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November 15, 2018

Board Members Present:

Joe Bachetti, Dr. Ken Blanchette, Dr. Deborah Kane, Judy Lund, Bill Marra, Gary McNamara, Gord Queen, John Scott, Ed Sleiman

Board Member Regrets:

Paul Borrelli, Mark Carrick, Richard Meloche, Dr. Carlin Miller, Hilary Payne, Michelle Watters

Administration Present:

Theresa Marentette, Dr. Wajid Ahmed, Lorie Gregg, Dan Sibley, Lee Anne Damphouse

Administration Regrets: 

Nicole Dupuis, Kristy McBeth

Introduction:  T. Marentette introduced and welcomed the newest WECHU Manager, Felicia Lawal, Manager of Health Families Department.

T. Marentette also advised Board of Health members that there are KI Pills (Potassium Iodide) available at the meeting and if anyone wishes to obtain to please register accordingly.

  1. Call to Order
    The meeting was called to order at 4:05 p.m.
  2. Agenda Approval
    It was moved
    That the agenda be approved - CARRIED
  3. Announcement of Conflicts of Interest – None.
  4. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: October 18, 2018
      It was moved
      That the minutes be approved - CARRIED
  5. Presentation – Topical Issues: Dr. Wajid Ahmed
    Opioid Related Morbidity and Mortality in Windsor-Essex County
    Dr. Wajid Ahmed provided information to the Board on problematic drug use in our communities, noting the sudden spike in the use of various drugs.  How did this happen?  The sudden increase stems from several factors, one being psychological, social and biological risk factors like genetics, mental health, early life experiences, trauma, poverty, lack of secure housing and other determinants of health.  Another factor is the misunderstanding of the addictive risk of prescribed opioids.  Previously, in the 1990’s, pharmaceutical companies designed opioids that reduced pain and symptoms, though lack of awareness of alternative treatments for pain led to, in some cases, over-prescribing, as well as unintended consequences such as addiction.

    The lack of access to prescribed opioids has led to theft of prescription opioids by friends and family members and illicit opioid use.  Illegal drugs are frequently laced with other substances like fentanyl leading to serious, and sometimes fatal, consequences.

    Addiction vs Dependence
    Addiction
    A chronic, relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use despite harmful consequences, as well as the drug providing desired euphoric effects

    Dependence
    A condition that can occur with regular use of drugs even if prescribed and used as prescribed. Characterized by withdrawal symptoms when stopped – a person can be dependent without being addicted but dependence sometimes leads to addiction

    Public health’s role in this complex problem is leveraging our partnerships. By collaborating and coordinating with other various organizations we can all be part of the solution through harm reduction activities, i.e. clean needle distribution, naloxone distribution, SIS/Consumption sites, and the advocacy piece for more funding and more resources for our communities.  Data collection from various agencies pulled together help to paint a better picture of what is happening in our region. Short term steps are sharing data with relevant agencies and advocating for funding for treatment and rehabilitation/harm reduction services.

    What is happening here is a significant problem and it is happening across the country.  In 2016, WECHU formed the Windsor Essex Community Opioid Strategy Leadership Committee (WECOS-LC) to develop community wide response focusing on opioid related morbidity and mortality, and to ensure implementation across multiple sectors and address the following four pillars of the WECOS:
    1) Prevention/Education
    2) Harm Reduction
    3) Treatment
    4) Enforcement

    This leadership is tasked with ensuring the feasibility of suggested interventions as well as assisting in the implementation of effective, local and sustainable solutions for opioid use and overdose prevention.  Effort was made to include people with lived experience to ensure they have direct input into the high-level planning of the strategy.

    T. Marentette is currently conducting Key Stakeholder Interviews as part of the Supervised Injection Services Community Consultation study.  The purpose of this study is to:
    • Look at how the community in Windsor view supervised injection services and identify any concerns
    • Explore potential clients’ willingness to use supervised injection services
    • Identify how the services should be delivered to meet the needs of people who inject drugs

    This study will help with decisions about supervised injection services and identify any questions or concerns.

    Various discussion continued on Naloxone distribution.  EMS are equipped with Naloxone but Fire and Police Services do not. In order to save lives First Responders need to be equipped with Naloxone and we need to be able to provide services where people can safely inject drugs – Windsor is not one of those sites that have been approved.

    Rapid Action Addition Medicine Clinics (RAAM) are medical clinics for individuals who are looking for help in regards to their substance use. The doctors at these clinics have experience treating individuals struggling with alcohol or opioid use. Doctors assess each individual and develop a treatment plan accordingly, and referrals to community organizations for further support can be arranged.  These clinics have been implemented in many communities, but not in Windsor.  We need to increase our budget to cover costs within our communities, and when we do request more funding/resources we need to have a game plan and accurate data.  The Board of Health will be kept informed of any progress and if further funding from the Ministry is not forthcoming, we may need to speak with our local funders.

    In closing Dr. Ahmed noted that the Windsor-Essex region needs more treatment and rehabilitation services so people who need them can be guided to treatment.

  6. Consent Agenda:
    1. Information Reports
      The following information reports were presented to the Board.
      1. Q3 Strategic Plan Report/Q3 Strategic Plan Progress Report
      2. Q3 Planning Report
      3. BOH Education Sessions – Summer 2019
      4. Risk Management

      It was moved
      That the information reports be received. - CARRIED

  7. Business Arising – None
  8. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  9. New Business – None
  10. Board Correspondence/Other Health Unit Letters/Resolutions
    1. alPha – Update to BOH Members – For Information – October 26, 2018 – various links and items of interest
    2. Opioid Crisis – National Drug Strategy – For Support - Southwestern Public Health – Oxford, Elgin, St. Thomas – Letter to Hon. Premier Doug Ford
      It was moved
      That the above correspondence be Supported and Received - CARRIED
  11. Committee of the Whole (CLOSED SESSION, in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
    It was moved
    That the Board move into Committee of the Whole at 4:57 p.m. - CARRIED
    It was moved
    That the Board move out of Committee of the Whole at 5:15 p.m. - CARRIED
  12. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or December 20, 2018 in Windsor, Ontario
  13. Adjournment
    The meeting adjourned at 5:20 pm.

RECORDING SECRETARY:

SUBMITTED BY:

APPROVED BY:


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October 18, 2018

Flu Vaccines will be available for Board of Health members from 3:30 pm – 4:00 pm

  1. Call to Order
  2. Agenda Approval
  3. Announcement of Conflict of Interest
  4. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting:  September 20, 2018
  5. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS:
      1. Budget – Recommendation Report  (L. Gregg)
        • Resolution Recommendation
      1. Cannabis – Recommendation Report (N. Dupuis)
        • Resolution Recommendation
      1. Vote for Health Survey Results (T. Marentette)
      2. Community Partners List 2018 (T. Marentette)
      3. September Media Relations Recap (K. McBeth)
  6. Business Arising
    1. PGC Capital Project Update (T. Marentette)
  7. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  8. New Business
    1. Staff Appreciation (D. Sibley)
  9. Other Board of Health Resolutions/Letters – For Support/Information
    1. Smoke-Free Ontario Act – For Support
      1. alPHa – Letter to Laura Pisko, MOHLTC
      2. Peterborough Public Health – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott
    2. Ontario’s Basic Income Pilot – For Support/Information
      1. Windsor-Essex County Health Unit – For Information – Letter to Hon. Lisa McLeod
      2. Southwestern Public Health – For Support – Letter to Hon. Lisa McLeod
    3. Why Ontario Needs a Chronic Disease Prevention Strategy – For Support
      1. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott
    4. Drug Policy – For Support
      1. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health – Letter to Right Hon. Justin Trudeau
    5. Repeal of Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada – For Support
      1. Southwestern Public Health – Letter to Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould
    6. Dedicated Funding for Local Public Health Agencies – Cannabis Sales – For Support
      1. Middlesex-London Health Unit – Letter to Premier Doug Ford
    7. Displays and Promotion of Vaping Products in Convenience Stores and Gas Bars – For Information
      1. Ontario Campaign for Action on Tobacco (OCAT) – Media Release
  10. Committee of the Whole (Closed Session in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act) 77
  11. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or November 15, 2018 –  Windsor
  12. Adjournment

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Prepared By:

Melissa Valentik, Health Promotion Specialist

Eric Nadalin, Manager, Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention

Date:

October 5, 2018

Subject:

Non-Medical Cannabis Legalization

Background

Cannabis is currently the most commonly used illegal substance in Canada (CCSA, 2017). Approximately 15.7% of Ontario residents self-reported cannabis use within 12 months (CAMH, 2016).  In Windsor and Essex County, approximately 28, 900 residents used cannabis in the last year. Among those who consume cannabis, rates are highest among youth and young adults (WECHU, 2016). With legalization of cannabis, effective October 17, it is anticipated that the number of residents that report using cannabis will rise given the social acceptability of cannabis use.

Although cannabis smoke contains similar toxins to those found in tobacco smoke including those that are associated with cancer, as well as heart and respiratory disease, the harms of cannabis consumption extend beyond those directly associated with long-term chronic disease. Increased rates of injury or harms associated with impaired driving, falls or general impairment, damage to cognitive functioning (i.e., memory, focus, ability to think and learn), depression, anxiety, psychosis, and addiction are all associated with cannabis use. These harms increase when cannabis use begins prior to the age of 25, as well as with frequent or heavy use (CCSA, 2016, Parachute Vision Zero Network, 2018). Lastly, maternal cannabis use is linked to low birth weight, pregnancy complications, and may affect children’s cognitive functioning, behaviour, mental health and future substance use (Best Start, 2017).

The process leading toward legalization began In December 2015, when the Government of Canada announced its commitment to legalize, regulate, and restrict access to non-medical cannabis in Canada, with the intent to keep cannabis out of the hands of children and the profits out of the hands of criminals. In response, the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health passed a resolution on January 14, 2016 supporting a public health approach to cannabis legalization, including strong health-centered and age-restricted regulations to reduce the health and social harms associated with cannabis use. In addition, the resolution mandated the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit support the development of healthy public policies and enforcement of future regulations to ensure minimal negative effects on public health and safety. The federal government introduced Bill C-45, the Cannabis Act, in April of 2017. This legislation would legalize access to non-medical (i.e., recreational) cannabis in Canada and provide a foundation of regulations on which provincial/territorial governments could develop more specific controls for how cannabis is grown, distributed, and sold in their provinces and territories. The federal Cannabis Act contains the following baseline regulations:

  • restricts youth access to cannabis by prohibiting sale or supply to anyone under the age of 18;
  • applies a personal possession limit of no more than 30g;
  • limits personal cultivation to a maximum of four plants per household;
  • prohibits packaging or labelling which makes cannabis products appealing to youth;
  • requires standardized serving sizes and potency, and
  • allows for only certain cannabis products to be offered for sale (i.e., dried cannabis, oils, and seeds), with others to be permitted at a later date (i.e., edibles).

In anticipation of further provincial regulation, the Windsor-Essex Board of Health passed a second resolution which aimed to better position municipalities to prepare in the context of federal and provincial regulation. This resolution, passed in October 2017, provided Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (WECHU) the mandate to prepare and protect our community from potential harms of cannabis legalization by:

  1. Encouraging Windsor-Essex municipalities to develop strict licensing, planning, and zoning regulations,
  2. Working with enforcement agencies and municipalities to support smoking prohibitions, and
  3. Promoting Canada’s Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines to reduce harms of cannabis use.

Building on the foundation of regulations provided by the federal government, the Province of Ontario passed the provincial Cannabis Act on December 12, 2017 to further refine the legal sale and use of cannabis in Ontario by applying the following broad set of controls:

  • restricts sale, purchase, possession, and sharing of cannabis to age 19 or older (consistent with the minimum age for obtaining alcohol); and
  • allows for the purchase and possession of up to 30 grams (about one ounce) of dried cannabis at one time;
  • permits the smoking and vaping of cannabis anywhere the smoking of tobacco is permitted; and
  • allows for the growth of up to four plants per household for personal use.

Recently, the provincial government released its plan for retail sale of cannabis in Ontario. The provincially controlled Ontario Cannabis Retail Corporation (OCRC) will be the exclusive online retailer of cannabis in Ontario as well as the exclusive wholesaler of cannabis products to private retailers across the province. Online sale will be the only legal means through which consumers will be able to access cannabis in Ontario as of October 17th, with retail storefronts to be permitted beginning in April 2019. The licensing and enforcement of regulations for private retail businesses will be the responsibility of the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO) and currently, there is no plan to set a cap on the number of licenses that will be issued in a particular area or municipality. Municipalities have the opportunity to “OPT OUT” of permitting cannabis retail outlets in their communities with a deadline of January 22nd, 2019 to submit this decision. Store authorizations will be permitted in areas that do not opt out, but each application will be subject to a 15-day consultation period for public to input to be considered by the AGCO in granting an authorization for a given location. In addition, the proposed legislation currently leaves no room for municipal control in the form of licensing or zoning for retail storefronts which would allow municipalities to determine appropriate areas for locations based on the unique needs of their municipalities.

Under the proposed provincial retail model, private retailers would be licensed to operate by the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO), which will issue a Retail Operator License, a Retail Store Authorization, and Cannabis Retail Manager Licence to authorized individuals. The AGCO will conduct compliance and audit processes, including store inspection prior to opening. The proposed provincial legislation would also establish due diligence requirements and specific eligibility criteria for the issuance of licenses and involve a public consultation process for each retail establishment. Store operating parameters are set to be established by regulations prior to the AGCO receiving applications for licenses beginning at the end of 2018. The proposed legislation also proposes distance buffers between retail storefronts and schools, which would also be set through regulation.

