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Planning your workplace wellness program begins by identifying wellness topics that are relevant to your employees.  Click here for an example Needs Assessment.  To understand your employee’s health needs, you may also want to consider reviewing health insurance provider benefits utilization data, workers compensation and disability claims, employee assistance program use and or absenteeism records.   

Evaluation of workplace wellness activities is important for accessing their effectiveness and improving them to better align with your employees’ interests and wellness needs. 

This is a list of some examples of information you could collect to evaluate your awareness raising workplace wellness activities.  It is not necessary to collect all of this information to evaluate your awareness activity.

  • The number of employees who received and/or reported seeing the wellness information.
  • The number or percentage of employees who learned new information to improve their health and the things that they learned.
  • The number or percentage of employees who reported being motivated to make changes to improve their health and the things that they were motivated to do.
  • The recommendations of different ways to share similar wellness information with their employees.

Download Example Employee Feedback Questions for Awareness Raising Activities

The example suggests information you could collect to evaluate your awareness raising workplace wellness activities. It is not necessary to collect all of this evaluation data. You may chose to distribute a survey by email or paper or to collect evaluation data through recording employee’s verbal feedback in interviews or a focus group and writing a short summary. Feel free to adapt the questions to suit your awareness raising activities.

This is a list of some examples of information you could collect to evaluate your education or skill-building workplace wellness activities.  It is not necessary to collect all of this information to evaluate your education or skill-building activity.

  • The number of employees who were sent and/or reported seeing the invitation to attend the education activity.
  • The ways employees heard about the education or skill-building activity.
  • The number of employees who registered and attended the education or skill-building activity.
  • The percentage who were satisfied or very satisfied with the education or skill-building activity.
  • The things employees liked and did not like about the education or skill-building activity.
  • The percentage who would participate in a similar education or skill-building activity again.
  • The changes or incentives that could motivate employees to participate in a similar wellness activity in the future.
  • The factors that made it challenging to participate in the wellness activity.
  • The percentage who reported learning new information to improve their health and the things that they learned.
  • The percentage who reported being motivated to make changes to improve their health and the things that they were motivated to do.
  • The recommendations of different ways to share similar wellness information to employees in the future.
  • Change in employee motivation or in the workplace culture as a result of the education or skill-building activity.

Download Example Employee Feedback Questions for Education and Skill-Building Activities

The example suggests information you could collect to evaluate your education and skill-building workplace wellness activities. It is not necessary to collect all of this evaluation data. You may chose to distribute a survey by email or paper or to collect evaluation data through recording employee’s verbal feedback in interviews or a focus group and writing a short summary. Feel free to adapt the questions to suit your education and skill-building activities.

This is a list of some examples of information you could collect to evaluate your workplace's supportive environment activities.  Depending on your type of supportive environment, some of the education/ skill-building evaluation questions may be more appropriate.  It is not necessary to collect all of this information to evaluate your supportive environment activity.

  • The number of employees who are aware of the supportive environment.
  • The ways employees heard about the supportive environment in the workplace.
  • The number of employees who registered and attended (e.g., flu clinic)/ regularly use the supportive environment (e.g., fridges for employee lunches).
  • The percentage who were satisfied or very satisfied with the supportive environment.
  • The things employees liked and did not like about the supportive environment.
  • The changes or incentives that could motivate employees to use the supportive environment more.
  • The factors that made it challenging to participate in the supportive environment.
  • The percentage who reported learning new information to improve their health and the things that they learned.
  • The percentage who reported being motivated to make changes to improve their health, what they were motivated to do and what they actually did to improve their health.
  • The recommendations of different ways to share similar wellness information to employees in the future.
  • The change in employee motivation or in the workplace culture as a result of the supportive environment.
  • The change in employee sick day usage or employee turnover since the supportive environment was implemented.

Download Example Employee Feedback Questions for Supportive Environment Activities

The example suggests information you could collect to evaluate your supportive environment workplace wellness activities. It is not necessary to collect all of this evaluation data. You may chose to distribute a survey by email or paper or to collect evaluation data through recording employee’s verbal feedback in interviews or a focus group and writing a short summary. Feel free to adapt the questions to suit your supportive environment activities.

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