municipal councils, the possibility of opting out on a temporary basis should be strongly encouraged. Such an opportunity would provide municipalities the opportunity to learn from others across the province who did not choose to opt out, learn more about their options upon the passing of the final provincial regulations, and consider (to the extent which is permitted by the provincial legislation) the possibility of establishing regulations at the local level to establish appropriate areas for retail storefronts in their communities. Additional advocacy activities should be implemented at the municipal level to provide for the opportunity for such regulations at the local level, rather than the black and white Opt in or Opt out model proposed at the provincial level. See the attached Board of Health Resolution for additional recommendations for provincial and municipal oversight.

In-kind resources have been allocated from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit’s cost-shared budget to begin educating the public about the health implications of cannabis use, safer consumption practices, how to speak with children, impaired driving, and other key message areas ahead of legalization. Additionally, the Smoke-free Ontario Act 2017 is set to come into effect as well on October 17th. Recent amendments to this Act permit the consumption of medical and non-medical cannabis anywhere where the smoking of tobacco is permitted. This will add to the enforcement role and broaden the scope of responsibility for Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Tobacco Enforcement Officers. These two activities alone will burden the WECHU with additional costs tied to legalization, in addition to those which may be required to be added in the form of human resources to respond to cannabis legalization and address the potential harms to health and safety.

WECHU Activities to Date

Internal Health Promotion Collaboration – WECHU Cannabis Legalization Working Group

The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit’s Cannabis Legalization Working Group (CLWG) is a collaborative of staff from various departments that aims to mitigate the potential harms of cannabis legalization across broad target populations. The group convened in 2017 and is Chaired by the Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention department, with representation from Policy and Strategic Initiatives, Epidemiology and Evaluation, Communications, Healthy Schools, and Healthy Families departments. Guided by the findings of a situational assessment, the CLWG has established key messages and target populations for cannabis health promotion efforts.

Internal Staff Training and Knowledge Assessment

A survey was distributed to staff of the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit to assess their knowledge and confidence in speaking to clients or community partners related to key cannabis health messages. Findings were used to identify areas of training that would best prepare staff for engaging with their clients. Following this, training for all direct-client service departments provided an overview of the resources available, and WECHU’s key messages. Based on the unique populations served by staff in each department, additional information was provided (e.g., information regarding risks to pregnant and breastfeeding women for Healthy Families, youth-focused information for Healthy Schools).

Community Environmental Scan

In August, 2018, an environmental scan was disseminated to health and social service providers, school boards, law enforcement and emergency services to assess the work currently being done in Windsor-Essex County to address cannabis use disorders or prevention efforts, and gaps in efforts to reduce cannabis harms in Windsor and Essex County.

Cannabis Mass Media Campaign

A mass media campaign has been created to begin educating the public utilizing a variety of media to target priority populations. This campaign will largely make use of content housed on the WECHU website. The goal of WECHU’s Cannabis- Your Questions, Answered campaign is to direct residents to credible, evidence-informed information in a format that encourages sharing through online and social networks. The website contains information related to key messages, a directory of treatment options for cannabis use and other addictions, and resources for workplaces, healthcare providers, and educators. In addition, radio ads have been created to disseminate our key messages and expand the campaign reach, and billboards have been developed to promote safe driving.

Community Outreach and Presentations

As a supplement to the mass media campaign, WECHU staff have already begun delivering community presentations and distributing resources. For example, in June of 2018, two presentations were provided at the Erie St. Clair Regional Cancer Program Frontline Connect events. In addition, a presentation was given to attendees of the Working Toward Wellness Luncheon in June 2018, along with the hosting of an information and resource booth.

Current and Future Initiatives

Windsor-Essex Cannabis Community of Practice

The Windsor-Essex Cannabis Community of Practice will be led by WECHU and meet biannually, starting in 2019, for the purposes of information sharing, collaboration, and capacity building. Group members have been identified through the Environmental Scan with representatives from health, social and community services, and education and municipal services. Meetings of the Community of Practice will include provincial/federal updates related to cannabis legalization, information sharing among members on current community activities, identifying gaps in community services related to legalization, combining resources and identifying opportunities to collaborate, and building capacity to address cannabis use.

Municipal Engagement

Through connecting with representatives from the administration of each municipality, WECHU has provided recommendations on how they can address cannabis in their communities. Primarily, it is the goal of these engagements to encourage municipalities to opt out of retail establishments; however, in the event that this is not of interest, WECHU is committed to supporting municipalities through the development of local regulations which will place restrictions on the areas in which cannabis-related businesses are permitted to operate. Such regulations may involve licensing or zoning parameters, which restrict cannabis-related businesses to operate in areas near schools, addictions facilities, parks, playgrounds, and other areas that serve or are frequented by vulnerable populations.

Teachers, Schools, and School Boards

Ongoing discussion and meetings between WECHU and school board liaisons have led to the population of an online drop box with presentations, toolkits, curriculum supports, posters, resources, and background information on the dangers of cannabis consumption for young people. A letter of support was provided for School Board advocacy of zoning for the location of cannabis retailers and production facilities to have municipalities set minimum distance between such establishments and school property. Support has also been offered onsite at school events and during teacher professional development opportunities, with additional school-aged presentations planned for the 2018-2019 school year that focus on cannabis-impaired driving. Cannabis activities in the school setting have also been integrated with the Windsor-Essex Community Opioid and Substance Strategy through the development of a Youth Engagement Strategy as part of their work in general substance use prevention and education.

Employers and Workplaces

The WECHU has supported workplaces in preparing for legalization by attending community events and developing template resources for employers to utilize in setting up health-promoting education and environments for their employees. By communicating with employers through existing communication channels and continuing to attend community events, WECHU will provide resources for employers to utilize in making decisions related to cannabis and impairment in the workplace.

Social Service and Healthcare Providers

To support reproductive healthcare providers and reach clients through WECHU and community programs, WECHU has utilized resources developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada to their clients through various programs offered through WECHU’s Healthy Families Department (i.e., hospital liaison program, Physician Outreach Program, Healthy Babies Healthy Children, lactation support, Well Baby Clinics and Building Blocks for Better Babies). Additional resources developed by WECHU and gathered from external partners will be provided through other WECHU networks such as the Windsor-Essex Cannabis Community of Practice, and the Windsor-Essex Tobacco Cessation Community of Practice.

Ongoing Surveillance and Monitoring

Currently, WECHU staff contribute to the Ontario Public Health Collaboration on Cannabis Indicators Working Group which seeks to identify existing indicators for cannabis use and related health outcomes and support development of cannabis surveillance at regional and provincial levels. Locally, ongoing work is being done to assess existing local data for cannabis-related health outcomes that can be used to monitor cannabis health outcomes pre and post-legalization, and identify gaps and opportunities for new data collection methods.