There are clear areas for intervention from a public health perspective, which would decrease harms associated with this new framework for cannabis sale in Ontario communities. With respect to Windsor and Essex County, the OPT OUT approach would certainly provide the greatest level of protections to residents by prohibiting the operation of retail outlets across the region. Such a model would prevent municipalities from competing with one another for revenue, while ensuring that vulnerable populations would not be exposed to cannabis retail in Windsor-Essex. Should opting out on a permanent basis not be the appetite of incoming municipal councils, the possibility of opting out on a temporary basis should be strongly encouraged. Such an opportunity would provide municipalities the opportunity to learn from others across the province who did not choose to opt out, learn more about their options upon the passing of the final provincial regulations, and consider (to the extent which is permitted by the provincial legislation) the possibility of establishing regulations at the local level to establish appropriate areas for retail storefronts in their communities. Additional advocacy activities should be implemented at the municipal level to provide for the opportunity for such regulations at the local level, rather than the black and white Opt in or Opt out model proposed at the provincial level. See the attached Board of Health Resolution for additional recommendations for provincial and municipal oversight.

In-kind resources have been allocated from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit’s cost-shared budget to begin educating the public about the health implications of cannabis use, safer consumption practices, how to speak with children, impaired driving, and other key message areas ahead of legalization. Additionally, the Smoke-free Ontario Act 2017 is set to come into effect as well on October 17th. Recent amendments to this Act permit the consumption of medical and non-medical cannabis anywhere where the smoking of tobacco is permitted. This will add to the enforcement role and broaden the scope of responsibility for Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Tobacco Enforcement Officers. These two activities alone will burden the WECHU with additional costs tied to legalization, in addition to those which may be required to be added in the form of human resources to respond to cannabis legalization and address the potential harms to health and safety.

WECHU Activities to Date

Internal Health Promotion Collaboration – WECHU Cannabis Legalization Working Group

The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit’s Cannabis Legalization Working Group (CLWG) is a collaborative of staff from various departments that aims to mitigate the potential harms of cannabis legalization across broad target populations. The group convened in 2017 and is Chaired by the Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention department, with representation from Policy and Strategic Initiatives, Epidemiology and Evaluation, Communications, Healthy Schools, and Healthy Families departments. Guided by the findings of a situational assessment, the CLWG has established key messages and target populations for cannabis health promotion efforts.

Internal Staff Training and Knowledge Assessment

A survey was distributed to staff of the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit to assess their knowledge and confidence in speaking to clients or community partners related to key cannabis health messages. Findings were used to identify areas of training that would best prepare staff for engaging with their clients. Following this, training for all direct-client service departments provided an overview of the resources available, and WECHU’s key messages. Based on the unique populations served by staff in each department, additional information was provided (e.g., information regarding risks to pregnant and breastfeeding women for Healthy Families, youth-focused information for Healthy Schools).

Community Environmental Scan

In August, 2018, an environmental scan was disseminated to health and social service providers, school boards, law enforcement and emergency services to assess the work currently being done in Windsor-Essex County to address cannabis use disorders or prevention efforts, and gaps in efforts to reduce cannabis harms in Windsor and Essex County.

Cannabis Mass Media Campaign

A mass media campaign has been created to begin educating the public utilizing a variety of media to target priority populations. This campaign will largely make use of content housed on the WECHU website. The goal of WECHU’s Cannabis- Your Questions, Answered campaign is to direct residents to credible, evidence-informed information in a format that encourages sharing through online and social networks. The website contains information related to key messages, a directory of treatment options for cannabis use and other addictions, and resources for workplaces, healthcare providers, and educators. In addition, radio ads have been created to disseminate our key messages and expand the campaign reach, and billboards have been developed to promote safe driving.

Community Outreach and Presentations

As a supplement to the mass media campaign, WECHU staff have already begun delivering community presentations and distributing resources. For example, in June of 2018, two presentations were provided at the Erie St. Clair Regional Cancer Program Frontline Connect events. In addition, a presentation was given to attendees of the Working Toward Wellness Luncheon in June 2018, along with the hosting of an information and resource booth.

Current and Future Initiatives

Windsor-Essex Cannabis Community of Practice

The Windsor-Essex Cannabis Community of Practice will be led by WECHU and meet biannually, starting in 2019, for the purposes of information sharing, collaboration, and capacity building. Group members have been identified through the Environmental Scan with representatives from health, social and community services, and education and municipal services. Meetings of the Community of Practice will include provincial/federal updates related to cannabis legalization, information sharing among members on current community activities, identifying gaps in community services related to legalization, combining resources and identifying opportunities to collaborate, and building capacity to address cannabis use.

Municipal Engagement

Through connecting with representatives from the administration of each municipality, WECHU has provided recommendations on how they can address cannabis in their communities. Primarily, it is the goal of these engagements to encourage municipalities to opt out of retail establishments; however, in the event that this is not of interest, WECHU is committed to supporting municipalities through the development of local regulations which will place restrictions on the areas in which cannabis-related businesses are permitted to operate. Such regulations may involve licensing or zoning parameters, which restrict cannabis-related businesses to operate in areas near schools, addictions facilities, parks, playgrounds, and other areas that serve or are frequented by vulnerable populations.

Teachers, Schools, and School Boards

Ongoing discussion and meetings between WECHU and school board liaisons have led to the population of an online drop box with presentations, toolkits, curriculum supports, posters, resources, and background information on the dangers of cannabis consumption for young people. A letter of support was provided for School Board advocacy of zoning for the location of cannabis retailers and production facilities to have municipalities set minimum distance between such establishments and school property. Support has also been offered onsite at school events and during teacher professional development opportunities, with additional school-aged presentations planned for the 2018-2019 school year that focus on cannabis-impaired driving. Cannabis activities in the school setting have also been integrated with the Windsor-Essex Community Opioid and Substance Strategy through the development of a Youth Engagement Strategy as part of their work in general substance use prevention and education.

Employers and Workplaces

The WECHU has supported workplaces in preparing for legalization by attending community events and developing template resources for employers to utilize in setting up health-promoting education and environments for their employees. By communicating with employers through existing communication channels and continuing to attend community events, WECHU will provide resources for employers to utilize in making decisions related to cannabis and impairment in the workplace.

Social Service and Healthcare Providers

To support reproductive healthcare providers and reach clients through WECHU and community programs, WECHU has utilized resources developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada to their clients through various programs offered through WECHU’s Healthy Families Department (i.e., hospital liaison program, Physician Outreach Program, Healthy Babies Healthy Children, lactation support, Well Baby Clinics and Building Blocks for Better Babies). Additional resources developed by WECHU and gathered from external partners will be provided through other WECHU networks such as the Windsor-Essex Cannabis Community of Practice, and the Windsor-Essex Tobacco Cessation Community of Practice.

Ongoing Surveillance and Monitoring

Currently, WECHU staff contribute to the Ontario Public Health Collaboration on Cannabis Indicators Working Group which seeks to identify existing indicators for cannabis use and related health outcomes and support development of cannabis surveillance at regional and provincial levels. Locally, ongoing work is being done to assess existing local data for cannabis-related health outcomes that can be used to monitor cannabis health outcomes pre and post-legalization, and identify gaps and opportunities for new data collection methods.

Provincial Collaboration

The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit is a co-applicant for the Public Health Ontario Substance Use Locally Driven Collaborative Project. The focus of this project is to identify regional strategies employed by public health agencies and applicable partners in addressing cannabis use among 18-25 year olds. This age often represents the highest rate of cannabis use, is not protected by age restrictions under the federal Cannabis Act, and is still at risk for cognitive damage tied to consumption due to continued brain development at this age. In addition, WECHU attends bi-monthly meetings as part of the Ontario Public Health Collaboration on Cannabis and through this network of public health professionals working in cannabis health promotion, is able to share and gather information on existing strategies and key message areas with public health units across the province.

Approved By:

Theresa Marentette, CEO

References

 

 


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Prepared By:

Jessica Kipping-Labute

Date:

October 18, 2018

Subject:

“Vote for Health” Municipal Election Survey Results

Background

Municipal governments and elected representatives can shape the health of communities through the design and delivery of local policies, programs, and services. The Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) and the Windsor Essex County Health Unit’s (WECHU) Strategic Plan both include a focus on developing, supporting, and participating in local healthy public policy. The Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) specify that Public Health Units (PHUs) are to share healthy public policy recommendations, and participate with stakeholders in the development of public policy that reduces barriers to positive health outcomes. The OPHS also specifies that PHUs are to use data to influence and inform the development of local healthy public policies.

On September 5th, the WECHU launched a voluntary survey distributed to all local council and mayoral candidates running in the upcoming 2018 municipal election. The survey asked candidates how they would prioritize their efforts based on seven local public health priority areas. The priority areas were identified based on local data, results from the WECHU’s 2016 Community Needs Assessment, and the Association of Local Public Health Agencies’ (alPHa) Municipal Election Policy Priorities document. The results of the survey were posted on the WECHU’s website on October 5th.

Results Summary

Candidates were asked how they would spend $100 on the local public health issues. In total, 50% (87) of the candidates completed the survey. They were told that their answers should reflect the amount of time and resources they would give to each public health issue. All candidates that completed the survey said that they would allocate resources towards mental illness. On average, candidates provided 25% ($25.49) of their resources to mental health in the community. The second highest allocation (16%; $16.21) was towards substance misuse in the community.

When candidates gave resources to one of the local public health issues, they were then able to select actions they might take. The actions provided were evidence-supported ways to address the local public health issues.

  • Mental illness had the most frequently selected actions – 89% of candidates said they would advocate for funding for low-or no-cost mental health care to increase local access to treatment; and 87% would support training for first responders and front-line service providers to help people living with mental illness.
  • Food insecurity had the third most frequently selected action – 84% of candidates said that they would support local programs, such as farmer’s markets, community gardens, and community kitchens.
  • Putting fluoride into community water was the least selected action by respondents, with 8% of supporting this action.
  • Substance misuse had the second and third least frequently selected actions – 28% of respondents supported local efforts to investigate the feasibility of safe injection sites; and 38% supported increasing the availability of naloxone and needle disposal bins in the community.

Next Steps

The results from this survey were posted on the WECHU’s website to provide information to the public about municipal candidate stances on healthy public policy issues. The results from the survey will also be used to inform future planning and program development within the WECHU. In 2019 the WECHU will provide an opportunity to all elected municipal officials to meet with the organizations CEO to discuss local healthy public policy issues.

Consultation:

The following individuals contributed to this report:

  • Kristy McBeth, Director, Knowledge Management Division
  • Marc Frey, Manager, Planning & Strategic Initiatives Department

Approved By:

Theresa Marentette, CEO


View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

October 1, 2018

Subject:

September Media Relations Recap Report

August Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

45

Interview Requests

21

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

24

September 2018 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

Story Source

September 2018 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Outlet

Number of Stories

AM 800

8

Blackburn

11

CBC

7

CBC – Radio Canada

1

CTV

7

St. Clair College

1

Windsor Star

5

windsorite.ca

5

TOTAL

45

News Release and Media Advisories

Date Type Headline Response

September 4, 2018

Heat Warning

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Issues Extended Heat Warning

2 Stories Reported

September 5, 2018

News Release

Vote for Health: Municipal Candidates Asked to Share Their Views on Local Health Issues

1 Story Reported

September 14, 2018

News Release

Death Related to West Nile Virus Confirmed

5 Stories Reported

September 18, 2018

Media Advisory

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Meeting

3 Stories Reported

September 19, 2018

News Release

Students in Senior Kindergarten to Grade 5 with Incomplete Immunization Records Suspended from School Today

9 Stories Reported

September 20, 2018

News Release

Register for the Screen-Free Meal Time Challenge today!

0 Stories Reported

September 21, 2018

News Release

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Confirms Selection of New Medical Officer of Health and Chief Executive Officer

3 Stories Reported

September 24, 2018

News Release

Windsor-Essex Joins World Rabies Day Activities By Offering Low-Cost Rabies Vaccine Clinics

3 Stories Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

September 10, 2018

Health Unit Looks For Feedback From Municipal Candidates

September 14, 2018

Windsor-Essex Resident Dies Of The West Nile Virus

September 18, 2018

Lynn Martin - 10AM – Immunization Deadline In Windsor

September 19, 2018

Parents Pack Health Unit To Update Immunization

September 24, 2018

A New Medical Officer Of Health For Windsor-Essex

September 25, 2018

Questions Remain Ahead of Pot Legalization

Note: Two requests from AM 800 do not have a reported story. The station chose not to broadcast the stories.

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

September 2, 2018

No swimming recommended at three local beaches this week

September 4, 2018

Stifling heat prompts extended heat warning

September 10, 2018

Suicide Awareness Raised In Windsor-Essex

September 12, 2018

No Swimming At Four Recommended At Four Local Beaches This Week

September 14, 2018

West Nile virus claims local victim

September 14, 2018

Hep A Scare In Michigan Prompts Vaccination Clinic In Windsor

September 14, 2018

Walk Promotes Suicide Prevention One Step At A Time

September 19, 2018

School Suspensions Start Today For Kids Who Are Not Vaccinated

September 20, 2018

Health Unit Seeks To Clear The Air On Weed Guidelines

September 23, 2018

Health Unit Make Top Executive Positions Permanent

September 25, 2018

Veterinarians Offer Low Cost Rabies Vaccine Clinics

CBC News

Publish Date

Title

September 4, 2018

Windsor's heat warning extended to Wednesday

September 10, 2018

Mosquito Trap Tests Positive For West Nile Virus In Chatham-Kent

September 17, 2018

Meet The People Running For Council In Windsor

September 21, 2018

Swimmers Beware, More Warnings For West Belle River Beach Than Others

September 19, 2018

578 Students In Windsor-Essex Suspended Due To Incomplete Immunization Records

September 21, 2018

8 Opioid-Related Deaths In Windsor-Essex January To March This Year

Note: We were unable to conduct an interview for one of the requests from CBC.

