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A-Z Health Topics lists public health information that's not found in other areas of our website. You'll find a wide variety of topics here, most of which include links to other websites where you can find even more information.

If you think we're missing a topic, you can email us to suggest one by going to our Contact Us page.

Health Topics

A (10) | B (6) | C (16) | D (1) | E (8) | F (3) | G (3) | H (12) | I (6) | L (10) | M (10) | N (2) | P (2) | R (3) | S (7) | T (5) | U (2) | V (2) | W (2) | Y (2) | Z (2)
An alphabetical listing of Health Topics.
Title
Animal Bite

If you’re bitten or scratched by a domestic animal (your own, a stray or someone else’s), a wild animal or directly exposed to a bat (bite, scratch, or the bat has touched or landed on you):

Amebiasis

Amebiasis is an infection caused by a parasite, called Entamoeba histolytica. It lives in the feces (poop) of a person. Most infections occur in a person’s stomach and intestines (gastrointestinal tract). In some people, the disease may occur in the liver, lungs, skin, and other parts of the body.

Aedes albopictus mosquito

The Aedes albopictus mosquito is a tropical mosquito that is part of the Aedes species which is capable of transmitting Zika virus. Although this species of mosquito, also known as the Asian tiger mosquito, is capable of transmitting viruses including Zika, it is not the species that is responsible for the majority of human cases of Zika virus infection in the Caribbean, South America and Florida. That species is the Aedes aegypti mosquito.

Aedes aegypti mosquito

The Aedes aegypti mosquito is a tropical mosquito that is part of the Aedes species. It is capable of transmitting several viruses, including Zika, dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever. These mosquitoes are small and have a black and white pattern on their legs and other parts of the body.

Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP)

Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) describes a group of conditions with set symptoms. AFP is identified by the sudden weakening or loss of muscle tone in children less than 15 years old, without a clear cause.

A Guide to Common Infections

This booklet will help support you in the management of a child attending your facility who has a communicable disease.