Provincial Collaboration

The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit is a co-applicant for the Public Health Ontario Substance Use Locally Driven Collaborative Project. The focus of this project is to identify regional strategies employed by public health agencies and applicable partners in addressing cannabis use among 18-25 year olds. This age often represents the highest rate of cannabis use, is not protected by age restrictions under the federal Cannabis Act, and is still at risk for cognitive damage tied to consumption due to continued brain development at this age. In addition, WECHU attends bi-monthly meetings as part of the Ontario Public Health Collaboration on Cannabis and through this network of public health professionals working in cannabis health promotion, is able to share and gather information on existing strategies and key message areas with public health units across the province.

Approved By:

Theresa Marentette, CEO

References

 

 


View Document page

Prepared By:

Jessica Kipping-Labute

Date:

October 18, 2018

Subject:

“Vote for Health” Municipal Election Survey Results

Background

Municipal governments and elected representatives can shape the health of communities through the design and delivery of local policies, programs, and services. The Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) and the Windsor Essex County Health Unit’s (WECHU) Strategic Plan both include a focus on developing, supporting, and participating in local healthy public policy. The Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) specify that Public Health Units (PHUs) are to share healthy public policy recommendations, and participate with stakeholders in the development of public policy that reduces barriers to positive health outcomes. The OPHS also specifies that PHUs are to use data to influence and inform the development of local healthy public policies.

On September 5th, the WECHU launched a voluntary survey distributed to all local council and mayoral candidates running in the upcoming 2018 municipal election. The survey asked candidates how they would prioritize their efforts based on seven local public health priority areas. The priority areas were identified based on local data, results from the WECHU’s 2016 Community Needs Assessment, and the Association of Local Public Health Agencies’ (alPHa) Municipal Election Policy Priorities document. The results of the survey were posted on the WECHU’s website on October 5th.

Results Summary

Candidates were asked how they would spend $100 on the local public health issues. In total, 50% (87) of the candidates completed the survey. They were told that their answers should reflect the amount of time and resources they would give to each public health issue. All candidates that completed the survey said that they would allocate resources towards mental illness. On average, candidates provided 25% ($25.49) of their resources to mental health in the community. The second highest allocation (16%; $16.21) was towards substance misuse in the community.

When candidates gave resources to one of the local public health issues, they were then able to select actions they might take. The actions provided were evidence-supported ways to address the local public health issues.

  • Mental illness had the most frequently selected actions – 89% of candidates said they would advocate for funding for low-or no-cost mental health care to increase local access to treatment; and 87% would support training for first responders and front-line service providers to help people living with mental illness.
  • Food insecurity had the third most frequently selected action – 84% of candidates said that they would support local programs, such as farmer’s markets, community gardens, and community kitchens.
  • Putting fluoride into community water was the least selected action by respondents, with 8% of supporting this action.
  • Substance misuse had the second and third least frequently selected actions – 28% of respondents supported local efforts to investigate the feasibility of safe injection sites; and 38% supported increasing the availability of naloxone and needle disposal bins in the community.

Next Steps

The results from this survey were posted on the WECHU’s website to provide information to the public about municipal candidate stances on healthy public policy issues. The results from the survey will also be used to inform future planning and program development within the WECHU. In 2019 the WECHU will provide an opportunity to all elected municipal officials to meet with the organizations CEO to discuss local healthy public policy issues.

Consultation:

The following individuals contributed to this report:

  • Kristy McBeth, Director, Knowledge Management Division
  • Marc Frey, Manager, Planning & Strategic Initiatives Department

Approved By:

Theresa Marentette, CEO


View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

October 1, 2018

Subject:

September Media Relations Recap Report

August Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

45

Interview Requests

21

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

24

September 2018 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

Story Source

September 2018 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Outlet

Number of Stories

AM 800

8

Blackburn

11

CBC

7

CBC – Radio Canada

1

CTV

7

St. Clair College

1

Windsor Star

5

windsorite.ca

5

TOTAL

45

News Release and Media Advisories

Date Type Headline Response

September 4, 2018

Heat Warning

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Issues Extended Heat Warning

2 Stories Reported

September 5, 2018

News Release

Vote for Health: Municipal Candidates Asked to Share Their Views on Local Health Issues

1 Story Reported

September 14, 2018

News Release

Death Related to West Nile Virus Confirmed

5 Stories Reported

September 18, 2018

Media Advisory

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Meeting

3 Stories Reported

September 19, 2018

News Release

Students in Senior Kindergarten to Grade 5 with Incomplete Immunization Records Suspended from School Today

9 Stories Reported

September 20, 2018

News Release

Register for the Screen-Free Meal Time Challenge today!

0 Stories Reported

September 21, 2018

News Release

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Confirms Selection of New Medical Officer of Health and Chief Executive Officer

3 Stories Reported

September 24, 2018

News Release

Windsor-Essex Joins World Rabies Day Activities By Offering Low-Cost Rabies Vaccine Clinics

3 Stories Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

September 10, 2018

Health Unit Looks For Feedback From Municipal Candidates

September 14, 2018

Windsor-Essex Resident Dies Of The West Nile Virus

September 18, 2018

Lynn Martin - 10AM – Immunization Deadline In Windsor

September 19, 2018

Parents Pack Health Unit To Update Immunization

September 24, 2018

A New Medical Officer Of Health For Windsor-Essex

September 25, 2018

Questions Remain Ahead of Pot Legalization

Note: Two requests from AM 800 do not have a reported story. The station chose not to broadcast the stories.

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

September 2, 2018

No swimming recommended at three local beaches this week

September 4, 2018

Stifling heat prompts extended heat warning

September 10, 2018

Suicide Awareness Raised In Windsor-Essex

September 12, 2018

No Swimming At Four Recommended At Four Local Beaches This Week

September 14, 2018

West Nile virus claims local victim

September 14, 2018

Hep A Scare In Michigan Prompts Vaccination Clinic In Windsor

September 14, 2018

Walk Promotes Suicide Prevention One Step At A Time

September 19, 2018

School Suspensions Start Today For Kids Who Are Not Vaccinated

September 20, 2018

Health Unit Seeks To Clear The Air On Weed Guidelines

September 23, 2018

Health Unit Make Top Executive Positions Permanent

September 25, 2018

Veterinarians Offer Low Cost Rabies Vaccine Clinics

CBC News

Publish Date

Title

September 4, 2018

Windsor's heat warning extended to Wednesday

September 10, 2018

Mosquito Trap Tests Positive For West Nile Virus In Chatham-Kent

September 17, 2018

Meet The People Running For Council In Windsor

September 21, 2018

Swimmers Beware, More Warnings For West Belle River Beach Than Others

September 19, 2018

578 Students In Windsor-Essex Suspended Due To Incomplete Immunization Records

September 21, 2018

8 Opioid-Related Deaths In Windsor-Essex January To March This Year

Note: We were unable to conduct an interview for one of the requests from CBC.