CBC - Radio Canada (French)

Publish Date

Title

September 19, 2018

Vaccination : près de 600 élèves suspendus dans Windsor-Essex

CTV News

Publish Date

Title

September 13, 2018

Time running out for parents to update immunization records

September 14, 2018

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Confirms Death Related To West Nile Virus

September 14, 2018

Mosquitoes From Chatham-Kent Trap Test Positive For West Nile Virus

September 19, 2018

Over 500 Windsor-Essex Students Suspended Due To Incomplete Immunization Records

September 21, 2018

More Questions Than Answers About Legalized Marijuana

September 24, 2018

Used Needle Found By Students At Windsor School

September 28, 2018

Some Windsor-Essex Vets Offering Low-Cost Rabies Vaccine Clinics

Windsor Star

Publish Date Title

September 16, 2018

First Local West Nile Death Of The Year Confirmed

September 19, 2018

Hundreds Of Students Suspended For Incomplete Immunization Records

September 20, 2018

Students Discover Discarded Syringe In Schoolyard

September 24, 2018

$30 Rabies Shots Available For Dogs, Cats On World Rabies Day

Note: We were unable to comment on one interview request since it was outside the scope of public health.

Windsorite.ca

Publish Date Title

September 13, 2018

Final Weekend Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended Four Local Beaches

September 14, 2018

One Person Dies From West Nile Virus

September 14, 2018

Health Unit Holding Hepatitis A Vaccination Clinic For Those Who Attended The Michigan Renaissance Festival

September 19, 2018

Over 500 Students Suspended For Incomplete Immunization Records

September 21, 2018

News Medical Officer Of Health And Chief Executive Officer Chosen To Lead Health Unit

Note: The request from St. Clair College will not appear in their student media channels until October.

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy and Michael Janisse


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On an annual basis, the WECHU prepares its operating budgets for review and approval by its Board.  The budget approval then becomes the foundation for the Annual Service Plan and Budget Submissions to the MOHLTC and MCYS. The due date for the 2019 Annual Service Plan and Budget Submission to the MOHLTC is March 1, 2019. The due date for the Budget Submission to MCYS is April 30, 2019.

Should you require this report in an alternative format, please contact the Health Unit.

2019 Budget Report - PDF (PDF)
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Background

On September 5th, the Windsor Essex County Health Unit (WECHU) distributed a voluntary survey to all local council and mayoral candidates running in the 2018 municipal election. The survey asked candidates how they would prioritize their efforts based on seven local public health priority areas. These areas included: dental health, substance misuse, food insecurity, mental illness, built environment, and climate change. These priority areas were identified based on local data, results from the WECHU’s 2016 Community Needs Assessment, and the Association of Local Public Health Agencies’ (alPHa) Municipal Election Policy Priorities document. This approach was adapted with permission from the Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit, and was modified to address locally relevant issues. The results of the survey were posted on the WECHU’s website on October 5th.

Demographics

The survey was sent to all 174 mayoral and councillor candidates from Amherstburg, Essex, Kingsville, Lakeshore, Lasalle, Leamington, Tecumseh, and Windsor. In total, 50% (87) of the candidates completed the survey. There were more respondents from Essex County than the City of Windsor.

Table 1: Respondents by position

Position

# of candidates

# of respondents

Mayor

19

8 (42%)

Deputy Mayor

16

11 (69%)

Councillor

139

68 (49%)

Total

174

87 (50%)

Table 2: Respondents by municipality

Municipality

# of candidates

# of respondents

Amherstburg

20

11 (55%)

Essex

19

8 (42%)

Kingsville

17

12 (71%)

Lakeshore

25

14 (56%)

Lasalle

12

5 (42%)

Leamington

19

10 (53%)

Tecumseh

12

9 (75%)

Windsor

50

18 (36%)

Total

174

87

Resource Allocation

Candidates were asked how they would spend $100 on the identified local public health issues. They were told that their answers should reflect the amount of time and resources they would give to each topic in their community.

All candidates that completed the survey said that they would allocate resources towards mental illness. On average, candidates provided 25% of their resources to mental health in the community (in relation to the other six public health issue areas). The second highest allocation was towards substance misuse in the community; on average candidates provided 16% of their resources to the issue.

Table 3: Average dollar amount per health issue

Health Topic

$

Mental illness

25.49

Substance misuse

16.21

Built environment

13.76

Food insecurity

13.28

Health inequity

13.14

Dental health

9.55

Climate change

8.57

Vote for Health - Total dollar amount per health issue

Candidate Actions

When candidates gave resources to one of the local public health issues, they were then able to select actions they might take. These actions are evidence-supported ways to address the local public health issues.

  • Mental illness had the two highest actions selected; where 89% of candidates said they would advocate for funding for low-or no-cost mental health care to increase local access to treatment, and 87% would support training for first responders and front-line service providers to help people living with mental illness.
  • Food insecurity had the third highest selected action; where 84% of candidates said that they would support local programs, such as farmer’s markets, community gardens, and community kitchens. However, overall food insecurity had the fourth lowest average dollar amount ($13.28) allocated.
  • Putting fluoride into community water was the least selected by respondents.
  • Substance misuse had the second and third lowest selected action; about 28% of respondents supported local efforts to investigate the feasibility of safe injection sites, and 38% supported increasing the availability of naloxone and needle disposal bins in the community.

Actions selected by health topic

Table 4.1 Dental Health

Action

Yes

No

Put fluoride into the water in your community.

8.05%

91.95%

Increase support for dental health education and awareness.

59.77%

40.23%

Advocate for increased funding for dental health services and expansion of public dental programs.

63.22%

36.78%

Advocate for a provincially-funded dental health program for low income adults and seniors.

67.82%

32.18%

Table 4.2. Substance Misuse

Action

Yes

No

Advocate for sustained resources to address the rising rates of substance misuse.

73.56%

26.44%

Support local efforts to investigate the feasibility of safe injection sites.

27.59%

72.41%

Increase availability of naloxone and needle disposal bins in your community.

37.93%

62.07%

Advocate for increased timely access to treatment services and supportive housing for people struggling with addiction.

77.01%

22.99%

Table 4.3. Food Insecurity

Action

Yes

No

Implement, promote, and support the Living Wage program.

43.68%

56.32%

Support local programs, such as farmer’s markets, community gardens, and community kitchens.

83.91%

16.09%

Participate in the Windsor-Essex Food Policy Council to help shape a sustainable and healthy food system.

65.52%

34.38%

Implement a local food procurement policy for all municipally run facilities (e.g., recreation centres, day cares, etc.)

50.57%

49.43%

Table 4.4. Climate Change

Action

Yes

No

Advocate for ways to improve local air quality (e.g., anti-idling policies).

59.77%

40.23%

Provide support and resources to develop response plans for extreme weather events.

58.62%

41.38%

Prevent diseases such as Zika Virus, Lyme Disease, and West Nile Virus by allocating more funding and support for surveillance and education.

50.57%

49.43%

Advocate for increased education and support to protect our public beaches, preventing beach closures, as well as blue green algae.

65.52%

34.48%

Table 4.5. Mental Illness

Action

Yes

No

Advocate for funding for low- or no-cost mental health care, to increase local access to treatment.

88.51%

11.49%

Support training for first responders and front-line service providers to effectively help people living with mental illness.

87.36%

12.64%

Support local mental health awareness campaigns.

81.61%

18.39%

Table 4.6: Built Environment

Action

Yes

No

Advocate for investments in active transportation infrastructure (e.g., bike trails, walking paths, sidewalks) and public transit.

79.31%

20.69%

Support by-laws, policies, and planning that encourages healthy design characteristics (e.g., safe bike lanes, lighting, green space, parks, walkability).

71.26%

28.74%

Enhance neighborhood walkability by supporting higher residential density and mixed land use.

50.57%

49.43%

Advocate for increased natural and built shade structures.

58.62%

41.38%

Table 4.7: Health Inequity

Action

Yes

No

Ensure there is a wide range of safe and affordable housing options, including rental accommodations.

68.97%

31.03%

Expand opportunities for residents to gain safe and secure jobs with fair pay.

63.22%

36.78%

Increase access to affordable community and recreation programming.

64.37%

35.63%

Support the development and expansion of municipal social investment plans and poverty reduction strategies.

65.52%

34.48%

Table 5: Actions selected by percentage

Action

Selected

Advocate for funding of low- or no-cost mental health care, to increase local access to treatment.

88.51%

Support training for first responders and front-line service providers to effectively help people living with mental illness.

87.36%

Support local programs, such as farmer’s markets, community gardens, and community kitchens.

83.91%

Support local mental health awareness campaigns.

81.61%

Advocate for investments in active transportation infrastructure (e.g., bike trails, walking paths, sidewalks) and public transit.

79.31%

Advocate for increased timely access to treatment services and supportive housing for people struggling with addiction.

77.01%

Advocate for sustained resources to address the rising rates of substance misuse.

73.56%

Support by-laws, policies, and planning that encourages healthy design characteristics (e.g., safe bike lanes, lighting, green space, parks, walkability).

71.26%

Ensure there is a wide range of safe and affordable housing options, including rental accommodations.

68.97%

Advocate for a provincially-funded dental health program for low income adults and seniors.

67.82%

Participate in the Windsor-Essex Food Policy Council to help shape a sustainable and healthy food system.

65.52%

Advocate for increased education and support to protect our public beaches, preventing beach closures, as well as blue green algae.

65.52%

Support the development and expansion of municipal social investment plans and poverty reduction strategies.

65.52%

Increase access to affordable community and recreation programming.

64.37%

Advocate for increased funding for dental health services and expansion of public dental programs.

63.22%

Expand opportunities for residents to gain safe and secure jobs with fair pay.

63.22%

Increase support for dental health education and awareness.

59.77%

Advocate for ways to improve local air quality (e.g., anti-idling policies).

59.77%

Provide support and resources to develop response plans for extreme weather events.

58.62%

Advocate for increased natural and built shade structures.

58.62%

Implement a local food procurement policy for all municipally run facilities (e.g., recreation centres, day cares, etc.)

50.57%

Prevent diseases such as Zika Virus, Lyme Disease, and West Nile Virus by allocating more funding and support for surveillance and education.

50.57%

Enhance neighborhood walkability by supporting higher residential density and mixed land use.

50.57%

Implement, promote, and support the Living Wage program.

43.68%

Increase availability of naloxone and needle disposal bins in your community.

37.93%

Support local efforts to investigate the feasibility of safe injection sites.

27.59%

Put fluoride into the water in your community.

8.05%


View Document page

Board Members Present:

Joe Bachetti, Dr. Ken Blanchette, Mark Carrick, Dr. Deborah Kane, Judy Lund, Bill Marra, Gary McNamara, Dr. Carlin Miller, Hilary Payne, Gord Queen, John Scott, Michelle Watters​

Board Member Regrets:

Paul Borrelli, Richard Meloche, Ed Sleiman

Administration Present:

Theresa Marentette, Dr. Wajid Ahmed, Nicole Dupuis, Lorie Gregg, Kristy McBeth, Dan Sibley, Lee Anne Damphouse

WECHU Presenters: 

Eric Nadalin, Manager, CDIP

  1. Call to Order

    The meeting was called to order at 4:02 p.m.

  2. Agenda Approval

    It was moved

    That the agenda be approved

    CARRIED

  3. Announcement of Conflicts of Interest – None.
  4. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: September 20, 2018.

      It was moved

      That the minutes be approved.

      CARRIED

  5. Consent Agenda
    1. Information Reports

      The following information reports were presented to the Board.

      1. Budget – Recommendation Report (L. Gregg)

        L. Gregg presented the 2019 Budget to the Board for approval and the following information was provided. 

        T. Marentette commented on various community needs (identified in the 2016 Community Needs Assessment) namely substance misuse, oral health, TB increases, immunization rates in our area, Hep C (injection drug use in 50% of cases), changes in OPHS (notably Environmental Health), Cannabis pressures, Vision Screening requirements (with no funding attached), the Vector-Borne program (over 1,200 aedes albopictus mosquitos identified in our region with the potential to carry the Zika Virus) and climate change and extreme weather.

        Funding

        For 2018, WECHU put through our base funding request to the Ministry noting increased operational pressures.  We received a 3% increase.  With the recent change in government health units have been advised to expect a 0% increase.   Knowing this is not sustainable, we are proposing a 3.23% increase from the Ministry ($443,165) and 5% from the municipalities ($273,978).

        Vector-Borne Diseases

        Our funding over previous years for West Nile Virus was typically $128k, with the WECHU contracting out larviciding, trapping and enhanced surveillance.  This year trapping and surveillance for West Nile Virus, along with the enhanced program for aedes, was conducted by health unit staff with the assistance of public health inspection students.  Out of 11 traps aedes albopictus was found in 7 them. 

        This year we have 12 confirmed cases of West Nile Virus, 7 cases of Lyme Disease, and are the only region with confirmed aedes albopictus. With increased funding, we can do more education, awareness and campaigns to the public, and precisely track data to make decisions on larviciding and next steps.  We require more dedicated resources for this program, and the ask this year to increase program expenses to $350k is significant.

        Base and One time funding

        We can submit up to 10 one-time funding business case requests to the Ministry.  Through prioritization, we identified an overall need for 7 additional staff including Public Health Inspectors, Health Promotion Specialists, RPN’s, Tobacco Enforcement Officer, with associated operational costs of $48k for computers and equipment.  

