Main Page Content

Cancer is a leading health issue in Ontario. In 2010 the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit released a report outlining the following statistics on cancer in the Windsor-Essex area from 1986-2005:

Incidence and Mortality
  • Crude Cancer Rates, 1986-2005
  • Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIRs) and Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs)
  • All Cancers Combined
  • Lung Cancer
  • Colorectal Cancer
  • Oral Cancer
  • Melanoma (Skin Cancer)
  • Breast Cancer (Females)
  • Prostate Cancer
  • Cervical Cancer
  • Childhood and Adolescent Cancer
Trends
  • Cancer Trends 
  • Time Trends in Incidence Rates, Ontario and Windsor-Essex
  • Time Trends in Incidence Rates by Sex, Windsor-Essex
  • Time Trends in Mortality Rates, Ontario and Windsor-Essex
  • Time Trends in Mortality Rates by Sex, Windsor-Essex
  • Statistical Modeling of Time Trends in Windsor-Essex and Ontario
Modifiable Risk Factors
  • Tobacco Use and Exposure to Second Hand Smoke
  • Alcohol Consumption
  • Physical Inactivity
  • Unhealthy Eating
  • Excess Body Weight
  • Cancer Prevention

Highlights from this report:

  • For the period 1986-2005, lung cancer had the highest crude incidence rate in Windsor-Essex County (WEC) in males and females combined.
  • The top three cancers diagnosed in males were prostate, lung, and colorectal cancers, accounting for nearly 57% of all male cancers. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among males (117.3 per 100,000 population).
  • The top three cancers diagnosed in females were breast, lung and colorectal cancers, accounting for nearly 54% of all female cancers. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among females (113.9 per 100,000 population).
  • Lung cancer continues to be the leading cause of cancer death in both males and females, accounting for 31.6% and 21.6 % of all cancer deaths, respectively.
  • Among males, colorectal and prostate cancers are the second and third most common cancer-specific causes of death.
  • Among females, breast and colorectal cancers are the second and third most common cancer-specific causes of death.
  • Relative to Ontario, males in WEC had significantly higher incidence rates for all cancers combined (5%), cancers of lung (18%), pancreas (15%), kidney (14%), prostate (6%), and leukemia (10%), and a significantly lower incidence rate of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (13%).
  • Compared to Ontario, incidence rates in females in WEC were significantly higher for cancers of pancreas (22%), lung (13%), and kidney (12%), and significantly lower for melanoma (skin cancer) (28%) and esophageal cancer (26%).
  • Relative to Ontario, males in WEC had significantly higher mortality rates for all cancers combined, oral, pancreatic, and lung cancers, and a significantly lower mortality rate for liver cancer.
  • Compared to Ontario, cancer mortality rates in females were significantly higher for all cancers combined, oral, pancreas, and lung cancer, and significantly lower for esophageal cancer.
  • Compared to the rest of Erie St. Clair region, males in WEC had significantly higher incidence rate for liver cancer. They had significantly lower incidence rates for all cancers combined, colorectal cancer, and melanoma.
  • Compared to the rest of Erie St. Clair region, females in WEC had a significantly higher incidence rate for kidney cancer. They had significantly lower incidence rates for all cancers combined, cancer of esophagus, colorectal cancer, and melanoma.
  • Mortality rates in WEC for males, as compared to the rest of Erie St. Clair region, were significantly higher for stomach cancer, and significantly lower for esophageal, colorectal, and prostate cancers. The female mortality rates in WEC were significantly lower for esophageal cancer and leukemia, and higher for oral cancer.
  • Overall, in WEC during the period of 1986-2000, five-year cancer survival improved with the exception of lung cancer.
  • The age-adjusted incidence rates for all cancers combined had a significant increase of 0.37% and 0.44% per year in WEC and Ontario respectively. In WEC, age-standardized incidence rates by sex for all cancers combined showed a relatively stable trend for males and a significant increase of 0.48% per year for females.
  • Age-adjusted incidence rates for lung and colorectal cancers in WEC showed a non-significant decreasing trend. Lung cancer incidence rates in WEC showed a significant decrease by 1.88% per year for males and a significant increase by 1.96% per year for females. In WEC, colorectal cancer incidence rates revealed a relatively stable trend for females and a non-significant decrease of 0.64% per year for males.
  • Age-adjusted incidence rates for breast cancer did not reveal any particular trend in WEC and in Ontario. Age-adjusted incidence rates for prostate cancer revealed a significant increase by 2.79% per year in WEC.
  • Mortality rates of all cancers combined showed a significant decrease of 0.71% and 0.78% per year in WEC and Ontario, respectively. Mortality rates of all cancers combined revealed a significant decrease by 1.28% per year for males and a relatively stable trend for females in WEC.
  • In WEC, lung cancer mortality rates showed a significant decrease by 1.87% for males and a significant increase by 1.98% per year for females.
  • Breast cancer mortality rates revealed a significant decrease by almost 2% per year in WEC. Prostate cancer mortality rates revealed a significant decrease of 1.62% per year.
  • Colorectal mortality rates decreased significantly by 1.89% per year in WEC and 1.64% per year in Ontario. Oral cancer mortality rates decreased significantly by 2.06% per year in WEC. A significant decrease of 1.87 % per year was observed in Ontario.
  • There was a significant difference for cervical cancer between the time trend in incidence rate of WEC and that of Ontario. There was a significant difference in incidence rate trends of lung and oral cancers between males and females. Statistical modeling by sex showed a significant difference in the trends of mortality rates for all cancers combined, and lung cancer.
  • The proportion of the community health survey respondents with normal weight is significantly lower in WEC (40.39%) than in Ontario (45.65%). For obese class I, the proportion is higher in WEC (15.25%) than in Ontario (12.03%).
  • There is a significant difference between the proportions of the residents who consumed fruits and vegetables less than five times per day in WEC (65.24%) and Ontario (58.54%) and five to ten times per day in WEC (31.35%) and the province (37.41%).

To request a copy of the full report, please submit the Question or Comment form on this page, or contact the EPEQ department at extension 1424.