CBC - Radio Canada (French)

Publish Date

Title

September 19, 2018

Vaccination : près de 600 élèves suspendus dans Windsor-Essex

CTV News

Publish Date

Title

September 13, 2018

Time running out for parents to update immunization records

September 14, 2018

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Confirms Death Related To West Nile Virus

September 14, 2018

Mosquitoes From Chatham-Kent Trap Test Positive For West Nile Virus

September 19, 2018

Over 500 Windsor-Essex Students Suspended Due To Incomplete Immunization Records

September 21, 2018

More Questions Than Answers About Legalized Marijuana

September 24, 2018

Used Needle Found By Students At Windsor School

September 28, 2018

Some Windsor-Essex Vets Offering Low-Cost Rabies Vaccine Clinics

Windsor Star

Publish Date Title

September 16, 2018

First Local West Nile Death Of The Year Confirmed

September 19, 2018

Hundreds Of Students Suspended For Incomplete Immunization Records

September 20, 2018

Students Discover Discarded Syringe In Schoolyard

September 24, 2018

$30 Rabies Shots Available For Dogs, Cats On World Rabies Day

Note: We were unable to comment on one interview request since it was outside the scope of public health.

Windsorite.ca

Publish Date Title

September 13, 2018

Final Weekend Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended Four Local Beaches

September 14, 2018

One Person Dies From West Nile Virus

September 14, 2018

Health Unit Holding Hepatitis A Vaccination Clinic For Those Who Attended The Michigan Renaissance Festival

September 19, 2018

Over 500 Students Suspended For Incomplete Immunization Records

September 21, 2018

News Medical Officer Of Health And Chief Executive Officer Chosen To Lead Health Unit

Note: The request from St. Clair College will not appear in their student media channels until October.

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy and Michael Janisse


View Document page

On an annual basis, the WECHU prepares its operating budgets for review and approval by its Board.  The budget approval then becomes the foundation for the Annual Service Plan and Budget Submissions to the MOHLTC and MCYS. The due date for the 2019 Annual Service Plan and Budget Submission to the MOHLTC is March 1, 2019. The due date for the Budget Submission to MCYS is April 30, 2019.

Should you require this report in an alternative format, please contact the Health Unit.

File icon 2019 Budget Report - PDF
View Document page

Background

On September 5th, the Windsor Essex County Health Unit (WECHU) distributed a voluntary survey to all local council and mayoral candidates running in the 2018 municipal election. The survey asked candidates how they would prioritize their efforts based on seven local public health priority areas. These areas included: dental health, substance misuse, food insecurity, mental illness, built environment, and climate change. These priority areas were identified based on local data, results from the WECHU’s 2016 Community Needs Assessment, and the Association of Local Public Health Agencies’ (alPHa) Municipal Election Policy Priorities document. This approach was adapted with permission from the Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit, and was modified to address locally relevant issues. The results of the survey were posted on the WECHU’s website on October 5th.

Demographics

The survey was sent to all 174 mayoral and councillor candidates from Amherstburg, Essex, Kingsville, Lakeshore, Lasalle, Leamington, Tecumseh, and Windsor. In total, 50% (87) of the candidates completed the survey. There were more respondents from Essex County than the City of Windsor.

Table 1: Respondents by position

Position

# of candidates

# of respondents

Mayor

19

8 (42%)

Deputy Mayor

16

11 (69%)

Councillor

139

68 (49%)

Total

174

87 (50%)

Table 2: Respondents by municipality

Municipality

# of candidates

# of respondents

Amherstburg

20

11 (55%)

Essex

19

8 (42%)

Kingsville

17

12 (71%)

Lakeshore

25

14 (56%)

Lasalle

12

5 (42%)

Leamington

19

10 (53%)

Tecumseh

12

9 (75%)

Windsor

50

18 (36%)

Total

174

87

Resource Allocation

Candidates were asked how they would spend $100 on the identified local public health issues. They were told that their answers should reflect the amount of time and resources they would give to each topic in their community.

All candidates that completed the survey said that they would allocate resources towards mental illness. On average, candidates provided 25% of their resources to mental health in the community (in relation to the other six public health issue areas). The second highest allocation was towards substance misuse in the community; on average candidates provided 16% of their resources to the issue.

Table 3: Average dollar amount per health issue

Health Topic

$

Mental illness

25.49

Substance misuse

16.21

Built environment

13.76

Food insecurity

13.28

Health inequity

13.14

Dental health

9.55

Climate change

8.57

Vote for Health - Total dollar amount per health issue

Candidate Actions

When candidates gave resources to one of the local public health issues, they were then able to select actions they might take. These actions are evidence-supported ways to address the local public health issues.

  • Mental illness had the two highest actions selected; where 89% of candidates said they would advocate for funding for low-or no-cost mental health care to increase local access to treatment, and 87% would support training for first responders and front-line service providers to help people living with mental illness.
  • Food insecurity had the third highest selected action; where 84% of candidates said that they would support local programs, such as farmer’s markets, community gardens, and community kitchens. However, overall food insecurity had the fourth lowest average dollar amount ($13.28) allocated.
  • Putting fluoride into community water was the least selected by respondents.
  • Substance misuse had the second and third lowest selected action; about 28% of respondents supported local efforts to investigate the feasibility of safe injection sites, and 38% supported increasing the availability of naloxone and needle disposal bins in the community.

Actions selected by health topic

Table 4.1 Dental Health

Action

Yes

No

Put fluoride into the water in your community.

8.05%

91.95%

Increase support for dental health education and awareness.

59.77%

40.23%

Advocate for increased funding for dental health services and expansion of public dental programs.

63.22%

36.78%

Advocate for a provincially-funded dental health program for low income adults and seniors.

67.82%

32.18%

Table 4.2. Substance Misuse

Action

Yes

No

Advocate for sustained resources to address the rising rates of substance misuse.

73.56%

26.44%

Support local efforts to investigate the feasibility of safe injection sites.

27.59%

72.41%

Increase availability of naloxone and needle disposal bins in your community.

37.93%

62.07%

Advocate for increased timely access to treatment services and supportive housing for people struggling with addiction.

77.01%

22.99%

Table 4.3. Food Insecurity

Action

Yes

No

Implement, promote, and support the Living Wage program.

43.68%

56.32%

Support local programs, such as farmer’s markets, community gardens, and community kitchens.