        Healthy Babies Healthy Children and Nurse Practitioner Program

        Program initiative expenditures of $2,755,841 supports 27 individuals for their work within the community.  For 2019, we anticipate $146k for the Nurse Practitioner program expenditures, with 100% funding of $139k allocated for this position.  We will continue to advocate for increased funding to the Ministry of Children and Youth Services to cover the entirety of this position.

        Risks

        With the substantial changes to the Standards, in particular to Environmental Health, the addition of Vision Screening, and operational pressures on our Tobacco Enforcement Officers with the legalization of cannabis, we will need to have further discussions with the Board of Health and municipalities if we receive a 0% increase in funding as noted by the Ministry.  There are also 2 ongoing labour negotiations that have not yet been settled.

        It was moved

        That the Board move into Committee of the Whole at 4:39 p.m.

        CARRIED

        It was moved

        That the Board move out of Committee of the Whole at 4:50 p.m.

        CARRIED

        After brief discussion Board Chair, G. McNamara, read the Resolution Recommendation to the Board of Health. 

        It was moved

        That the Board of Health approve the Resolution Recommendation

        IN FAVOUR - 11

        OPPOSED - 1

        CARRIED

      2. Cannabis – Recommendation Report

        In light of legislation, and since we have not received enough information on what the impact could be, N. Dupuis noted that WECHU’s recommendations is to encourage municipalities to choose the “Opt-out” opportunity.  WECHU has not yet been advised of what dedicated support will be received.

        B. Marra advised that there have been preliminary conversations at Windsor city council to strongly opt-out and err on the side of caution until more information becomes available.  Chair G. McNamara noted that the Town of Tecumseh is arranging a public meeting for their residents with the information that they have so far.

        It was moved

        That the Recommendation be received

        CARRIED

      3. Vote for Health Survey Results
      4. Community Partners List 2018
      5. September Media Relations Recap

        It was moved

        That the information reports be received.

        CARRIED

  6. Business Arising
    1. Capital Project Update

      T. Marentette provided a brief update on the capital project.  Once Colliers Project Leaders completes the RFI, WECHU will go out with a request for suitable space to meet its needs through a developer or a landlord.

  7. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  8. New Business
    1. Staff Appreciation

      D. Sibley advised the Board that the WECHU will be holding their annual Staff Appreciation Day on Friday, November 30 at the Ciociaro Club from 8:30 am – 12:00 pm.  Breakfast will be provided at 9:00 am. The event will recognize staff accomplishments and service awards will be presented. Our guest speaker is Board of Health member John Scott and all Board members are invited and welcome to attend.

  9. Board Correspondence/Other Health Unit Letters/Resolutions
    1. Smoke-Free Ontario Act – For Support
      1. alPHa – Letter to Laura Pisko
      2. Peterborough Public Health – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott
    2. Ontario’s Basic Income Pilot – For Support/Information
      1. Windsor-Essex County Health Unit – For Information
      2. Southwestern Public Health – For Support – Letter to Hon. Lisa McLeod
    3. Why Ontario Needs a Chronic Disease Prevention Strategy – For Support
      1. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott
    4. Drug Policy – For Support
      1. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Public Health – Letter to Right Hon. Justin Trudeau
    5. Repeal of Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada – for Support
      1. Southwest Public Health – Letter to Jody Wilson—Raybould
    6. Dedicated Funding for Local Public Health Agencies – Cannabis Sales – For Support
      1. Middlesex-London Health Unit – Letter to Premier Doug Ford
    7. Displays and Promotion of Vaping Products in Convenience Stores and Gas Bars – For Support
      1. Ontario Campaign for Action on Tobacco (OCAT) – Media Release

        It was moved

        That the above correspondence be Supported and Received

  10. Committee of the Whole (CLOSED SESSION, in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)

    It was moved

    That the Board move into Committee of the Whole at 4:39 p.m.

    CARRIED

    It was moved

    That the Board move out of Committee of the Whole at 4:50 p.m.

    CARRIED

  11. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or November 15, 2018 in Windsor, Ontario
  12. Adjournment

    The meeting adjourned at 5:21 pm.

RECORDING SECRETARY:

SUBMITTED BY:

APPROVED BY:


View Document page
  DIVISIONS
PARTNERS Health
Protection
Health
Promotion
Knowledge
Management
Corporate
Services
AIDS Committee of Windsor X X    
Association of Public Health Epidemiologists in Ontario     X  
Bulimia Anorexia Nervosa Association   X    
Canadian Food Inspection Agency X      
Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) Windsor-Essex  X X    
Cancer Care Ontario X   X  
Central West Communicators Network Group     X  
Child Care Operators (Licenced) X X    
Children First   X    
Children's Safety Village Windsor   X    
Council on Aging Windsor-Essex County   X    
Detroit Health Department X      
Downtown Mission   X    
Environment and Climate Change Canada X      
Erie St. Clair Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) X X X X
Essex County Dental Society   X    
Essex County Federation of Agriculture (ECFA)   X    
Essex Region Conservation Authority (ERCA) X X    
Essex-Windsor EMS X X X  
F.A.R.M.S. X      
Family Health Teams (Windsor-Essex County) X X    
Family Services Windsor-Essex   X    
Fire Departments and Designated Officers (Local) X X    
First Nations - local (e.g. Caldwell First Nation) X X    
Great Lakes Water Institute X      
Health Canada X X    
Health Quality Ontario X      
Healthy Kids Community Challenge    X    
Hiatus House   X    
Homeless Coalition of Windsor-Essex County   X    
Hospitals (Windsor-Essex) X X   X
IDEAS  (Improving & Driving Excellence Across Sectors) Foundations of Q.I. Program      X  
John McGivney Centre   X    
Long-Term Care Facilities/Rest Homes (Windsor-Essex County) X      
Maryvale   X    
Medical Professionals (e.g. Dietitians, Dentists, Midwives, Obstetricians, Nurse Practitioners, Pediatrians, Pharmacists, Physicians,  Veternarians) X X    
Ministry of Education   X    
Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks X   X  
Ministry of Finance   X    
Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care     X X
Ministry of Transportation   X    
Municipalities - Bylaw Enforcement X X    
Municipalities - Community Control Group (Emergency Management) X      
Municipalities (Windsor-Essex,  County of Essex)  X X X X
Newcomer Settlement Agencies - Interpreters and Settlement Workers (e.g. Canadian Multicultural Council, Multicultural Council of Windsor and Essex County, New Canadians' Centre of Excellence, South Essex Community Council) X X X  
Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics   X    
Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health       X
Ontario Association of Communicators in Public Health     X  
Ontario Indigenous Cultural Safety Program Leaders     X  
Ontario Living Wage Network/Committee   X X  
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) X      
Ontario Student Nutrition Program   X    
Police Services (including RCMP and OPP) X X    
Preschool and Family Literacy Centres (5 locations)   X    
Public Health Agency of Canada X   X X
Public Health Ontario X   X X
Raising the Bar: W-E County Committee   X    
Regional Communications Network - Local     X  
Sandwich Community Health Centre X      
School Boards - Local (Agency, Faith-Based, Public, Private) X X    
School Boards - Ontario (e.g. Lambton-Kent District School Board, Rainy River)   X    
Schools - Post Secondary (e,g. St. Clair College, University of Windsor, University of Guelph,
University of Waterloo, Queens University, Brock)
X X    
Seniors Active Living Centres/Clubs (e.g. Life After Fifty)   X    
Service Canada X      
Smoker's Helpline   X    
Southwest Active Recreation Guild (SWARG)   X    
St. Leonard's House    X    
Statistics Canada     X  
Talk 2 Me   X    
Teen Health X      
Treatment Centres - Local (e.g. House of Sophrosyne, Brentwood)   X    
United Way/Centraide Windsor-Essex County   X X  
VON Erie St. Clair Immigrant Health Clinic X X    
Walkerton Clean Water Centre (WCWC) X      
Water Treatment Plants  X      
Welcome Centre Shelter for Women and Families X      
Windsor-Essex Children and Youth Planning Committee   X    
Windsor-Essex Children's Aid Society   X    
Windsor-Essex Communities In Motion (WE-CIM)   X    
Windsor-Essex Local Immigration Partnership (LIP)   X    
Windsor-Essex Regional Chamber of Commerce   X X  
Windsor-Esssex County Children's Aid Society     X  
Working Toward Wellness Committee   X    

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Proposed Motion

Whereas, the federal government has passed the Cannabis Act, 2017 to legalize non-medical cannabis, coming into effect on October 17th, 2018, and

Whereas, the Ontario government has amended the provincial Cannabis Act, 2017 to permit a privatized retail model in Ontario, and

Whereas, cannabis smoke contains many of the same carcinogens, toxins, and irritants found in tobacco smoke with the added psychoactive properties of cannabinoids like THC, and

Whereas, increased density and clustering of cannabis retailers may result in increased access, consumption, and increased risk for chronic disease, mental illness, and injury, and

Whereas, Ontario municipalities will have the one-time opportunity to OPT OUT of cannabis retail outlets in their communities, and

Now therefore be it resolved that, the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health encourages all Windsor-Essex municipalities to OPT OUT of the cannabis retail model as proposed by the provincial government in their respective communities.

FURTHER that the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health encourages the provincial government to establish limits on the number of retailers in a geographic area to prevent clustering and reduce retail outlet density.

FURTHER that, the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health for the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit encourages provincial government to set additional regulations with respect to the proximity of retail outlets in relation to areas which may unfairly target vulnerable populations.

FURTHER that, the provincial government provide local public health units with dedicated funding for public education and health promotion activities as well as the enforcement of cannabis-related regulations under the Smoke-free Ontario Act and FURTHER that the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health for the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit encourages all Windsor-Essex municipalities to amend existing smoke-free by-laws to include “cannabis” in the definition, and expand spaces where the use of substances is prohibited (e.g., cannabis consumption venues or vape lounges).

FURTHER that, previous Resolutions passed by the Windsor-Essex County Board of Health are shared with the newly elected provincial government.

FURTHER that the Windsor-Essex Board of health suggests the province providing for the ability of municipalities to create licensing and zoning regulations, which would be reflective of the unique needs of individual communities in addition to increasing the number and distance of buffer zones proposed for retail outlets from vulnerable areas.

AND FURTHER that this resolution be shared with the Honorable Prime Minister of Canada, local Members of Parliament, the Premier of Ontario, local Members of Provincial Parliament, Minister of Health and Long-term Care, Federal Minister of Health, the Attorney General, Chief Medical Officer of Health, Association of Local Public Health Agencies, Ontario Boards of Health, Ontario Public Health Association, the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, and local community partners.

Appendix

Municipal engagement activities to date

Summary of Activities

Date

Municipality

Activity

November, 2017

Windsor

Presented to city administrators A Public Health Perspective for the Location of Cannabis Retail Storefronts in the City of Windsor: Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Recommendations recommends a minimum distance of 500m to be set between cannabis businesses or production facilities and sensitive areas such as schools, low-income areas, and mental health and addiction treatment facilities.

May 28, 2018

Leamington

Provided a letter in support of the recommended regulations set out in Council Report LLS-28-18, regarding the regulation of cannabis production and distribution. In addition to supporting the restrictions outlined in the report for the regulation of cannabis production and distribution within the municipality, WECHU provided additional insight into the health implications associated with cannabis exposure and additional measures which should be considered in protecting residents from second-hand cannabis smoke and smoking behaviour, including recommendations for the siting of cannabis-related businesses.

June 20, 2018

Windsor

Participated in meeting with representatives from the City of Windsor administration, Ontario Cannabis Store Vice President and Community Engagement Team, and Windsor Police to discuss proposed cannabis retail locations, operations, and safety of operational measures and provide feedback from a public health perspective.

 

Amherstburg

Contributed feedback and recommendations for the Amherstburg Parks Master Plan to establish minimum distance requirements between existing alcohol and cannabis outlets and between all new alcohol/cannabis outlets to playground, youth facilities and recreation areas.

June, 2018

Kingsville

Contributed feedback and recommendations for the Town of Kingsville Official Plan Review: Issues and Policy Directions Report to set minimum distances between cannabis-related businesses and sensitive land use areas.

July 18, 2018

LaSalle

Participated in meeting to discuss legalization implications and needs for the municipality, and present recommendations for zoning of cannabis related businesses and ways to strengthen existing by-laws (e.g. municipal smoking by-laws).

August, 2018

Kingsville

Contributed feedback and recommendations for the Town of Kingsville Application for Zoning By Law Amendment (4.46 Medical Marihuana Production Facilities). Recommendations included establishing minimum distance requirement be increased to no less than 500m between marihuana production facilities and lands zoned for residential, recreational, institutional use and Lake Erie. It was also recommended that facilities should operate with an odour abatement protocol to eliminate noxious odour and conduct environmental impact assessments and provide reports to the municipality.

August 29, 2018

Tecumseh

Attended meeting to provide recommendations for zoning and siting of retail locations and recommend ways to strengthen existing by-laws (e.g. municipal smoking by-laws).

September 28, 2018

All municipalities

Presented recommendations for licensing, zoning, and by-law amendments from a public health perspective to all municipal CAOs. Provided recommendations on how to best approach the private retail model implementation in Windsor-Essex and the importance of a unified approach across municipalities.


View Document page

Proposed Motion

The WECHU Leadership Team recommends:

That the 2019 Cost Share Budget, as presented, requiring a 3.23 percent increase in funding from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and a 5 percent increase in funding from the Obligated Municipalities, the Corporation of the City of Windsor, the Corporation of the County of Essex and the Corporation of the Township of Pelee, be approved.