83.91%

16.09%

Participate in the Windsor-Essex Food Policy Council to help shape a sustainable and healthy food system.

65.52%

34.38%

Implement a local food procurement policy for all municipally run facilities (e.g., recreation centres, day cares, etc.)

50.57%

49.43%

Table 4.4. Climate Change

Action

Yes

No

Advocate for ways to improve local air quality (e.g., anti-idling policies).

59.77%

40.23%

Provide support and resources to develop response plans for extreme weather events.

58.62%

41.38%

Prevent diseases such as Zika Virus, Lyme Disease, and West Nile Virus by allocating more funding and support for surveillance and education.

50.57%

49.43%

Advocate for increased education and support to protect our public beaches, preventing beach closures, as well as blue green algae.

65.52%

34.48%

Table 4.5. Mental Illness

Action

Yes

No

Advocate for funding for low- or no-cost mental health care, to increase local access to treatment.

88.51%

11.49%

Support training for first responders and front-line service providers to effectively help people living with mental illness.

87.36%

12.64%

Support local mental health awareness campaigns.

81.61%

18.39%

Table 4.6: Built Environment

Action

Yes

No

Advocate for investments in active transportation infrastructure (e.g., bike trails, walking paths, sidewalks) and public transit.

79.31%

20.69%

Support by-laws, policies, and planning that encourages healthy design characteristics (e.g., safe bike lanes, lighting, green space, parks, walkability).

71.26%

28.74%

Enhance neighborhood walkability by supporting higher residential density and mixed land use.

50.57%

49.43%

Advocate for increased natural and built shade structures.

58.62%

41.38%

Table 4.7: Health Inequity

Action

Yes

No

Ensure there is a wide range of safe and affordable housing options, including rental accommodations.

68.97%

31.03%

Expand opportunities for residents to gain safe and secure jobs with fair pay.

63.22%

36.78%

Increase access to affordable community and recreation programming.

64.37%

35.63%

Support the development and expansion of municipal social investment plans and poverty reduction strategies.

65.52%

34.48%

Table 5: Actions selected by percentage

Action

Selected

Advocate for funding of low- or no-cost mental health care, to increase local access to treatment.

88.51%

Support training for first responders and front-line service providers to effectively help people living with mental illness.

87.36%

Support local programs, such as farmer’s markets, community gardens, and community kitchens.

83.91%

Support local mental health awareness campaigns.

81.61%

Advocate for investments in active transportation infrastructure (e.g., bike trails, walking paths, sidewalks) and public transit.

79.31%

Advocate for increased timely access to treatment services and supportive housing for people struggling with addiction.

77.01%

Advocate for sustained resources to address the rising rates of substance misuse.

73.56%

Support by-laws, policies, and planning that encourages healthy design characteristics (e.g., safe bike lanes, lighting, green space, parks, walkability).

71.26%

Ensure there is a wide range of safe and affordable housing options, including rental accommodations.

68.97%

Advocate for a provincially-funded dental health program for low income adults and seniors.

67.82%

Participate in the Windsor-Essex Food Policy Council to help shape a sustainable and healthy food system.

65.52%

Advocate for increased education and support to protect our public beaches, preventing beach closures, as well as blue green algae.

65.52%

Support the development and expansion of municipal social investment plans and poverty reduction strategies.

65.52%

Increase access to affordable community and recreation programming.

64.37%

Advocate for increased funding for dental health services and expansion of public dental programs.

63.22%

Expand opportunities for residents to gain safe and secure jobs with fair pay.

63.22%

Increase support for dental health education and awareness.

59.77%

Advocate for ways to improve local air quality (e.g., anti-idling policies).

59.77%

Provide support and resources to develop response plans for extreme weather events.

58.62%

Advocate for increased natural and built shade structures.

58.62%

Implement a local food procurement policy for all municipally run facilities (e.g., recreation centres, day cares, etc.)

50.57%

Prevent diseases such as Zika Virus, Lyme Disease, and West Nile Virus by allocating more funding and support for surveillance and education.

50.57%

Enhance neighborhood walkability by supporting higher residential density and mixed land use.

50.57%

Implement, promote, and support the Living Wage program.

43.68%

Increase availability of naloxone and needle disposal bins in your community.

37.93%

Support local efforts to investigate the feasibility of safe injection sites.

27.59%

Put fluoride into the water in your community.

8.05%


View Document page

Board Members Present:

Joe Bachetti, Dr. Ken Blanchette, Mark Carrick, Dr. Deborah Kane, Judy Lund, Bill Marra, Gary McNamara, Dr. Carlin Miller, Hilary Payne, Gord Queen, John Scott, Michelle Watters​

Board Member Regrets:

Paul Borrelli, Richard Meloche, Ed Sleiman

Administration Present:

Theresa Marentette, Dr. Wajid Ahmed, Nicole Dupuis, Lorie Gregg, Kristy McBeth, Dan Sibley, Lee Anne Damphouse

WECHU Presenters: 

Eric Nadalin, Manager, CDIP

  1. Call to Order

    The meeting was called to order at 4:02 p.m.

  2. Agenda Approval

    It was moved

    That the agenda be approved

    CARRIED

  3. Announcement of Conflicts of Interest – None.
  4. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: September 20, 2018.

      It was moved

      That the minutes be approved.

      CARRIED

  5. Consent Agenda
    1. Information Reports

      The following information reports were presented to the Board.

      1. Budget – Recommendation Report (L. Gregg)

        L. Gregg presented the 2019 Budget to the Board for approval and the following information was provided. 

        T. Marentette commented on various community needs (identified in the 2016 Community Needs Assessment) namely substance misuse, oral health, TB increases, immunization rates in our area, Hep C (injection drug use in 50% of cases), changes in OPHS (notably Environmental Health), Cannabis pressures, Vision Screening requirements (with no funding attached), the Vector-Borne program (over 1,200 aedes albopictus mosquitos identified in our region with the potential to carry the Zika Virus) and climate change and extreme weather.

        Funding

        For 2018, WECHU put through our base funding request to the Ministry noting increased operational pressures.  We received a 3% increase.  With the recent change in government health units have been advised to expect a 0% increase.   Knowing this is not sustainable, we are proposing a 3.23% increase from the Ministry ($443,165) and 5% from the municipalities ($273,978).

        Vector-Borne Diseases

        Our funding over previous years for West Nile Virus was typically $128k, with the WECHU contracting out larviciding, trapping and enhanced surveillance.  This year trapping and surveillance for West Nile Virus, along with the enhanced program for aedes, was conducted by health unit staff with the assistance of public health inspection students.  Out of 11 traps aedes albopictus was found in 7 them. 