That total Cost Shared expenditures net of offset revenue for 2019, in the amount of $19,902,586, be approved.

That total expenditures for 2019 relating to the Vector-Borne Disease program, in the amount of $350,000, be approved.

That total Healthy Babies Healthy Children Program Initiative expenditures, in the amount of $2,755,841, be approved.

That total Nurse Practitioner Program Initiative expenditures, in the amount of $146,617, be approved.

That total Related Program expenditures, in the amount of $3,469,870, be approved.


View Document page

September 20, 2018

  1. Call to Order
  2. Agenda Approval
  3. Announcement of Conflict of Interest
  4. Approval of Minutes
    1. Regular Board Meeting: June 21, 2018
  5. Committee of the Whole (Closed Session in accordance with Section 239 of the Municipal Act)
  6. Consent Agenda
    1. INFORMATION REPORTS:
      1. Q2 Reporting (L. Gregg)
      2. Q2 Financial Results (L. Gregg)
      3. Q2 Strategic Plan Report (K. McBeth)
      4. Q2 Planning Report (K. McBeth)
      5. Supervised Injection Services (T. Marentette)
      6. Vote for Health Municipal Election Survey (T. Marentette)
      7. Media Recap (June – August 2018)
      8. CEO Quarterly Compliance (April – June 2018)
  7. Business Arising
  8. Board Correspondence – Circulated
  9. New Business
    1. 2017 Annual Report (K. McBeth)
    2. 2018 BOH Competency Based Self-Evaluation (K. McBeth)
  10. Board Correspondence/Other Health Unit Letters/Resolutions
    1. Mandatory Food Literacy Curricula in Schools – For Support
      1. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Health Unit – Letter to Minister Responsible for Early Years and Child Care, Hon. Indira Naidoo-Harris
      2. Peterborough Public Health – Letter to Deputy Premier, Hon. Christine Elliott
    2. The Toronto Board of Health – Student Nutrition Program –     For Support – Memo to Board of Health in Ontario
    3. The Toronto Board of Health – Toronto Overdose Action Plan – For Support – Reinforce with provincial and federal governments the urgency of the opioid poisoning emergency, and the critical need to scale up actions in response
    4. Association of Local Public Health Agencies – Supervised Consumption Facilities – For Support
    5. Ontario Physical and Health Education Association (OPHEA) – Ministry of Education – Sexual Health Education Component curriculum reverting back to the 1998 version – For Support – Requesting that WECHU align our position with school boards in the Windsor-Essex region leading into the 2018/2019 school year
    6. Smoke-Free Ontario Act, 2017 – Delay in Implementation – For information Only
      1. Sudbury & District Public Health – Letter to Premier Ford
      2. Timiskaming Health Unit – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott, Minister of Health and Long Term Care
      3. Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox & Addington Health Unit – Letter to Hon. Christine Elliott, Minister of Health and Long Term Care
      4. Windsor-Essex County Health Unit – Letter to Premier Ford
      5. Municipality of Chatham-Kent Public Health Unit – Letter to Premier Ford
      6. Grey Bruce Health Unit – Letter to Premier Doug Ford
  11. Next Meeting: At the Call of the Chair, or October 18, 2018 – Essex
  12. Adjournment

View Document page

2018 Q2 WECHU Strategic Plan Progress - At a Glance

Communication and Awareness

Objective

2018 Q1

2018 Q2

1.1. 60% of survey respondents are aware of the programs and services offered by the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing Progressing

1.2 60% of survey respondents have seen or heard about the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing Progressing

1.3 60% of survey respondents are satisfied with internal communication efforts in the WECHU by 2021.

Progressing Progressing

Organizational Development

Objective

2018 Q1

2018 Q2

3.1. A minimum of 2 organization-wide quality improvement activities will occur annually through to 2021.

Objective Met Objective Met

3.2. 100% of the WECHU staff are trained in change management strategies by 2021.

Progressing Progressing

3.3. 100% of corporate risks identified as high have mitigation strategies developed and implemented by 2021

Progressing Progressing

3.4. 80% of the WECHU staff have a positive view of organizational culture by 2021.

Progressing Progressing

Partnerships

Objective

2018 Q1

2018 Q2

2.1. 100% of program/service driven departments implement a formal feedback process with at least one external partnership by 2021.

Work Needed Progressing

2.2. At least 20% of activities in the operational plan identify formal internal partnerships by 2021.

Progressing Progressing

Evidence-based Public Health Practice

Objective

2018 Q1

2018 Q2

4.1. 100% of departments collect corporate level client satisfaction data by 2021.

Progressing Progressing

4.2. 100% of the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) 2018 program areas have at least one activity focused on healthy public policy development by 2021.

Progressing Progressing

4.3. 100% of the OPHS population health assessment requirements (7), the research, knowledge exchange, and communication requirements (3) and the related protocols are being addressed by 2021.

Objective Met Objective Met

4.4. 100% of our programs and service departments have adopted a health equity approach to an activity by 2021.

Progressing Progressing

Communication and Awareness

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q2 UPDATE

1.1 Strengthen the community’s awareness of our programs and services by developing and implementing a corporate communications strategy.

60% of survey respondents are aware of the programs and services offered by the WECHU by 2021.

Marketing and Communications plan still to be developed. 5 policies and procedures are developed and under review. They address elements of organizational branding across media channels.

1.2 Increase the WECHU’s visibility by developing and implementing a community engagement approach.

60% of survey respondents have seen or heard about the WECHU by 2021.

Community engagement plan still to be developed. Enhanced focus on organizational branding has been implemented.

1.3 Improve communication within the WECHU by developing and implementing an internal communication strategy.

60% of survey respondents are satisfied with internal communication efforts in the WECHU by 2021.

The employee engagement strategy is currently being implemented. Baseline measurements associated with internal communication will be generated in Q4.

Partnerships

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q2 UPDATE

2.1 Increase the effectiveness of partnerships through formal feedback mechanisms.

100% of program/service driven departments implement a formal feedback process with at least one external partnership by 2021.

Partnership tool is developed and is currently under review. Piloting will be the next step.

2.2 Increase the number of internal partnerships.

At least 20% of activities in the operational plan identify formal internal partnerships by 2021.

The updated planning tool now includes more detail about internal partnerships for the 2019 planning cycle.

Organizational Development

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q2 UPDATE

3.1 Improve performance by striving towards operational excellence and a focus on continuous quality improvement.

A minimum of 2 organization-wide quality improvement activities will occur annually through to 2021.

The Risk Registry was updated with mitigation plans incorporated into the 2019 planning approach.

The planning system has been updated to incorporate ministry requirements, and training has been provided to all teams. Background work on our quality improvement plan approach is in progress.

Proposals for potential approaches to maintain AODA adherence have been developed.

 

3.2 Increase our readiness to adapt to internal and external factors through effective change management practices.

100% of the WECHU staff are trained in change management strategies by 2021.

Exploring options related to ongoing change management training.

3.3 Enhance our understanding and monitoring efforts of identified corporate risks to embrace opportunities, create flexibility, and preserve organizational assets.

 

100% of corporate risks identified as high have mitigation strategies developed and implemented by 2021

The leadership team has continued to review the risk registry.

Key risk indicators, each with a reporting schedule, will be developed this year.

3.4 Improve organizational culture through people development and employee engagement strategies.

80% of the WECHU staff have a positive view of organizational culture by 2021.

The employee engagement strategy is currently being implemented. Baseline measures for employee engagement are currently being collected. Baseline measurements will be generated in Q4.

Evidence-Based Public Health Practice

OBJECTIVE

GOAL

Q2 UPDATE

4.1 Establish organizational supports for client-centered service strategies.

100% of departments collect corporate level client satisfaction data by 2021.

Through Q2, existing client satisfaction efforts to collect and act on client satisfaction data continued to operate. This has involved one external-facing department and all internal facing departments. Client experience in other departments is yet to be planned out.

4.2 Develop and implement a framework to support healthy public policy.

100% of the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS) 2018 program areas have at least one activity focused on healthy public policy development by 2021.

Management and staff received training on the WECHU’s Public Policy Toolkit and Guidance Document.

There were 6 activities focused on healthy public policy completed in Q2 under the Substance Use and Injury Prevention Standard, Chronic Diseases Prevention and Well-being Standard, and the Healthy Environments Standard. There are activities focused on healthy public policy in progress under the Chronic Diseases Prevention and Well-being Standard, Substance Use and Injury Prevention Standard, the Healthy Environments Standard, and the Infectious and Communicable Diseases Prevention and Control Standard.

4.3 Enhance local data collection efforts and analysis to support knowledge exchange both internally and externally.

100% of the OPHS population health assessment requirements (7), the research, knowledge exchange, and communication requirements (3) and the related protocols are being addressed by 2021.

In the 2018 planning process, 100% of the population health assessment requirements (7), the research, knowledge, exchange, and communication requirements (3) were being addressed by at least one work plan. Moving forward, the way in which this objective is measured and reported is under review and the SPC may consider incorporating the achievement of ASP objectives and indicators related to these requirements into the goal for this objective.

4.4 Develop and implement protocols that ensure all programs and services are using a health equity approach.

100% of our programs and service departments have adopted a health equity approach to an activity by 2021.

The WECHU’s health equity strategy was approved by the Leadership Team, and presented to the Board of Health (BoH) as an information report. Strategy launch presentation and engagement sessions were completed with the Management Team and 86% of the departments to date.

A health equity-focused planning tools evaluation and summary report was completed. Recommended improvements to the tools and procedures are in the process of being implemented.

A health equity focused education session was provided to the BoH in Q3.


View Document page

Prepared By:

Darcie Renaud, Performance Improvement & Accountability Coordinator (PIAC), Planning & Strategic Initiatives (PSI) Department

Date:

July 12, 2018

Subject:

Strategic Plan Q2 Report

Background

The 2017-2021 WECHU Strategic Plan allows our organization to identify key roles, priorities and directions and sets out what we plan to accomplish, how we plan to do it, and how our progress will be measured. The plan is based on four strategic priorities: Communication and Awareness, Partnerships, Organizational Development, and Evidence-Based Public Health Practice.

In early 2018, the Planning and Strategic Initiatives department implemented a corporate tracking system to monitor Strategic Plan performance and to provide quarterly and annual updates to the BoH. In the first quarter of 2018, progress was made on a number of objectives, while more work was needed to move others forward. 

Current Initiatives

In the second quarter of 2018, progress continued on most of the strategic objectives.  The 2018 Q2 Strategic Plan Progress Report provides updates on each objective with corresponding next steps (see appendix A). 

Consultation

The following individuals contributed to this report:

  • Kristy McBeth, Director, Knowledge Management
  • Marc Frey, Manager, Planning & Strategic Initiatives
  • Ramsey D’Souza, Manager, Epidemiology & Evaluation
  • Michael Janisse, Manager, Communications
  • Jennifer Johnston, Health Promotion Specialist, Planning & Strategic Initiatives
  • Jessica Kipping-Labute, Policy Advisor, Planning & Strategic Initiatives
  • Dave Jansen, Performance Improvement and Accountability Coordinator, Planning & Strategic Initiatives

Approved by:

Theresa Marentette


View Document page

Prepared By:

Jenny Diep, Health Promotion Specialist

Date:

August 30, 2018

Subject:

Supervised Injection Services (SIS) Community Consultation Project

Background

Locally in Windsor-Essex County (WEC), we are facing increased morbidity and mortality related to the use of opioids and other drugs.  There were 382 opioid-related emergency department visits in WEC in 2015, which is 3.6-times greater than in 20031.  The rate of opioid-related emergency department visits in Windsor was 2.8-times greater than the rate in Essex County.  There were 24 opioid-related deaths in WEC in 2015; 19 deaths were in the city of Windsor1. Furthermore, the number of hepatitis C cases, a blood-borne infection, increased from 143 reported cases in 2016 to 181 reported cases in 20172.  In 2017, out of the 164 confirmed cases that reported at least one risk factor other than unknown, injection drug use was reported by 62% of cases (101 cases)3.  There have been 211 documented needle-related calls from January 1, 2014 to February 5, 2018 to local municipal service (3-1-1), predominantly in downtown Windsor4.  Number of needle-related calls have significantly increased, from 43 in 2016 to 121 in 2017 (City of Windsor, 3-1-1 calls)4.

Overdose Prevention Sites (OPS) and Supervised Consumption Services (SCS)

In December 2017, in response to overdose-related deaths, Health Canada announced that it would provide temporary class exemptions to provinces and territories demonstrating evidence of an urgent public health need. This allowed for possession and use of controlled substances on exempted sites, known as OPS. This provided a space for people to consume drugs in a safe environment, where staff or volunteers can provide overdose response measures as required. This interim measure allowed communities to plan for a long-term solution, such as a SCS.

 

A SCS is a legally sanctioned site that provides a location where people can bring their own illicit substances to consume under safer conditions and supervised by trained workers who can respond to an overdose as needed5. A SCS includes SIS, and offers treatment, health, and social services for people who are ready to stop or reduce their drug use. An OPS may not have these services in place as a temporary site, while a SCS aims to connect people who use drugs to health and social services. A SCS reflects harm reduction principles, which recognizes that individuals with substance use issues may not wish or be able to abstain from substance use, and thus, seeks to minimize the harms associated with drug use6. It is a part of Health Canada’s Canadian drugs and substances strategy. Benefits of SISs, as acknowledged by the Government of Canada7, include:

  • Reduced overdose-related morbidity and mortality8,9;
  • Reduced injecting and discarding of needles in public space9;
  • No evidence of increased drug-related crime or loitering or rates of drug use9;
  • Increased access to withdrawal management and treatment services and other health and social services5,9;
  • Reduced transmission of blood-borne infections, such as hepatitis C and HIV, through decreased needle sharing8,9; and
  • Reduced health care costs, ambulance calls, use of emergency departments, and hospital admissions8,9.

Prior to the establishment of a supervised consumption site (SCS) and also a requirement of Health Canada’s application for exemption under Section 56.1 of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, community engagement is essential to informing the need and feasibility for a SIS and predicting its success5.  Similar projects have been conducted in London, Toronto, Hamilton, and Waterloo in Ontario.  These projects similarly reflect such projects in British Columbia.

Locally, organizations have expressed interest in applying for a SCS in Windsor.

Current Initiatives

As part of the Windsor-Essex Community Opioid & Substance Strategy (WECOSS) under the Harm Reduction Pillar, the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (WECHU) is leading the Supervised Injection Services Community Consultation Project (SIS-CC) to assess the need and acceptability of SIS in WEC.  The study will:

  • Explore the need for SIS in WEC;
  • Explore the design, potential locations, and conditions under which an SIS would be preferred by potential clients and stakeholders in Windsor; and
  • Assess community perceptions of SIS and identify any concerns and strategies to mitigate such concerns.

This project will involve a mixed methods approach (i.e., quantitative and qualitative):

  1. Analysis of local surveillance data. Existing surveillance data regarding morbidity and mortality related to opioid and substance use, including hepatitis C rates, public discarding of needles, health care service use related to opioid use, and harm reduction service use.
  2. In-person surveys with people who inject drugs (PWIDs). The 45-minute survey explores drug use and injection practices, perceptions of SIS and its implementation (e.g., policies, hours, location), experiences of overdose, health and drug treatment. Peer researchers will be trained to recruit and administer the survey. Peer researchers are hired staff who have had lived experience with injection drug use, and may more likely be able to build a rapport with potential participants to complete the survey.
  3. Public Online survey with the Windsor-Essex County community. The 5-minute online survey involves questions related to perceptions of drug use and SISs and its implementation. This survey may identify additional needs outside of Windsor, and thus, inform future community consultation projects.
  4. Interviews with key informants. A 30-minute interview will be conducted with identified key informants and community leaders including harm reduction service providers, local politicians, key leaders from community service agencies/organizations, advocacy groups and emergency services from Windsor.
  5. Focus groups with key stakeholder groups. A 1.5-hour focus group will be conducted with individuals from key stakeholder groups that have an interest in drug-using populations and can be affected by or affect policy and implementation (or non-implementation) of SIS.  These include first responders (police, fire, and emergency medical services), representatives from municipal government departments, community services agencies/organizations, and community, neighbourhood and business groups from Windsor.

The project will be promoted through social media and the Health Unit and WECOSS websites, which is currently being developed.  More information about SIS, SCS, OPS, and the project will be provided on the WECOSS website.

An application to the University of Windsor Research Ethics Board (REB) has been submitted and pending final approval we expect to launch the survey in late September with data collection continuing to the end of 2018.

References

  1. Windsor-Essex County Health Unit. (2017, June). Opioid misuse in Windsor-Essex. Retrieved from https://www.wechu.org/about-us/reports-and-statistics/opioid-misuse-windsor-essex-county.
  2. Windsor-Essex County Health Unit. (2018). Monthly infectious disease report – February 2018. Windsor, ON: Windsor-Essex County Health Unit.
  3. Data Source: Integrated Public Health Information System (iPHIS), Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care [extracted 2018 Jun 8]
  4. Data Source: City of Windsor, 3-1-1 calls [extracted 2018 Feb 05]
  5. Government of Canada. (2017, July 6). Supervised consumption site: Guidance for application form. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-abuse/supervised-consumption-sites/guidance-document.html.
  6. Canadian Mental Health Association. (2018). Harm reduction. Retrieved from https://ontario.cmha.ca/harm-reduction/.
  7. Government of Canada. (2017, May 26). Statement from the Minister of Health – Health Canada authorizes four new supervised consumption sites. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2017/05/statement_from_themi....
  8. Ng, J., Sutherland, C., & Kolber, M.R. (2017). Does evidence support supervised injection sites. Canadian Family Physician, 63(11), 866.
  9. Kennedy, M.C., Karamouzian, M., & Kerr, T. (2017). Public health and public order outcomes associated with supervised drug consumption facilities: A systematic review. Current HIV/AIDS Reports, 14(5), 161-183. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11904-017-0363-y

Approved by:

Theresa Marentette


View Document page

Prepared By:

Jessica Kipping-Labute

Date:

September 10, 2018

Subject:

“Vote for Health” Municipal Election Survey

Background

Municipal governments and elected representatives can shape the health of communities through the design and delivery of local policies, programs, and services.  Working with partners and decision makers to achieve these outcomes is part of the Ontario Public Health Standards (OPHS), and is one objective of the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit’s (WECHU) 2017-2021 Strategic Plan. 

Under the Foundational Standard of the OPHS, Public Health Units (PHUs) are to share reports, advisories, and healthy public policy recommendations.  As well, PHUs are to contribute to policy work aimed at reducing barriers to positive health outcomes. Specifically, leading, supporting, and participating with stakeholders on policy development to decrease health inequities. In the Program Standards PHUs are to use data to influence and inform the development of local healthy public policies.

Current Initiatives

On September 5th, the WECHU launched ‘Vote for Health’, a voluntary survey distributed to all local council and mayoral candidates running in the upcoming 2018 municipal election. The survey asks about how municipal candidates would prioritize their efforts based on seven identified local health priority areas. These areas include dental health, substance misuse, food insecurity, mental illness, built environment, and climate change. These priority areas were identified based on local data, results from the WECHU’s 2016 Community Needs Assessment, and the Association of Local Public Health Agencies’ (alPHa) Municipal Election Policy Priorities document. This approach was adapted with permission from the Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit and modified to specifically address locally relevant aspects. The results of the survey will be posted on WECHU’s website in late September. The information collected from municipal candidates does not necessarily reflect the views of the WECHU, but instead provides an opportunity for candidates to share their views on local public health issues with the community.

The purpose of the survey is to:

  • Raise awareness of local public health issues.
  • Provide an opportunity for municipal candidates to share their views on these public health issues.
  • Provide residents with municipal candidate’s views on these public health issues to support informed decision-making when voting in the October municipal election.

Support the development of healthy public policy during and after the election period.

Consultation

The following individuals contributed to this report:

  • Kristy McBeth, Director, Knowledge Management Division
  • Marc Frey, Manager, Planning & Strategic Initiatives Department

Approved by:

Theresa Marentette


View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

July 4, 2018

Subject:

June Media Relations Recap Report

June Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

46

Interview Requests

17

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

29

June 2018 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

Story Source

June 2018 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Outlet

Number of Stories

AM 800

8
Blackburn 6
Canada.com 1
CBC 4
Chatham This Week 1
CTV 5
Essex Free Press 1
Wallaceburg Courier Press 1
Watertoday.ca 1
Windsor Star 13
Windsorite.ca 3
TOTAL 44

News Release and Media Advisories

Date Type Headline Response

June 5, 2018

News Release

Mosquito Trap Reveals 2 Aedes albopictus Species in the Area

5 Stories Reported

June 12, 2018

News Release

Beach Water Test Results Available June 13

15 Stories Reported

June 15, 2018

Heat Warning

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Issued Extended Heat Warning

1 Story Reported

June 18, 2018

Media Advisory

Health Unit First In Windsor-Essex To Receive Baby-Friendly Initiative Designation

3 Stories Reported

June 20, 2018

Media Advisory

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Board of Health Meeting at Essex Office

1 Story Reported

June 26, 2018

News Release

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Strives to Help Women Achieve Breastfeeding Goals

1 Story Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

June 5, 2018

Mosquitoes In Windsor-Essex Test Negative For Zika Virus

June 7, 2018

Oral Health Presentation Bring Fluoride Debate To Essex County Council

June 13, 2018

No Swimming At One Local Beach

June 20, 2018

Local Health Unit Recognized For Its Support For Breastfeeding

June 21, 2018

Health Unit Prepares For Changes To The Smoke-Free Ontario Act

June 21, 2018

Swimming Not Recommended At Four Area Beaches

June 26, 2018

Lynne Martin Show – Breastfeeding Reports Are Dismal

June 28, 2018

One Local Beach Not Recommended For Swimming

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

June 5, 2018

Mosquitoes Found In Windsor-Essex Not Carrying Zika Or West Nile

June 6, 2018

Several Sides Sink Their Teeth Into Vigorous Debate Over Fluoride

June 8, 2018

Mental Health Problems Too Prevalent In Windsor-Essex

June 13, 2018

Most Windsor-Essex Beaches Clear For Swimming

June 20, 2018

Four Local Beaches Have High Levels Of Bacteria

June 28, 2018

All Windsor-Essex Beaches Are Open For Swimming

Canada.com

Publish Date

Title

June 20, 2018

Health Unit Strives To Improve Dismal Local Breastfeeding Rate

CBC News

Publish Date

Title

June 5, 2018

Mosquito Trap In Windsor-Essex Captures Known Carriers Of Zika And West Nile Viruses

June 13, 2018

Eight Out Of Nine Beaches Tested In Windsor-Essex Cleared For Swimming

June 13, 2018

Health Unit Warns Businesses To Prepare For Legalized Pot Implications In The Workplace

July 2, 2018

New Rules Outlaw Cannabis Lounges, Windsor Owner Refuses To Shut Down

Chatham This Week

Publish Date

Title

June 20, 2018

Water Sampling Now Bare Minimum (Chatham This Week)

CTV News

Publish Date

Title

June 5, 2018

Two Mosquitos Known To Transmit Zika Found In Windsor-Essex Trap

June 13, 2018

Only One Windsor-Essex Beach Not Recommended For Swimming

June 15, 2018

Extended Heat Warning Issued For Windsor-Essex

June 15, 2018

https://windsor.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=1420685

June 27, 2018

Most Windsor-Essex Beaches Deemed Safe For Swimming This Weekend

Essex Free Press

Publish Date Title

June 14, 2018

WECHU Oral Health Report Recommends Fluoridation Of Drinking Water (Pgs 8-9)

Wallaceburg Courier Press

Publish Date Title

June 20, 2018

Water Sampling Now Bare Minimum (Wallaceburg Courier Press)

Windsor Star

Publish Date Title

June 6, 2018

Daytime Biting Mosquitoes That Could Carry Zika Found In Windsor For Third Year

June 6, 2018

Looming Vaping Regulations Will Drive People To Smoke Cigarettes, Vaping Advocates

June 7, 2018

Health Unit Calls On Windsor, Essex County Municipalities To Add Fluoride To Water

June 13, 2018

Beach Monitoring Season Starts With Single Warning For High Bacteria

June 13, 2018

Reader Letter: Fluoridation Of Drinking Water Obsolete And Detrimental

June 14, 2018

Beware Of Ticks — Local Number Of Lyme Disease Cases Continues To Grow

June 14, 2018

Employers Seek Guidance For Workplace Rules For Marijuana

June 15, 2018

Lasalle Pharmacist Named Ontario's 2018 Pharmacist Of The Year

June 20, 2018

Health Unit Strives To Improve Dismal Local Breastfeeding Rate

June 22, 2018

Keep Taking Precautions Against Deer Ticks, Says Health Unit

June 28, 2018

Swimming Not Recommended At Belle River Beach

June 29, 2018

Heat Warnings Issued For Blistering Long Weekend

Windsorite.ca

Publish Date Title

June 13, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended At One Beach

June 20, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended At Four Beaches

June 27, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended At One Local Beach

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy and Michael Janisse


View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

August 1, 2018

Subject:

July Media Relations Recap Report

July Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

45

Interview Requests

8

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

37

July 2018 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

Story Source

July 2018 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Outlet

Number of Stories

AM 800

8

Blackburn

5

CBC

10

CTV

8

The Square

1

Windsor Star

7

Windsorite.ca

5

Yahoo News

1

TOTAL

45

News Release and Media Advisories

Date Type Headline Response

July 6, 2018

Heat Warning

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Ends Extended Heat Warning

3 Stories Reported

July 11, 2018

News Release

First West Nile Virus Positive Mosquito Pool Found

7 Stories Reported

July 12, 2018

Heat Warning

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Issues Extended Heat Warning

0 Stories Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

July 4, 2018

Essex Council Say No To Fluoride

July 4, 2018

Three Lake Erie Beaches Not Recommended For Swimming

July 6, 2018

Relief! Heat Warning Lifted For Windsor-Essex

July 11, 2018

Three Local Beaches Not Recommended For Swimming

July 11, 2018

Signs Of West Nile In Windsor-Essex

July 18, 2018

Sandpoint Beach Closed Because Of High Bacteria Counts

July 25, 2018

Two Area Beaches Closed

July 31, 2018

One Local Beach Not Recommended For Swimming

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

July 4, 2018

Three Local Beaches Not Recommended For Swimming

July 11, 2018

Three Local Beach Warnings This Week

July 11, 2018

West Nile Virus Found In Windsor-Essex

July 18, 2018

Two Thirds Of Local Beaches Are Not Safe For Swimming This Week

July 25, 2018

Two Beaches Closed This Week

CBC News

Publish Date

Title

July 3, 2018

Windsor-Essex Remains Under Heat Warning Until Thursday

July 4, 2018

Essex Town Council Says 'No' To Fluoride In Drinking Water

July 10, 2018

'There's No Relief,' Street Help Says Heat Makes Life Even Harder For Homeless

July 11, 2018

3 Essex County Beaches Unsage For Swimming, Health Unit Warns

July 11, 2018

Mosquito Pool Test Positive For West Nile Virus In Windsor-Essex

July 19, 2018

First Beach Closure This Year In Windsor At Sandpoint Beach Due To E. Coli

July 25, 2018

Windsor Closes Second Beach In As Many Weeks After High E. Coli Levels In Colchester