        This year we have 12 confirmed cases of West Nile Virus, 7 cases of Lyme Disease, and are the only region with confirmed aedes albopictus. With increased funding, we can do more education, awareness and campaigns to the public, and precisely track data to make decisions on larviciding and next steps.  We require more dedicated resources for this program, and the ask this year to increase program expenses to $350k is significant.

        Base and One time funding

        We can submit up to 10 one-time funding business case requests to the Ministry.  Through prioritization, we identified an overall need for 7 additional staff including Public Health Inspectors, Health Promotion Specialists, RPN’s, Tobacco Enforcement Officer, with associated operational costs of $48k for computers and equipment.  

        Healthy Babies Healthy Children and Nurse Practitioner Program

        Program initiative expenditures of $2,755,841 supports 27 individuals for their work within the community.  For 2019, we anticipate $146k for the Nurse Practitioner program expenditures, with 100% funding of $139k allocated for this position.  We will continue to advocate for increased funding to the Ministry of Children and Youth Services to cover the entirety of this position.

        Risks

        With the substantial changes to the Standards, in particular to Environmental Health, the addition of Vision Screening, and operational pressures on our Tobacco Enforcement Officers with the legalization of cannabis, we will need to have further discussions with the Board of Health and municipalities if we receive a 0% increase in funding as noted by the Ministry.  There are also 2 ongoing labour negotiations that have not yet been settled.

        It was moved

        That the Board move into Committee of the Whole at 4:39 p.m.

        CARRIED

        It was moved

        That the Board move out of Committee of the Whole at 4:50 p.m.

        CARRIED

        After brief discussion Board Chair, G. McNamara, read the Resolution Recommendation to the Board of Health. 

        It was moved

        That the Board of Health approve the Resolution Recommendation

        IN FAVOUR - 11

        OPPOSED - 1

        CARRIED

      2. Cannabis – Recommendation Report

        In light of legislation, and since we have not received enough information on what the impact could be, N. Dupuis noted that WECHU’s recommendations is to encourage municipalities to choose the “Opt-out” opportunity.  WECHU has not yet been advised of what dedicated support will be received.

        B. Marra advised that there have been preliminary conversations at Windsor city council to strongly opt-out and err on the side of caution until more information becomes available.  Chair G. McNamara noted that the Town of Tecumseh is arranging a public meeting for their residents with the information that they have so far.

        It was moved

        That the Recommendation be received

        CARRIED

      3. Vote for Health Survey Results
      4. Community Partners List 2018
      5. September Media Relations Recap

        It was moved

        That the information reports be received.

        CARRIED

  6. Business Arising
    1. Capital Project Update

      T. Marentette provided a brief update on the capital project.  Once Colliers Project Leaders completes the RFI, WECHU will go out with a request for suitable space to meet its needs through a developer or a landlord.

  7. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  8. New Business
    1. Staff Appreciation

      D. Sibley advised the Board that the WECHU will be holding their annual Staff Appreciation Day on Friday, November 30 at the Ciociaro Club from 8:30 am – 12:00 pm.  Breakfast will be provided at 9:00 am. The event will recognize staff accomplishments and service awards will be presented. Our guest speaker is Board of Health member John Scott and all Board members are invited and welcome to attend.

  9. Board Correspondence/Other Health Unit Letters/Resolutions
    1. Smoke-Free Ontario Act – For Support
      1. alPHa – Letter to Laura Pisko
      2. Peterborough Public Health – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott
    2. Ontario’s Basic Income Pilot – For Support/Information
      1. Windsor-Essex County Health Unit – For Information
      2. Southwestern Public Health – For Support – Letter to Hon. Lisa McLeod
    3. Why Ontario Needs a Chronic Disease Prevention Strategy – For Support
      1. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott
    4. Drug Policy – For Support
      1. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health – Letter to Right Hon. Justin Trudeau
    5. Repeal of Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada – for Support
      1. Southwest Public Health – Letter to Jody Wilson—Raybould
    6. Dedicated Funding for Local Public Health Agencies – Cannabis Sales – For Support
      1. Middlesex-London Health Unit – Letter to Premier Doug Ford
    7. Displays and Promotion of Vaping Products in Convenience Stores and Gas Bars – For Support
      1. Ontario Campaign for Action on Tobacco (OCAT) – Media Release

        It was moved

        That the above correspondence be Supported and Received

  10. Committee of the Whole (CLOSED SESSION, in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)

    It was moved

    That the Board move into Committee of the Whole at 4:39 p.m.

    CARRIED

    It was moved

    That the Board move out of Committee of the Whole at 4:50 p.m.

    CARRIED

  11. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or November 15, 2018 in Windsor, Ontario
  12. Adjournment

    The meeting adjourned at 5:21 pm.

RECORDING SECRETARY:

SUBMITTED BY:

APPROVED BY:


View Document page
  DIVISIONS
PARTNERS Health
Protection
Health
Promotion
Knowledge
Management
Corporate
Services
AIDS Committee of Windsor X X    
Association of Public Health Epidemiologists in Ontario     X  
Bulimia Anorexia Nervosa Association   X    
Canadian Food Inspection Agency X      
Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) Windsor-Essex  X X    
Cancer Care Ontario X   X  
Central West Communicators Network Group     X  
Child Care Operators (Licenced) X X    
Children First   X    
Children's Safety Village Windsor   X    
Council on Aging Windsor-Essex County   X    
Detroit Health Department X      
Downtown Mission   X    
Environment and Climate Change Canada X      
Erie St. Clair Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) X X X X
Essex County Dental Society   X    
Essex County Federation of Agriculture (ECFA)   X    
Essex Region Conservation Authority (ERCA) X X    
Essex-Windsor EMS X X X  
F.A.R.M.S. X      
Family Health Teams (Windsor-Essex County) X X    
Family Services Windsor-Essex   X    
Fire Departments and Designated Officers (Local) X X    
First Nations - local (e.g. Caldwell First Nation) X X    
Great Lakes Water Institute X      
Health Canada X X    
Health Quality Ontario X      
Healthy Kids Community Challenge    X    
Hiatus House   X    
Homeless Coalition of Windsor-Essex County   X    
Hospitals (Windsor-Essex) X X   X
IDEAS  (Improving & Driving Excellence Across Sectors) Foundations of Q.I. Program      X  
John McGivney Centre   X    
Long-Term Care Facilities/Rest Homes (Windsor-Essex County) X      
Maryvale   X    
Medical Professionals (e.g. Dietitians, Dentists, Midwives, Obstetricians, Nurse Practitioners, Pediatrians, Pharmacists, Physicians,  Veternarians) X X    
Ministry of Education   X    
Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks X   X  
Ministry of Finance   X    
Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care     X X
Ministry of Transportation   X    
Municipalities - Bylaw Enforcement X X    
Municipalities - Community Control Group (Emergency Management) X      
Municipalities (Windsor-Essex,  County of Essex)  X X X X
Newcomer Settlement Agencies - Interpreters and Settlement Workers (e.g. Canadian Multicultural Council, Multicultural Council of Windsor and Essex County, New Canadians' Centre of Excellence, South Essex Community Council) X X X  
Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics   X    
Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health       X
Ontario Association of Communicators in Public Health     X  
Ontario Indigenous Cultural Safety Program Leaders     X  
Ontario Living Wage Network/Committee   X X  
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) X      
Ontario Student Nutrition Program   X    
Police Services (including RCMP and OPP) X X    
Preschool and Family Literacy Centres (5 locations)   X    
Public Health Agency of Canada X   X X
Public Health Ontario X   X X
Raising the Bar: W-E County Committee   X    
Regional Communications Network - Local     X  
Sandwich Community Health Centre X      
School Boards - Local (Agency, Faith-Based, Public, Private) X X    
School Boards - Ontario (e.g. Lambton-Kent District School Board, Rainy River)   X    
Schools - Post Secondary (e,g. St. Clair College, University of Windsor, University of Guelph,
University of Waterloo, Queens University, Brock)
X X    
Seniors Active Living Centres/Clubs (e.g. Life After Fifty)   X    
Service Canada X      
Smoker's Helpline   X    
Southwest Active Recreation Guild (SWARG)   X    
St. Leonard's House    X    
Statistics Canada     X  
Talk 2 Me   X    
Teen Health X      
Treatment Centres - Local (e.g. House of Sophrosyne, Brentwood)   X    
United Way/Centraide Windsor-Essex County   X X  
VON Erie St. Clair Immigrant Health Clinic X X    
Walkerton Clean Water Centre (WCWC) X      
Water Treatment Plants  X      
Welcome Centre Shelter for Women and Families X      
Windsor-Essex Children and Youth Planning Committee   X    
Windsor-Essex Children's Aid Society   X    
Windsor-Essex Communities In Motion (WE-CIM)   X    
Windsor-Essex Local Immigration Partnership (LIP)   X    
Windsor-Essex Regional Chamber of Commerce   X X  
Windsor-Esssex County Children's Aid Society     X  
Working Toward Wellness Committee   X    

View Document page

Proposed Motion

Whereas, the federal government has passed the Cannabis Act, 2017 to legalize non-medical cannabis, coming into effect on October 17th, 2018, and

Whereas, the Ontario government has amended the provincial Cannabis Act, 2017 to permit a privatized retail model in Ontario, and

Whereas, cannabis smoke contains many of the same carcinogens, toxins, and irritants found in tobacco smoke with the added psychoactive properties of cannabinoids like THC, and

Whereas, increased density and clustering of cannabis retailers may result in increased access, consumption, and increased risk for chronic disease, mental illness, and injury, and

Whereas, Ontario municipalities will have the one-time opportunity to OPT OUT of cannabis retail outlets in their communities, and

Now therefore be it resolved that, the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health encourages all Windsor-Essex municipalities to OPT OUT of the cannabis retail model as proposed by the provincial government in their respective communities.

FURTHER that the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health encourages the provincial government to establish limits on the number of retailers in a geographic area to prevent clustering and reduce retail outlet density.

FURTHER that, the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health for the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit encourages provincial government to set additional regulations with respect to the proximity of retail outlets in relation to areas which may unfairly target vulnerable populations.

FURTHER that, the provincial government provide local public health units with dedicated funding for public education and health promotion activities as well as the enforcement of cannabis-related regulations under the Smoke-free Ontario Act and FURTHER that the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health for the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit encourages all Windsor-Essex municipalities to amend existing smoke-free by-laws to include “cannabis” in the definition, and expand spaces where the use of substances is prohibited (e.g., cannabis consumption venues or vape lounges).

FURTHER that, previous Resolutions passed by the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health are shared with the newly elected provincial government.

FURTHER that the Windsor-Essex Board of health suggests the province providing for the ability of municipalities to create licensing and zoning regulations, which would be reflective of the unique needs of individual communities in addition to increasing the number and distance of buffer zones proposed for retail outlets from vulnerable areas.

AND FURTHER that this resolution be shared with the Honorable Prime Minister of Canada, local Members of Parliament, the Premier of Ontario, local Members of Provincial Parliament, Minister of Health and Long-term Care, Federal Minister of Health, the Attorney General, Chief Medical Officer of Health, Association of Local Public Health Agencies, Ontario Boards of Health, Ontario Public Health Association, the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, and local community partners.

Appendix

Municipal engagement activities to date

Summary of Activities

Date

Municipality

Activity

November, 2017

Windsor

Presented to city administrators A Public Health Perspective for the Location of Cannabis Retail Storefronts in the City of Windsor: Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Recommendations recommends a minimum distance of 500m to be set between cannabis businesses or production facilities and sensitive areas such as schools, low-income areas, and mental health and addiction treatment facilities.

May 28, 2018

Leamington

Provided a letter in support of the recommended regulations set out in Council Report LLS-28-18, regarding the regulation of cannabis production and distribution. In addition to supporting the restrictions outlined in the report for the regulation of cannabis production and distribution within the municipality, WECHU provided additional insight into the health implications associated with cannabis exposure and additional measures which should be considered in protecting residents from second-hand cannabis smoke and smoking behaviour, including recommendations for the siting of cannabis-related businesses.

June 20, 2018

Windsor

Participated in meeting with representatives from the City of Windsor administration, Ontario Cannabis Store Vice President and Community Engagement Team, and Windsor Police to discuss proposed cannabis retail locations, operations, and safety of operational measures and provide feedback from a public health perspective.

 

Amherstburg

Contributed feedback and recommendations for the Amherstburg Parks Master Plan to establish minimum distance requirements between existing alcohol and cannabis outlets and between all new alcohol/cannabis outlets to playground, youth facilities and recreation areas.

June, 2018

Kingsville

Contributed feedback and recommendations for the Town of Kingsville Official Plan Review: Issues and Policy Directions Report to set minimum distances between cannabis-related businesses and sensitive land use areas.

July 18, 2018

LaSalle

Participated in meeting to discuss legalization implications and needs for the municipality, and present recommendations for zoning of cannabis related businesses and ways to strengthen existing by-laws (e.g. municipal smoking by-laws).

August, 2018

Kingsville

Contributed feedback and recommendations for the Town of Kingsville Application for Zoning By Law Amendment (4.46 Medical Marihuana Production Facilities). Recommendations included establishing minimum distance requirement be increased to no less than 500m between marihuana production facilities and lands zoned for residential, recreational, institutional use and Lake Erie. It was also recommended that facilities should operate with an odour abatement protocol to eliminate noxious odour and conduct environmental impact assessments and provide reports to the municipality.