July 30, 2018

Beach Closures Mean Unsafe Sand Too, Says Water Quality Specialist

CTV News

Publish Date

Title

July 4, 2018

Essex Council Says Resounding ‘No’ To Fluoridated Water

July 5, 2018

Three Of Nine Local Beaches Post High Bacteria Counts

July 6, 2018

Extended Heat Warning Ends In Windsor-Essex, Chatham-Kent

July 11, 2018

High Bacteria Counts At Three Windsor-Essex Beaches Prompt Warning From Health Unit

July 11, 2018

First Sign Of West Nile Virus This Season Found In Windsor

July 18, 2018

Sandpoint Beach Closed Due To High Bacteria Counts

July 25, 2018

Two Windsor-Essex Beaches Closed To Swimmers

The Square

Publish Date Title

July 12, 2018

West Nile Mosquito Pool Found

Windsor Star

Publish Date Title

July 2, 2018

Highway 3 Reopened After Extreme Heat Buckled Road

July 3, 2018

Province Pauses New Rules Outlawing Cannabis Lounges For Medical Users

July 5, 2018

Essex Councillors Vote Against Fluoridating Drinking Water

July 12, 2018

First Positive West Nile Mosquito Pool Found

July 12, 2018

Health Unit Warns Three Local Beaches Unsafe For Swimming

July 18, 2018

'Danger!' — Pollution Spike Leads To Sand Point Beach Shutdown

July 19, 2018

Nursing Student's App Aimed At Saving Opioid Overdose Victims

Windsorite.ca

Publish Date Title

July 4, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended At Three Local Beaches

July 11, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended At Three Local Beaches

July 11, 2018

First West Nile Virus Positive Mosquito Pool Found

July 18, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: One Beach Closed, Swimming Not Recommended At Five Others

July 25, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Two Beaches Closed, Swimming Not Recommended At One Other

Yahoo News

Publish Date Title

July 30, 2018

Beach Closures Mean Unsafe Sand Too, Says Water Quality Specialist (shared article from CBC)

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy and Michael Janisse


View Document page

Prepared By:

Communications Department

Date:

September 7, 2018

Subject:

August Media Relations Recap Report

August Media Coverage

Total Media Coverage

49

Interview Requests

7

Mentions (In the news without direct interviews)

42

August 2018 Media Relations Recap - Media Coverage

Story Source

August 2018 Media Relations Recap - Story Source

Media Coverage

Outlet

Number of Stories

AM 800

7

Blackburn

9

CBC

10

CTV

10

Windsor Star

5

Windsorite.ca

8

TOTAL

49

News Release and Media Advisories

Date Type Headline Response

August 20, 2018

News Release

Six West Nile Virus Positive Mosquito Pools Found

7 Stories Reported

August 23, 2018

News Release

Student Suspensions Will Begin September 19th For Students Born Between 2008 to 2013 With Incomplete Immunization Records

5 Stories Reported

August 24, 2018

News Release

First Human Case of West Nile Virus Confirmed

6 Stories Reported

Stories Reported by the Media

AM 800

Publish Date

Title

August 9, 2018

Weekend Beach Testing Results

August 15, 2018

Colchester Beach Not Recommended For Swimming

August 20, 2018

Local Health Unit Needs Up To Date Immunization Records

August 20, 2018

Six Mosquito Pools Test Positive For West Nile Virus

August 22, 2018

Swimming Not Recommended At West Belle River Beach

August 23, 2018

Local CMHA Expands Suicide Prevention Awareness Week

August 24, 2018

First Human Case Of West Nile Virus In Windsor-Essex

   

Blackburn News

Publish Date

Title

August 1, 2018

All Beaches Open For Swimming

August 9, 2018

High Bacteria Levels Close Two Local Beaches

August 15, 2018

Swimming Not Recommended At One Local Beach

August 20, 2018

West Nile-Positive Mosquito Pools Found In Windsor-Essex

August 21, 2018

Swimming OK In All But One Local Beach

August 23, 2018

Are Your Child's Immunization Records Up To Date

August 24, 2018

Health Officials Identify First Human Case Of West Nile This Season

August 28, 2018

Two Local Beaches Not Fit For Swimming

August 31, 2018

Information Fair On Overdose Prevention

CBC News

Publish Date

Title

August 1, 2018

Windsor-Essex Beaches Open With A Warning Issued At One

August 1, 2018

Amid EpiPen shortage, a Canadian-based company has approval for an alternative

August 9, 2018

E. Coli Forces Closure Of Two Beaches In Windsor-Essex This Week

August 15, 2018

No Windsor-Essex Beach Closures But Colchester Beach Unsage

August 15, 2018

Hotel-Dieu CEO Says Overdose Prevention Sites Are 'Necessary' For Windsor-Essex

August 17, 2018

Algal Blooms No Longer Visible At Point Pelee

August 20, 2018

West Nile Virus Found In Chatham-Kent And Windsor-Essex Mosquitoes Again

August 22, 2018

Warning Issued For West Belle River Beach, No Closures

August 24, 2018

Windsor-Essex Health Unit Confirms First Human Case Of West Nile Virus For 2018

CTV News

Publish Date

Title

August 1, 2018

West Belle River Beach Deemed Unsafe For Swimming

August 9, 2018

Two Beaches Unsafe For Swimming In Windsor-Essex: Health Unit

August 8, 2018

Health Minister Discusses Opioid Problem In Windsor

August 15, 2018

Colchester Beach Not Recommended For Swimming

August 20, 2018

Six Windsor-Essex Mosquito Pools Test Positive For West Nile Virus

August 20, 2018

Two More Mosquito Traps In Chatham-Kent Test Positive For West Nile

August 22, 2018

Warning Issued For West Belle River Beach

August 22, 2018

Local Agencies Expand Suicide Prevention Awareness Campaign

August 23, 2018

Students Born Between 2008 and 2013 Face Suspension If Not Immunized

August 24, 2018

Health unit confirms this year’s first human case of West Nile Virus

Windsor Star

Publish Date Title

August 15, 2018

Ontario Freezes Pay Of Public Sector Execs Making $100 K Or More

August 17, 2018

Suicide Prevention: Keep Writing Your Story, Says Woman Who Lost Friend To Suicide

August 20, 2018

Six West Nile Pools Tested Positive This Past Week

August 23, 2018

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit Reminds Students To Get Immunizations

August 24, 2018

Summer's first local human case of West Nile virus confirmed

Windsorite.ca

Publish Date Title

August 1, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended One Local Beach

August 8, 2018

Updated: Weekly Beach Report: Wimming Not Recommended At Three Local Beaches

August 15, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended One Local Beach

August 20, 2018

Six West Nile Virus Positive Mosquito Pools Found

August 22, 2018

Weekly Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended One Local Beach

August 23, 2018

Student Suspensions Will Begin September 19th For Students With Incomplete Immunization Records

August 24, 2018

First Human Case Of West Nile Virus Confirmed

August 29, 2018

Labour Day Weekend Beach Report: Swimming Not Recommended Two Local Beaches

The following individuals contributed to this report: Jennifer Jershy and Michael Janisse


View Document page

Prepared By:

Lorie Gregg, Director of Corporate Services

Date:

September 6, 2018

Subject:

Q2 Financial Results

Background

The Leadership Team of the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (“the WECHU”) monitors financial results on an on-going basis for the following programs:

  • Mandatory programs funded to a maximum of 75% (“Cost-Shared”) by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (“MOHLTC”) and the Corporation of the City of Windsor, the Corporation of the County of Essex and the Corporation of the Township of Pelee (hereinafter referred to as the “Obligated Municipalities”);
  • Related programs such as Vector-Borne Diseases and Small Drinking Water Systems, funded on a cost-shared basis to a maximum of 75% by the MOHLTC and certain surrounding municipalities within the geographic boundaries of Windsor and Essex County;
  • Related programs funded 100% by the MOHLTC;
  • Related programs funded 100% by the Ministry of Children and Youth Services (“MCYS”);
  • One-time business cases.

The second quarter financial report to the Board includes a budget to actual comparison and narrative for material variances for all programs listed. Forecasted financial results will be presented as a part of the Q3 and Q4 reporting.

Cost-Shared Program Financial Results

The following is the financial information for the Cost-shared programs including Vector-Borne Diseases and Small Drinking Water Systems for the second quarter of 2018.

 

 

2018 Budget

YTD Budget

YTD Actual 2018

YTD Actual 2017

Variance to Budget

% Spent

Salaries

12,946,856

6,473,428

5,906,244

5,987,092

567,184

46%

Employee Benefits

3,331,935

1,665,968

1,684,183

1,569,870

-18,215

51%

Travel and Meetings

39,650

19,825

9,064

11,082

10,761

23%

Mileage

198,531

99,266

94,109

99,005

5,157

47%

Professional Development

108,700

54,350

27,295

43,500

27,055

25%

Association and Membership Fees

45,000

22,500

34,525

40,140

-12,025

77%

Office Supplies

35,000

17,500

14,239

18,463

3,261

41%

Program Supplies

655,847

327,924

276,185

351,212

51,739

42%

Office Equipment Rental

144,000

72,000

70,113

61,537

1,887

49%

Publications

500

250

897

-

-647

179%

Purchased Services

105,000

52,500

24,498

55,746

28,002

23%

Promotional

8,829

4,415

400

7,250

4,015

5%

Board Expenses

22,294

11,147

8,714

1,131

2,433

39%

Professional Fees

128,600

64,300

32,748

30,643

31,552

25%

Bank Charges

17,900

8,950

8,046

9,386

904

45%

Rent

770,000

385,000

349,109

355,927

35,891

45%

Building Maintenance

145,200

72,600

81,854

69,107

-9,254

56%

Utilities

147,000

73,500

62,589

65,954

10,911

43%

Taxes

227,500

113,750

103,754

113,885

9,996

46%

Insurance

80,000

40,000

79,351

77,334

- 39,351

99%

Telephone

121,200

60,600

54,648

66,531

5,952

45%

Security

28,000

14,000

10,442

9,992

3,558

37%

Vehicle Expenses

2,100

1,050

279

766

771

13%

Postage and Freight

17,450

8,725

8,473

8,398

252

49%

Parking

88,000

44,000

41,746

33,866

2,254

47%

 

19,415,092

9,707,548

8,983,505

9,087,817

724,043

46%

Offset revenues

- 179,175

-89,588

-71,547

-48,429

-18,041

40%

 

19,235,917

9,617,960

8,911,958

9,039,388

706,002

46%

West Nile Virus

128,800

64,400

24,018

64,400

40,382

19%

 

19,364,717

9,682,360

8,935,976

9,103,788

746,384

46%

For the period January 1, 2018 to June 30, 2018, cash flows on account of the 2018 program year for this program are as follows:

MOHLTC $6,660,548
Corporation of the City of Windsor $1,491,516
Corporation of the County of Essex 1,246,642
$9,398,706

For material variances where the financial captions percentage spent exceeds 50%, an explanation has been provided:

  • Benefits: Expenditures in this financial caption relate to amounts paid/payable by the WECHU on account of medical, dental and extended health benefits as well as amounts paid on account of certain other payroll remittances (i.e. OMERS contributions, CPP, EI, EHT, WSIB). The dollar negative variance is not material and will be monitored over the remainder of the fiscal year with any remaining negative variances funded by the Salaries financial statement caption.
  • Association and Membership Fees:  Expenditures in this financial caption relate to memberships in an association or other group by virtue of professional requirements or to support initiatives associated with Public Health.  The majority of Association and Membership Fees are paid earlier in the fiscal year.  For the remainder of the year, fees will be lower and thus tracking will be in line with budget as the year progresses.
  • Publications:  Expenditures in this financial caption include costs of subscriptions.  The dollar value of this negative variance is not material and will be monitored and offset by other underutilized financial captions as the fiscal year progresses.
  • Building Maintenance:   Expenditures in this financial caption relate to amounts paid on account of building maintenance, grounds keeping and house keeping supplies.  At June 30, 2018, the negative variance of $9,254 resulted from:  i) annual elevator maintenance fees for the period May 1, 2018 to April 30, 2019 of $8,546 were paid; ii) grounds keeping costs for snow removal are typically higher in the first half of the fiscal year compared to the latter half (3 months of service from January to March of 2018 compared to 2 months of service from November to December of 2018); iii) additional costs incurred on account of unplanned HVAC repairs.  
  • Insurance:  Expenditures in this financial caption include costs associated with general liability insurance, property insurance, director and office insurance coverage as well as cyber coverage.   Insurance premiums are paid at the beginning of the year.  There will be no further insurance premiums in 2018 and this financial caption should remain underspent at year-end.

Risks:  Of noteworthy mention when considering the financial information above are the following:

  • Status of collective bargaining agreements – Collective bargaining agreements with CUPE (contract expired December 31, 2017) and ONA (contract expired March 31, 2018) remain outstanding.  As such, the WECHU may be required, dependent upon the results of negotiations, to make retroactive payment for contractual increases not yet reflected in the year-to-date financial results disclosed above.
  • Status of other labour related matters – Other labour related matters (i.e. pay equity; impacts associated with grievances) which remain unsettled, have not be reflected in the year-to-date financial results above given the uncertainty associated with the settlement of those matters.

Healthy Babies Healthy Children Program Financial Results

 

2018 Budget

YTD Budget

YTD Actual 2018

YTD Actual 2017

Variance to Budget

% Spent

Salaries and benefits

2,623,390

1,311,695

1,231,909

1,228,035

79,786

47%

Mileage and travel

60,000

30,000

25,162

25,018

4,838

42%

Professional Development

13,400

6,700

7,299

4,676

(599)

54%

Program Supplies

38,251

19,126

14,710

16,758

4,416

38%

Purchased Services

15,000

7,500

3,664

10,008

3,836

24%

Professional Fees

5,800

2,900

2,900

-

-

50%

 

2,755,841

1,377,921

1,285,644

1,284,495

92,277

47%

Funding - MCYS

(2,755,841)

(1,377,921)

(1,399,929)

(1,377,929)

22,008

51%

 

-

-

(114,285)

(93,434)

114,285

 

The Healthy Babies/Healthy Children Program is funded through the Ministry of Children and Youth Services.  This program supports 27.0 FTEs comprised of managers (2), nurses (17), family home visitors (4), social worker (1), and support staff (3).  The objective of the program is to ensure a healthy future for children and their families.

For the second quarter of 2018, the HBHC program is $92,277 underspent due in part to staffing vacancies associated with leaves of absence (i.e. maternity leaves, unpaid absences, etc.).  
Refer to the Risks discussion noted in the Cost-Shared Program Financial Results section of this report, as this would be relevant to this program.

Nurse Practitioner Program Financial Results

 

2018 Budget

YTD Budget

YTD Actual 2018

YTD Actual 2017

Variance to Budget

% Spent

Salaries and benefits

139,000

69,500

73,284

71,307

- 3,784

53%

 

139,000

69,500

73,284

71,307

- 3,784

53%

Funding - MCYS

- 139,000

- 69,500

- 69,508

- 63,717

8

50%

 

-

-

3,776

7,590

- 3,776

 

The Nurse Practitioner Program is funded through the Ministry of Children and Youth Services.  This program supports 1 FTE (nurse practitioner).  The objectives of the program are to promote healthy pregnancy, birth and infancy for children, improve parenting and family supports, strengthen early childhood development, learning and care.

The 2018 budget submission to the MCYS includes a one-time grant request for $5,210 representing the forecasted overage in Salaries and Benefits for the year-ending December 31, 2018.  As at the date of this report, our one-time funding request has not been approved.  The WECHU will continue to monitor this unfavourable variance and anticipate that it will ultimately be funded by the Cost-Shared Budget.

Financial Information for Related Programs Funded 100% by the MOHLTC

Healthy Smiles Ontario

2018 Budget

YTD Budget

YTD Actual 2018

YTD Actual 2017

Variance to Budget

% Spent

Salaries and Benefits

1,206,022

603,011

557,685

534,555

45,326

46%

Admin and Accommodation

33,149

16,575

16,575

25,000

(0)

50%

Travel and Meetings

8,000

4,000

647

1,134

3,353

8%

Mileage

10,000

5,000

8,031

6,270

(3,031)

80%

Professional Development

5,100

2,550

2,976

2,571

(426)

58%

Association and Membership Fees

300

150

546

443

(396)

182%

Office Supplies

4,500

2,250

342

341

1,908

8%

Program Supplies

100,229

50,115

66,269

31,437

(16,154)

66%

Purchased Services

162,400

81,200

31,805

30,625

49,395

20%

Total expenditures

1,529,700

764,851

684,876

632,376

79,974

45%

Offset revenue

-

-

(6,300)

-

6,300

0%

Funding - MOHLTC

(1,529,700)

(764,850)

(704,400)

(554,400)

(60,450)

46%

 

-

-

(25,824)

77,976

25,824

 

The 2018 Annual Service Plan and Budget Submission included a budget of $1,529,700 for Healthy Smiles Ontario (“HSO”), inclusive of the $120,900 augment approved by the MOHLTC on May 7th, 2018.

At June 30, 2018, the net underspent budget amounted to $79,974.  Material variances are detailed below:

  • The base funding approval of $120,900 included an addition of 1 FTE (dental assistant) of $71,471 Salaries and benefits that the WECHU would not operationalize until such time as an approval was received.  The budget impact of this deferral resulted in an approximate underspend of $35,735. 
  • In Q2 of 2018 additional Program Supplies costs of $16,425 were incurred on account equipment replacements.
  • Purchased services were underspent at June 30, 2018, due to the following:  i) The May 7th, 2018 augment to base funding included additional funding for purchased services of $36,400 for contract dentistry.  The WECHU is currently in the process of completing the requisite policy work to procure the services of a contract pediatric dentist.  It is anticipated that this dentist will be in place by Q4 of 2018.  ii) The WECHU had only 2 contract dentists for Q1.  A third contact dentist was added in March of 2018 servicing our Leamington dental clinic; iii) Fees paid to contract dentists are typically one month behind.
  • Offset revenue of $6,300 was earned in Q1 of 2018 on account of the sale of three autoclaves using a third party auction site as required by the WECHU policies and procedures for disposing of tangible capital assets.

Refer to the Risks discussion noted in the Cost-Shared Program Financial Results section of this report, as this would be relevant to this program.

Smoke-Free Ontario and Electronic Cigarettes Acts

2018 Budget

YTD Budget

YTD Actual 2018

YTD Actual 2017

Variance to Budget

% Spent

Salaries and benefits

519,217

259,608.50

258,241

255,699

1,368

50%

Mileage

35,800

17,900

16,815

15,740

1,085

47%

Travel and Meetings

6,245

3,122.50

1,794

1,675

1,329

29%

Professional Development

5,500

2,750

4,291

839

(1,541)

78%

Association and Membership Fees

156

78

-

-

78

0%

Program Supplies

44,582

22,291

12,421

14,288

9,870

28%

Purchased Services

25,200

12,600

7,653

7,295

4,947

30%

Total expenditures

636,700

318,350

301,215

295,536

17,135

47%

Funding - MOHLTC

(636,700)

(318,350)

(318,349)

(318,349)

(1)

50%

 

-

-

(17,134)

(22,813)

17,134

 

Enclosed above is the financial information associated with the WECHU’s requirements to:

  • Comply and adhere to the Electronic Cigarettes Act:  Public Health Unit Guidelines and Directives: Enforcement of the Electronic Cigarettes Act;
  • Comply and adhere to the Smoke-Free Ontario Strategy:  Public Health Unit Tobacco Control Program Guidelines and the Directives:  Enforcement of the Smoke-Free Ontario Act. 

At June 30, 2018, the total unspent budget amounted to $17,135.  The most notable variance relates to the Professional Development financial caption.  In Q1 of 2018, an individual was sent to a non-violence conflict resolution train-the-trainer course amounting to $4,180.  The unfavourable budget variance in the Professional Development financial caption continues to be monitored with any remaining budget overage to be offset against the favourable variance Program Supplies financial caption.

Refer to the Risks discussion noted in the Cost-Shared Program Financial Results section of this report, as this would be relevant to this program.

Other MOHLTC Related Programs

2018 Budget

YTD Budget

YTD Actual 2018

YTD Actual 2017

Variance to Budget

% Spent

Chief Nursing Officer Initiative

121,500

60,750

55,838

57,495

4,912

46%

Enhanced Food Safety - Haines Initiative

53,800

26,900

19,122

505

7,778

36%

Enhanced Safe Water

32,900

16,450

914

7,449

15,536

3%

Harm Reduction Program Enhancement

250,000

125,000

116,232

-

8,768

46%

Infection Prevention and Control Nurses Initiative

90,100

45,050

49,323

6,667

(4,273)

55%

Infectious Diseases Control Initiative

461,700

230,850

216,307

223,702

14,543

47%

Needle Exchange Program Initiative

63,000

31,500

31,500

-

-

50%

Social Determinants of Health Nurses Initiative

180,500

90,250

97,348

93,075

(7,098)

54%

Total expenditures

1,253,500

626,750

586,584

388,893

40,166

47%

Funding - MOHLTC

(1,253,500)

(626,750)

(308,875)

(246,375)

11

25%

 

-

-

277,709

142,518

40,177

 

A description of other related programs is included below:

Chief Nursing Officer Initiative:  Under the Organizational Requirements of the Ontario Public Health Standards, the Chief Nursing Officer role serves to enhance health outcomes of the community at individual, group and population levels:  i) Through contributions to organizational strategic planning and decision making; ii) By facilitating recruitment and retention of qualified, competent public health nursing staff; iii) By enabling quality public health nursing practice.  This funding envelope supports 1 FTE meeting certain qualifications as required by the Ontario Public Health Standards.  At June 30, 2018, there are no negative variances to report on.

Enhanced Food Safety – Haines Initiative:  Base funding for this initiative supports the enhancement of the Board of Health’s capacity to deliver the Food Safety Program as a result of the Provincial Government’s response to Justice Haines’ recommendations in his report “Farm to Fork:  A Strategy for Meat Safety in Ontario”.  At June 30, 2018, there are no negative variances to report on.  It is anticipated that these funds will be fully expended by Q4 of 2018.

Enhanced Safe Water:  Base funding for this initiative supports the enhancement of the Board of Health’s capacity to meet the requirements of the Safe Water Program Standard under the Ontario Public Health Standards.  At June 30, 2018, there are no negative variances to report on. It is anticipated that these funds will be fully expended by Q4 of 2018.

Harm Reduction Program Enhancement:  Base funding for this initiative supports the Board of Health in the activities associated with its Local Opioid Strategy.  More specifically it supports 2.5 FTEs dedicated to working on activities associated with:  i) Our local opioid response; ii) Naloxone Distribution and Training; iii) Opioid Overdose Early Warning and Surveillance.   At June 30, 2018, there are no negative variances to report on.

Infection Prevention Control Nurses Initiative:  Base funding for this initiative supports one additional infection prevention and control nursing FTE having certain qualifications.  At June 30, 2018, negative variances of $4,273 have resulted as salaries and benefits for this position have exceeded the approved funding.  Negative variances will be absorbed by the Cost-Shared Budget.

Infectious Disease Control Initiative:  Base funding for this initiative supports the hiring of infectious diseases control positions (4.5 FTEs) and supporting these staff to monitor and control infectious diseases.  They serve to enhance the Board of Health’s ability to handle and coordinate increased activities related to outbreak management.  At June 30, 2018, there are no negative variances to report on.
Needle Exchange Program Initiative:  Base funding for this initiative supports the purchase of needles and syringes, and their associated disposal costs, for the Board of Health’s Needle Exchange Program.  At June 30, 2018, there are no negative variances to report on.

Social Determinants of Health Nurses Initiative:  This initiative was established to support 2 public health nursing FTEs with specific knowledge and expertise in social determinants of health and health inequities issues, and to provide enhanced supports internally and externally to the Board of Health to address the needs of priority populations impacted most negatively by the social determinants of health.  At June 30, 2018, negative variances of $7,098 have resulted as salaries and benefits for these positions have exceeded the approved funding.  Negative variances will be absorbed by the Cost-Shared Budget.

Refer to the Risks discussion noted in the Cost-Shared Program Financial Results section of this report, as this would be relevant to these programs.

Financial Information for Related Programs Funded 100% by the MOHLTC

 

2018 Budget

YTD Actual 2018

Variance to Budget

% Spent

Mandatory Programs: Potassium Iodide Distribution Program

167,000

19,492

147,508

12%

Mandatory Programs: Public Disclosure System

20,000

8,548

11,452

43%

Capital: Windsor Office Project

275,000

36,861

238,139

13%

Needle Exchange Program Initiative

10,100

-

10,100

0%

Public Health Inspector Practicum Program

20,000

10,789

9,211

54%

Vector-Borne Diseases Program: Enhanced Mosquito Surveillance

46,700

16,480

30,220

35%

Total expenditures

538,800

92,170

446,630

 

Mandatory Programs:  Potassium Iodide Distribution Program:  One-time funding to improve nuclear emergency preparedness and increase knowledge amongst residents living within the primary and secondary zone of the Fermi 2 nuclear generating station.  Eligible costs include Potassium Iodide pill packs, and staff salaries, project materials, printing and postage associated with the distribution of KI packs and ongoing communication campaigns.  It is anticipated that funds will be utilized by March 31, 2019.

Mandatory Programs:  Public Disclosure System:  One-time funding must be used to update software and inspection forms to meet the new disclosure requirements under the Ontario Public Health Standards.  Eligible costs include software update, disclosure, and migration.  Implementation of the disclosure system is planned for November of 2018 and will require 3rd party resources as well as internal resources for support (i.e. Information Technology; Healthy Environments).  It is anticipated that funds will be utilized by March 31, 2019.

Needle Exchange Program Initiative:  One-time funding for extraordinary costs associated with delivering the Needle Exchange Program.  Eligible costs include purchase of needles/syringes and associated disposal costs.  One-time funds were expended in Q3 of 2018.

Public Health Inspector Practicum Program:  One-time funding must be used to hire the approved Public Health Inspector Practicum positions.  Eligible costs include student salaries, wages and benefits, transportation expenses associated with practicum positions, equipment and educational expenses.  The practicum placements commence in May and conclude in August annually.  It is anticipated that these funds will be utilized in Q3 of 2018.

Vector-Borne Diseases Program:  Enhanced Mosquito Surveillance:  One-time funding must be used for an enhanced surveillance program.  Eligible costs include salaries for students, supplies and additional equipment, identification and testing expenses, promotional costs and mileage.  It is anticipated that these funds will be utilized by Q4 of 2018 with the conclusion of this year’s surveillance program.

Capital:  One-time funding must be used to assist with costs to complete the capital planning requirements for a Stage 2 – Business Case submission.  Utilization of these funds is dependent upon the status of the work being completed internally and by third party consultants based upon the direction from the WECHU’s Board. 

Approved by:

Theresa Marentette


View Document page