August 29, 2018

Tecumseh

Attended meeting to provide recommendations for zoning and siting of retail locations and recommend ways to strengthen existing by-laws (e.g. municipal smoking by-laws).

September 28, 2018

All municipalities

Presented recommendations for licensing, zoning, and by-law amendments from a public health perspective to all municipal CAOs. Provided recommendations on how to best approach the private retail model implementation in Windsor-Essex and the importance of a unified approach across municipalities.


View Document page

Proposed Motion

The WECHU Leadership Team recommends:

That the 2019 Cost Share Budget, as presented, requiring a 3.23 percent increase in funding from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and a 5 percent increase in funding from the Obligated Municipalities, the Corporation of the City of Windsor, the Corporation of the County of Essex and the Corporation of the Township of Pelee, be approved.

That total Cost Shared expenditures net of offset revenue for 2019, in the amount of $19,902,586, be approved.

That total expenditures for 2019 relating to the Vector-Borne Disease program, in the amount of $350,000, be approved.

That total Healthy Babies Healthy Children Program Initiative expenditures, in the amount of $2,755,841, be approved.

That total Nurse Practitioner Program Initiative expenditures, in the amount of $146,617, be approved.

That total Related Program expenditures, in the amount of $3,469,870, be approved.


View Document page

September 20, 2018

  1. Call to Order
  2. Agenda Approval
  3. Announcement of Conflict of Interest
  4. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: June 21, 2018
  5. Committee of the Whole (Closed Session in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
  6. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS:
      1. Q2 Reporting (L. Gregg)
      2. Q2 Financial Results (L. Gregg)
      3. Q2 Strategic Plan Report (K. McBeth)
      4. Q2 Planning Report (K. McBeth)
      5. Supervised Injection Services (T. Marentette)
      6. Vote for Health Municipal Election Survey (T. Marentette)
      7. Media Recap (June – August 2018)
      8. CEO Quarterly Compliance (April – June 2018)
  7. Business Arising
  8. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  9. New Business
    1. 2017 Annual Report (K. McBeth)
    2. 2018 BOH Competency Based Self-Evaluation (K. McBeth)
  10. Board Correspondence/Other Health Unit Letters/Resolutions
    1. Mandatory Food Literacy Curricula in Schools – For Support
      1. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Health Unit – Letter to Minister Responsible for Early Years and Child Care, Hon. Indira Naidoo-Harris
      2. Peterborough Public Health – Letter to Deputy Premier, Hon. Christine Elliott
    2. The Toronto Board of Health – Student Nutrition Program –     For Support – Memo to Board of Health in Ontario
    3. The Toronto Board of Health – Toronto Overdose Action Plan – For Support – Reinforce with provincial and federal governments the urgency of the opioid poisoning emergency, and the critical need to scale up actions in response
    4. Association of Local Public Health Agencies – Supervised Consumption Facilities – For Support
    5. Ontario Physical and Health Education Association (OPHEA) – Ministry of Education – Sexual Health Education Component curriculum reverting back to the 1998 version – For Support – Requesting that WECHU align our position with school boards in the Windsor-Essex region leading into the 2018/2019 school year
    6. Smoke-Free Ontario Act, 2017 – Delay in Implementation – For information Only
      1. Sudbury & District Public Health – Letter to Premier Ford
      2. Timiskaming Health Unit – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott, Minister of Health and Long Term Care
      3. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Health Unit – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott, Minister of Health and Long Term Care
      4. Windsor-Essex County Health Unit – Letter to Premier Ford
      5. Municipality of Chatham-Kent Public Health Unit – Letter to Premier Ford
      6. Grey Bruce Health Unit – Letter to Premier Doug Ford
  11. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or October 18, 2018 – Essex
  12. Adjournment

View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

July 4, 2018

Subject:

June Media Relations Recap Report

June Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

46

Interview Requests

17

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

29

June 2018 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

Story Source

June 2018 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Outlet

Number of Stories

AM 800

8
Blackburn 6
Canada.com 1
CBC 4
Chatham This Week 1
CTV 5
Essex Free Press 1
Wallaceburg Courier Press 1
Watertoday.ca 1
Windsor Star 13
Windsorite.ca 3
TOTAL 44

News Release and Media Advisories

Date Type Headline Response

June 5, 2018

News Release

Mosquito Trap Reveals 2 Aedes albopictus Species in the Area

5 Stories Reported

June 12, 2018

News Release

Beach Water Test Results Available June 13

15 Stories Reported

June 15, 2018

Heat Warning

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Issued Extended Heat Warning

1 Story Reported

June 18, 2018

Media Advisory

Health Unit First In Windsor-Essex To Receive Baby-Friendly Initiative Designation

3 Stories Reported

June 20, 2018

Media Advisory

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Meeting at Essex Office

1 Story Reported

June 26, 2018

News Release

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Strives to Help Women Achieve Breastfeeding Goals

1 Story Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

June 5, 2018

Mosquitoes In Windsor-Essex Test Negative For Zika Virus

June 7, 2018

Oral Health Presentation Bring Fluoride Debate To Essex County Council

June 13, 2018

No Swimming At One Local Beach

June 20, 2018

Local Health Unit Recognized For Its Support For Breastfeeding

June 21, 2018

Health Unit Prepares For Changes To The Smoke-Free Ontario Act

June 21, 2018

Swimming Not Recommended At Four Area Beaches

June 26, 2018

Lynne Martin Show – Breastfeeding Reports Are Dismal

June 28, 2018

One Local Beach Not Recommended For Swimming

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

June 5, 2018

Mosquitoes Found In Windsor-Essex Not Carrying Zika Or West Nile

June 6, 2018

Several Sides Sink Their Teeth Into Vigorous Debate Over Fluoride

June 8, 2018

Mental Health Problems Too Prevalent In Windsor-Essex

June 13, 2018

Most Windsor-Essex Beaches Clear For Swimming

June 20, 2018

Four Local Beaches Have High Levels Of Bacteria

June 28, 2018

All Windsor-Essex Beaches Are Open For Swimming

Canada.com

Publish Date

Title

June 20, 2018

Health Unit Strives To Improve Dismal Local Breastfeeding Rate

CBC News

Publish Date

Title

June 5, 2018

Mosquito Trap In Windsor-Essex Captures Known Carriers Of Zika And West Nile Viruses

June 13, 2018

Eight Out Of Nine Beaches Tested In Windsor-Essex Cleared For Swimming

June 13, 2018

Health Unit Warns Businesses To Prepare For Legalized Pot Implications In The Workplace

July 2, 2018

New Rules Outlaw Cannabis Lounges, Windsor Owner Refuses To Shut Down

Chatham This Week

Publish Date

Title

June 20, 2018

Water Sampling Now Bare Minimum (Chatham This Week)

CTV News

Publish Date

Title

June 5, 2018

Two Mosquitos Known To Transmit Zika Found In Windsor-Essex Trap

June 13, 2018

Only One Windsor-Essex Beach Not Recommended For Swimming

June 15, 2018

Extended Heat Warning Issued For Windsor-Essex

June 15, 2018

https://windsor.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=1420685

June 27, 2018

Most Windsor-Essex Beaches Deemed Safe For Swimming This Weekend

Essex Free Press

Publish Date Title

June 14, 2018

WECHU Oral Health Report Recommends Fluoridation Of Drinking Water (Pgs 8-9)

Wallaceburg Courier Press

Publish Date Title

June 20, 2018

Water Sampling Now Bare Minimum (Wallaceburg Courier Press)

Windsor Star

Publish Date Title

June 6, 2018

Daytime Biting Mosquitoes That Could Carry Zika Found In Windsor For Third Year

June 6, 2018

Looming Vaping Regulations Will Drive People To Smoke Cigarettes, Vaping Advocates

June 7, 2018

Health Unit Calls On Windsor, Essex County Municipalities To Add Fluoride To Water

June 13, 2018

Beach Monitoring Season Starts With Single Warning For High Bacteria

June 13, 2018

Reader Letter: Fluoridation Of Drinking Water Obsolete And Detrimental

June 14, 2018

Beware Of Ticks — Local Number Of Lyme Disease Cases Continues To Grow

June 14, 2018

Employers Seek Guidance For Workplace Rules For Marijuana

June 15, 2018

Lasalle Pharmacist Named Ontario's 2018 Pharmacist Of The Year

June 20, 2018

Health Unit Strives To Improve Dismal Local Breastfeeding Rate

June 22, 2018

Keep Taking Precautions Against Deer Ticks, Says Health Unit

June 28, 2018

Swimming Not Recommended At Belle River Beach

June 29, 2018

Heat Warnings Issued For Blistering Long Weekend

Windsorite.ca

Publish Date Title

June 13, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended At One Beach

June 20, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended At Four Beaches

June 27, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended At One Local Beach

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy and Michael Janisse


View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

August 1, 2018

Subject:

July Media Relations Recap Report

July Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

45

Interview Requests

8

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

37

July 2018 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

Story Source

July 2018 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Outlet

Number of Stories

AM 800

8

Blackburn

5

CBC

10

CTV

8

The Square

1

Windsor Star

7

Windsorite.ca

5

Yahoo News

1

TOTAL

45

News Release and Media Advisories

Date Type Headline Response

July 6, 2018

Heat Warning

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Ends Extended Heat Warning

3 Stories Reported

July 11, 2018

News Release

First West Nile Virus Positive Mosquito Pool Found

7 Stories Reported

July 12, 2018

Heat Warning

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Issues Extended Heat Warning

0 Stories Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

July 4, 2018

Essex Council Say No To Fluoride

July 4, 2018

Three Lake Erie Beaches Not Recommended For Swimming

July 6, 2018

Relief! Heat Warning Lifted For Windsor-Essex

July 11, 2018

Three Local Beaches Not Recommended For Swimming

July 11, 2018

Signs Of West Nile In Windsor-Essex

July 18, 2018

Sandpoint Beach Closed Because Of High Bacteria Counts

July 25, 2018

Two Area Beaches Closed

July 31, 2018

One Local Beach Not Recommended For Swimming

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

July 4, 2018

Three Local Beaches Not Recommended For Swimming

July 11, 2018

Three Local Beach Warnings This Week

July 11, 2018

West Nile Virus Found In Windsor-Essex

July 18, 2018

Two Thirds Of Local Beaches Are Not Safe For Swimming This Week

July 25, 2018

Two Beaches Closed This Week

CBC News

Publish Date

Title

July 3, 2018

Windsor-Essex Remains Under Heat Warning Until Thursday

July 4, 2018

Essex Town Council Says 'No' To Fluoride In Drinking Water

July 10, 2018

'There's No Relief,' Street Help Says Heat Makes Life Even Harder For Homeless

July 11, 2018

3 Essex County Beaches Unsage For Swimming, Health Unit Warns

July 11, 2018

Mosquito Pool Test Positive For West Nile Virus In Windsor-Essex

July 19, 2018

First Beach Closure This Year In Windsor At Sandpoint Beach Due To E. Coli

July 25, 2018

Windsor Closes Second Beach In As Many Weeks After High E. Coli Levels In Colchester

July 30, 2018

Beach Closures Mean Unsafe Sand Too, Says Water Quality Specialist

CTV News

Publish Date

Title

July 4, 2018

Essex Council Says Resounding ‘No’ To Fluoridated Water

July 5, 2018

Three Of Nine Local Beaches Post High Bacteria Counts

July 6, 2018

Extended Heat Warning Ends In Windsor-Essex, Chatham-Kent

July 11, 2018

High Bacteria Counts At Three Windsor-Essex Beaches Prompt Warning From Health Unit

July 11, 2018

First Sign Of West Nile Virus This Season Found In Windsor

July 18, 2018

Sandpoint Beach Closed Due To High Bacteria Counts

July 25, 2018

Two Windsor-Essex Beaches Closed To Swimmers

The Square

Publish Date Title

July 12, 2018

West Nile Mosquito Pool Found

Windsor Star

Publish Date Title

July 2, 2018

Highway 3 Reopened After Extreme Heat Buckled Road

July 3, 2018

Province Pauses New Rules Outlawing Cannabis Lounges For Medical Users

July 5, 2018

Essex Councillors Vote Against Fluoridating Drinking Water

July 12, 2018

First Positive West Nile Mosquito Pool Found

July 12, 2018

Health Unit Warns Three Local Beaches Unsafe For Swimming

July 18, 2018

'Danger!' — Pollution Spike Leads To Sand Point Beach Shutdown

July 19, 2018

Nursing Student's App Aimed At Saving Opioid Overdose Victims

Windsorite.ca

Publish Date Title

July 4, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended At Three Local Beaches

July 11, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended At Three Local Beaches

July 11, 2018

First West Nile Virus Positive Mosquito Pool Found

July 18, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: One Beach Closed, Swimming Not Recommended At Five Others

July 25, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Two Beaches Closed, Swimming Not Recommended At One Other

Yahoo News

Publish Date Title

July 30, 2018

Beach Closures Mean Unsafe Sand Too, Says Water Quality Specialist (shared article from CBC)

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy and Michael Janisse


View Document page